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Full text of "San Francisco News Letter (Jan.-June 1925)"

ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856 




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price io cents Cal|FORN|a ADVERTISER 



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URDAY, JANUARY 3, IS 



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EiUblUhtd July 10, 1&S6 

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Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20. 1856,'by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

Jr.. from ivm to 192S. Is now printed and published by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 235 Montgomery St., San Francisco, California. Telephone 

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Not.. CYI 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JANUARY 3, 1925 



No. 1 



— A Happy New Year! (And about this time many of us 
are already breaking some of our numerous New Year's reso- 
lutions!) 

* * # 

— Of all the perverse, provoking, disturbing, ornery-, foolish 
and pestiferous emotions in the procession of life, Love leads 
the band wagon. 

— Those people who shot themselves (or was it each other?) 
in Chicago during the recent freezing weather, must have be- 
lieved sincerely in a hereafter. 

* * * 

— Hear what Robert Browning said about the Wise Thrush : 
"That's the wise thrush; he sings each song twice over, lest 
you should think he never could recapture the first tine care- 
less rapture!" 

* * * 

— Britannia to Egypt: "I gave you liberty. See to it that 
the things done by you in her name do not make me repent 
my gift!" Shades of our American forefathers! Mow many 
times must they have felt repentence ! 

* * * 

— These Mc Nabs are a winning tribe. We note that one of 
them has been made United States District Attorney for the 
Southern District. Fie spells his name with two "bs." That 
only shows a more generous disposition. He has all the other 
characteristics of the family. 

* * * 

— According to the Trade Record of the National City Hank 
of New York, we now produce and export many products 
which were formerly imported and on the other band we arc 
bringing in many articles of which we are already the world's 
largest producer. These changes constitute the curious turns 

in international trade. 

* * * 

— Those of us that have any influence with Jupiter Pluvius 
should get in and use that influence, because next year will be 
quite a pivotal year in that regard. There are three year-' 
rains to lie made up, for the wells are dry. so that we may 
all have a wet January is greatly to he desired, and by the 
pious to be prayed for. 

* * * 

— Seattle has the right idea, in barring prohibition agents 
from entering private residences in liquor raids, unless statu- 
tory requirements have been complied with, and evidence that 
liquor is being sold, has been secured. Even in the dark ago 
in old England, "a man's house was his castle." How far 
From such sentiments have we traveled today! 

* * * 

— It would seem as if January 10th were still to see red 
breeches in Cologne. That may lie all right from one point of 
view, hut from another and more sensible angle, this per- 
petuation of the war seven years after date, is a bit silly. Let 
us all go home and mind our own business. For once we have 
to congratulate our people on their common sense with regard 
to the occupation. 



— If one owes money and wants to borrow more, it would 
seem to be a necessary preliminary to acknowledge the debt 
already owing. This elementary fact seems to be unintelligible 
to the French. For an astute race, they are most dense on the 
matter of borrowed money, and it is good that we have a New 
England President who has Connecticut views on borrowed 

money. 

* * * 

— If the object of the visiting Japanese "fleet" is to promote 
friendly feelings between the United States and Japan, then 
we say "More power to the whole proposition!" But we can- 
not help smiling a little in our beards (only we have no 
beards ) when we think of a similar time and welcome given 
to a certain Teutonic submarine in pre-war days which landed 
on American soil from across the Atlantic. 

* * # 

— The newspaper paragraphs which contain resolutions for 
the New Year uttered by prominent people are notable only 
for their dullness and respectability. It was not always like 
that. We can remember the time when Arthur McEwen or 
Ambrose Bierce wrote stuff at this time of the year that spark- 
led over continents and oceans and gave us a reputation for 
brilliancy. Then we were not fighting the demon Rum. 

— There is a tendency to offset the widespread intolerance 
which has been so marked in certain circles during the past 
year. All good Americans will aid in the campaign against 
those secret orders which flourish in the soil of bigotry and 
hatred. We have lots of room in our country for all creeds 
and all men of good intent. 

* * * 

— When we look at the year and think what evils have been 
avoided and how well on the whole we have come through 
conditions which might have laid us low. we have lots to be 
thankful for. even if the drought and the cattle plague did hit 
us in soft spots. There is lots of resiliency in this state be- 
cause it is very strong and healthy and rich enough to laugh 

at fate for quite a long time. 

* * * 

— Only a few months ago everybody was jeering at British 
planes. Now, they ar'e acknowledged to he the best, and the 
cautious Briton is talking about mastery of the air in the same 
self assured manner that he has always talked about mistress- 
ing the seas. What has happened? lias the British mechani- 
cal engineer found something which is not generally known? 
We are inclined to think that it is connected with engine im- 
provement. 

* * * 

— This is the way "The Autobiography of Margot Asquith" 
came to be written: "Can you give me a thousand pounds?" 
said Mrs. Asquith one day to her husband. "No, not even 
a thousand pence." "Then may I write a book?" she asked. 
'Acs. on condition you do not ask me to read it." A year 
later, on the day the book appeared. Mr. Asquith read it in one 
flash. He ran to his wife. "Margot." he said. "It is a master- 
piece: the little mistakes do not matter." — and the eyes of both 
were full of tears. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 3. V>2 




To all of our readers we wish a 
A Happy New Year Happy New Year. We have peace 

and prosperity at home, and abroad 
and the dark clouds which have for ten years hung omi- 
nously over the rest of the world appear to be breaking 
and there would seem to be fair weather ahead. Not that 
one can place any confidence in phenomena. The changes 
are so frequent and the potentialities of trouble are so many 
that the most that can be done in the way of prophecy is 
to predict a future based on the continuance of the present 
tendencies. As compared with the past these are most 
promising. The election secured a government which can 
be depended upon to further American interests and to 
maintain the confidence of invested capital without which 
confidence we can have no prosperity under the conditions 
of today. . We have a president who is not showy, but 
who has displayed an unusual 1 ability in determining the 
signs of the times and who has a very useful preference for 
economy in administration. Taxes on industrial efforts 
are too high at present and too great a burden is placed on 
that accumulation of wealth, without which we cannot un- 
dertake the activities necessitated by the development of 
our system, which, in its very nature, must constantly seek 
new fields of endeavor and add to the prosperity of the 
entire nation by the exploitation of those natural resources 
which make us at one and the same time the most wealthy 
and the most envied of peoples. In addition to this politi- 
cal security we have an industrial tranquility which 
promises well. The senseless struggle between capital and 
labor has been at least suspended. Never in our history- 
has there been a new year with fairer promises or a rosier 
outlook. May all our readers share in the wealth and glory 
of our country in 1925 ! . 



We have talked over the matter of 
Juvenile Thievery juvenile crime before, but make no 

apology for again referring to it, as it 
seems to posses a very pressing interest for all classes in 
the community. From the lowest to the highest publica- 
tions, there is always a greater or less amount of comment 
on it and some departments of the daily papers are being 
conducted by experts, whose only claim to attention is 
their glibness in discussing what is taken to be an ascer- 
tained social fact. But, in spite of all our searching, we 
do not seem to be able to come into contact with such 
evidence as would place the delinquency of the modern 
juvenile in the realm of certainty. There has been a dis- 
cussion among various police officers with regard to this 
and they differ. One says that there is greater moral laxity 
and others deny it. Another says, with more wisdom than 
the rest, that perhaps the modern restrictions and prohibi- 
tions make offenses seem more obvious. But one says 
something that is not denied by others and which is 
capable of proof by statistics. That ominous fact is that 
dishonesty is more common among the young. Petty theft 
is the thing which gets most youngl people into trouble 
when they come into the hands of the authorities. That 
is a terribly serious thing. If the rights of property are 
despised by our young, the whole fabric of civilization is 
menaced by such perversion. Theft strikes at the very base 
of things and lays the foundation for all sorts of trouble 
in the future. The courts should cease to be maudlin about 
the theft. Let youth know that any tampering with the 
"mine and thine" means punishment and probable ruin to 
the thief. 



Some day a real humorist will come 
Little Black Books along and will write the history of 

the ineffably ludicrous prohibition 
fight. He will tell the story of the little black books which 
have played so prominent a part in the mess of corruption 
and incapacity. Ever since a paternal government deter- 
mined to thrust down our throats the prohibition measure, 
against which we voted and with respect to which the vast 
majority of our citizens have nothing but hostile con- 
tempt, little black books have been appearing. Where do 
all the little black books come from ? Are they the sign 
and symbol of the bootlegger? Is it necessary to get a 
little black book when one goes into the business of ille- 
gitimate trade in cheer, as it is to get a mask and a night- 
gown when one joins the K. K. K.? Be that as it may; 
and I suppose the truth will not be revealed till the dread 
day when we discover what became of most of the liquor 
taken from the Quadra, little black books are of ominous 
importance. That one which showed that the police rake- 
off for protection was greater than the federal agents were 
receiving, raised a great deal of trouble which has not as 
yet died down. Now, there is another little black book 
and they say that it contains the names of more than 
twenty army officers and at least one judge. The names 
are not revealed. Of course not ; when the names are re- 
vealed, if there are any names (which is doubtful), the 
chance of blackmail will be gone and reputable people can- 
not be threatened by vicious agents with ruin, unless they 
come through. Nothing worse has happened in the whole 
of our municipal history than that bald statement in the 
press about the contents of the mythical black books. It 
gives every chance to the blackguard and the blackmailer 
to work his game and to make money out of the hyper- 
sensitive who shrink from threatened publicity. It is not 
too much to say that we have reached the very depths of 
malicious brutality in this campaign. 



A week ago the Board of 
San Francisco Development Supervisors passed an ord- 
inance directing City At- 
torney George Lull to proceed with the condemnation of 
land necessary to the development of the extension of Van 
Ness Avenue through to Mission. It has taken the Board 
three years to come to a decision concerning one of the 
three major projects for the upbuilding and growth of 
San Francisco, which was known as the "San Francisco 
Program", this being a form of recommendations and plans 
made by Dr. B. M. Rastal, who was employed by the 
Chamber of Commerce to make a survey of the city as an 
industrial engineer. This is the. same gentleman who has 
conducted the affairs of Californians, Inc., with such 
marked and notable success. The other two things which 
the engineer considered as necessary preliminaries to our 
growth, are the razing of Rincon Hill and the establish- 
ment of an annual Industrial Exposition. The Industrial 
Exposition has been launched and the Van Ness extension 
is apparently on the way to a start at least. But Rincon 
Hill still sticks out like a sore thumb and the city suffers 
in consequence. It will cost $326,277 to cut through the 
land necessary for the extension of Van Ness. We are not 
carping about it, but something might have been saved by 
a little earlier action. The extension of Van Ness makes 
it possible to erect on Mission Street, between Eleventh 
and Twelfth, the great passenger terminal depot for rapid 
transit electric service to peninsula points, as well as for 
all south-bound coast passenger traffic. This will be a great 
saving in every way over the present cumbersome and tire- 
some journeying required at present. The scheme would 
involve the removal of the through and suburban lines 
terminal from Third and Townsend to Mission and their 
electrification as far as San Jose. This would mean won- 
ders in the way of the city and the peninsula. 



January 3, 1925 



AND CALIF0RN1 \ Al>\ ERTISER 



Harry Kirkwood, formerly 
Reducing Air Postal Rates of the New York stock ex- 
change, and now of San 
Francisco, has made suggestions with respect to an aerial 
post card rate which, it is his contention, will realize a 
sufficient sum to increase the number of postal aerial lanes 
and greatly facilitate the development of the air post. The 
plan, according to our local postmaster, James E. Power, 
might produce additional funds, but in all probability not 
so much as the designer calculates; moreover Congress 
would have to pass appropriate legislation to make it effec- 
tive. The notion is to reduce the cost of post card sending 
by the air route from eight to two cents a zone. It is calcu- 
lated that out of the two and a half billion post cards used 
annually in this country one billion would go to the air mail 
under the new schedule. We are not postal experts and we 
cannot say how much there may be of probability in the 
proposed addition to the post card service. But we can see 
that there is much reason in the contention that the present 
rate of eight cents for a post card, weight one-eighth of an 
ounce, as against- the same charge for a letter weighing half 
an ounce is absurdly out of proportion. We are all prac- 
tically agreed that the air mail service can be developed if 
there is sufficient inducement to persuade the people to use 
it. We also know that the development of the air mail 
service implies also the development in use of the airplane 
and that such development is in the very nature of things 
imperative for our economic and social progress. 



As we have said in these columns the 
Wilson and Peace death of Woodrow Wilson by no 

means ended his influence. We have 
had a notable illustration of this locally in the meeting to 
celebrate his birthday held at the Palace Hotel. Another 
meeting of great significance was held in New York at the 
same time at the Hotel Astor. It is notable that each of 
these meetings was addressed by the winners of the prize 
of $25,000 awarded for peace plans. Viscount Cecil of Chelt- 
wood received the prize in New York. Dr. David Starr Jordan, 
the prize for the same amount in San Francisco. It is one <>f 
the most striking comments upon the way in which history 
moves that the man who made war should be regarded as 
the great peacemaker. Viscount Cecil said of him : "lie was 
a great American and a great citizen of the world anil there 
is no title to fame higher than that." Dr. Jordan won his 
prize on the subject of education for peace. Both of these 
great men, for they are great men, who have faced unpopu- 
larity for their opinions, hailed our dead President as one 
of the great factors in the movement looking to the aboli- 
tion of war. So that it would appear that though Woodrow 
Wilson seemed to be swallowed up in the mists of defeat, 
the sun of his glory is still shining through. 



Three Cooks and the Broth 
It is easy to visualize the incongruity of a people'- being 
governed by two distinct and competitive sets of rulers; 

the result is chaos. San Francisco is beset with a similar 
condition, to wit: we have here, not two. but three distinct 
and commercially antagonistic systems of passenger carry- 
ing utilities. It is true that competition begets better ser- 
vice, but there is a limit to this — a point is reached where 
to further compete entails an overhead impossible to carry 
without serious injury to service. The Municipal, Market 
ami California Street traction enterprises are non-intcr- 
transfering, distinct units, their lines of railway often 
lap and therefore duplicate: they are commercially antag- 
onistic without the redeeming feature this often gives in 
better service. They should be united and thereafter a plan 
could be evolved with them as a nucleus to provide the 
ever increasing intra-city traveling public with a first-class 
and serviceable traction system — something we now sorely 
need. 



Catlin Motor Oil 

That our supply of petroleum from oil-wells is nearly ex- 
hausted is the fear of a number of people throughout the 
United Slates. These people should he interested in the state- 
ment made in an address by Dr. David T. Day, formerly pe- 
troleum expert of the C. S. Bureau of .Mines, that a single basin 
in the Uintah Mountains contains, stored up in its rocky sides, 
eight times as much oil as all the wells of the United States 
have ever produced, or are ever likely to produce. We are not, 
then, on the edge of an oil famine. The trouble is not to find 
the oil-bearing shales, according to Dr. Day, but to get the oil 
out. If the cost is going to be like extracting the gold from sea 
water, evidently we might starve for oil amid all this abun- 
dance. Dr. Day, however, reports such advance in improved 
methods of extraction that several points are already in suc- 
cessful operation. Among other things, he says : 

". . . There are two good processes available and in com- 
mercial use at the present time. A plant of either system can 
be erected in the time required to drill the average California 
well, and the cost of a plant to produce 400 barrels of oil per 
day does not exceed the cost of drilling a well. The fact that 
the shale industry has arrived, was emphasized six weeks ago 
by a celebration by Elko, Nevada, people who commemorated 
the commercial success of the shale plant which Mr. Robert 
M. Catlin has spent many years in developing. The celebration 
included a parade, a real Western cowboy round-up, a circus, 
barbecue for over 3,500 people, and addresses of welcome by 
the Governor of Nevada, and many other dignitaries. Even the 
town was lighted by shale oil, for it furnished the fuel for the 
electric-light plant. Every automobile and many airplanes 
were run on shale gasoline and shale lubricating oil. In Cali- 
fornia a plant has just been developed of somewhat different 
type. It also is effective in developing all of the products 
common to oil refineries, in addition to flotation oil, of high 
grade, creosoting oil sufficient to supply the present defic- 
iency in the material for wood preservation and insecticides, 
of the grades which are the costliest and greatest in demand. 
Thus the shale industry of the United States is already lie- 
ginning to furnish every product that is characteristic of 
an oil industry, and it is also reaching out into other lines 
of usefulness, because of those constituents which ordinary 
petroleum docs not possess." 

Catlin Motor < >il is now being sold throughout California. 



And now chines along Mencken to take the edge off 
Stevenson's reputation. And why not? What right has 
Stevenson to mure gold filigree in his literary crown than 
another undeserving: Mencken rates Robert Louis dis- 
tinctly below the genius, and. accepting this, we should 
not imagine that we have not enjoyed Stevenson the less. 
It is the province of the critic to dam the gush that over- 
flows in pi 

Mencken pointed to only two or three productions, taking 
his poetry and prose together, which Stevenson wrote, that 
warrant the height of hi- reputation. We do not come out 
with this article except through the momentum of Menck- 
en's word, and though we number among the admirers of 
the author of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, the one-time edttor 
of the Smart Set has given us a thought or two on this 
subject. We have ever enjoyed Stevenson a- a genius. 
but likely have overrated him. which is a great deal more 
than might On our part be said of another writer who spent 
much time on the Western shores. This romancer of the 
cowboy and gambler, and writer of soft-tinkling poetry — 
Bret Ilarte — was inspired in literature at a strata far below 
that of Stevenson. 



Certain it is, that children should be safe in the streets. 
They had better play on the sidewalks, but if they stray 
out a few steps, there is no occasion for automobiles to 
mercilessly run them down. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 3, 1925 




Pleasure's Ww 



OBEY NO WAND BUT PLEASURES 

_ Tom Moone. 




By Katherine Schwartz 
Formerly of the "Chicago Tribune" 



CHRISTMAS Week was indeed gala week among the vari- 
ous theaters and movie houses in San Francisco, for what 
with tha opening of the New Columbia in what was the 
Old Tivoli with Mitzi in "The Magic Ring," the re-opening 
of the Capitol with Frank Egan's production of "White 
Collars," "Welcome Stranger" at the Curran, and Olga 
Petrova at the Geary St. (the old Columbia), and the movie 
houses making special efforts to give prologues in keeping 
with the holiday spirit, not to speak of the unusual offerings 
in the concert field, there was indeed something to please 
every taste. 

The Alcazar is still playing to crowded houses with "The 
Cat and the Canary," and both the Golden Gate and the 
Orpheum presented splendid bills. 

Much is promised for the coming year, the first of the 
good things promised being" the delightful comedy, "The 
Goose Hangs High," which Louis O. Macloon is bringing 
to the Curran on Sunday, January 4. 

In addition to all these, special mention must be made of 
the fine program given at the Exposition Auditorium on 
Christmas Eve under the auspices of Mayor James Rolph 
Jr., and the Board of Supervisors, assisted by the San 
Francisco Community Service. In addition to the fine 
musical program, a very elaborate and beautiful pantomime 
was given, "In Snowland," written by Mrs. John Cuddy, in 
which there appeared in addition to the adults in the cast, a 
hundred or more children of all ages, beautifully trained and 
drilled, both in the various dances and in their singing of 
the various Christmas Carols. 

Alcazar 

The starting of the eighth week of the run of "The Cat 
and the Canary" at the Alcazar next Sunday night will be 
the occasion for a special celebration. It will mark the 
return to the cast of adorable Dale Winter, leading woman 
of the Henry Duffy Players, who was forced to take a rest 
of ten days after she fainted during a matinee performance 
week before last. 

The work of Miss Winter in the role of Annabelle West 
has been one of the factors in the remarkable success of 
"The Cat and the Canary" in San Francisco. It is a difficult 
part and one strongly contrasting that of "Irene", in which 
the little actress last starred here. She plays opposite 
Henry Duffy, who is at his funniest as Paul' Jones, the 
veterinary, who has taken to doctoring automobiles instead 
of animals. Upon the shoulders of these two players rests 
the responsibility for much of the merriment which keeps 
the audience in good humor throughout the show, and 
makes them hold their seats in the exciting moments. 

Corinne Griffith Coming to Loew's Warfield 

Beautiful Corinne Griffith, beloved by theatre patrons 
throughout the world and well remembered for her recent 
success in "Black Oxen", will be with us again at Loew's 
Warfield next week in "Love's Wilderness", a widely dif- 
ferent play from anything she has given before. Ian Keith 
and Holmes Herbert are the leading men of the cast. 

"Love's Wilderness" is a thrilling romance that opens 
in the picturesque southland, moves rapidly to Canada and 
on to the Malay jungles. Miss Griffith has never done 



better emotional work than in this jungle fastness where 
she finds that her first husband is still alive and she is com- 
pelled to tell her second husband the secret she has held 
from him. 

On the stage Fanchon and Marco will offer another of 
their delightful reviews with several new additions to the 
cast in the way of musical comedy stars. 



Club Beaux Arts 

The Mid-Winter lecture series of the Club Beaux Arts will 
open with a lecture by Dr. Phyllis Ackerman, "Some Recent 
Tendencies in Painting," on Tuesday the 6th, at 2:30 p. m. 
Miss Ackerman, who is widely known as an authority on Ori- 
ental rugs (the subject of her previous lecture at the Fine 
Arts), has been touring throughout the East, visiting galleries 
of New York, Boston, Chicago, etc., and brings back with her 
a fund of interesting data on the contemporary art exhibited in 
those cities and abroad. 



Symphony Concerts — Cecilia Hansen at the Auditorium 

Cecilia Hansen, almost frail, very demure and so shy that 
one almost felt sorry for her. has surely won a place in the 
hearts of ten thousand music lovers of San Francisco; from 
her first note until the last she gave us such a treat as we 
are rarely afforded. Her perfect intonation in the melodious 
D Major Concerto for violin by Beethoven, her absolute 
assurance in the very difficult passages of the Rondo Al- 
legro movement, and her very soul inspiring reading of the 
Larghetto, not only places her as the "Peer of the Auer 
Clan," but the Peer of any Clan. 

She most graciously responded to the thundering acclaim 
of the audience with several encores — far too few to satisfy. 

The orchestral accompaniment by Mr. Hertz and his 
musicians was in itself a work of art. The symphony con- 
cert consisted of the "Phedre" Overture by Massanet, the 
well known and well loved "Unfinished Symphony" by 
Schubert, and "Fantasia Francesca de Rimini" l>v Tschai- 
kowsky, all heard here recently and given in the most ar- 
tistic manner. 

Fourth Popular Concert, Curran — Eugenia Argiewicz, 
Bern, Soloist 

In paying tribute to the world famous artists who visit 
us, let us not forget our own : Eugenia Argiewicz Bern, 
violiniste, stepping up from the ranks, as it were, to the 
spotlight, thrilled her audience Sunday with her reading of 
the very difficult and beautiful Concerto for Violin in F 
Minor by Lalo. What the audience lacked in size, due to 
heavy rainfall, it multiplied in genuine enthusiasm for this 
very efficient local artiste. 

Two other artists of the orchestra, Schipillitti, English 
horn, and Lajos Fenster, viola, won a well deserved encore 
in "In the Village" from Caucasian Sketches by Ippoliton- 
Ivanon. Perhaps the favorite of the day was' Mr. Hertz' 
own arrangement of the ever popular "Caprice Viennois" 
by Kreisler. 
Fifth Symphony Concert, Curran — Louis Persinger, Soloist 

During the holidays we have had the pleasure of hearing 
Miss Hansen, and Mr. Elman, than whom there are few 
as good, but in this concert we had the pleasure of listening 
to our own sterling concert master, Louis Persinger. We 



[anuary 3, 1925 



AND CALIF! >RNIA ADVERTISER 



sometimes doubt if San Francisco 
music lovers appreciate their privilege 
in having among us such an artist. To 
hear him play Bruch G Minor Concerto 
for Violin was a rare pleasure. His 
superb reading of the first and second 
movements is seldom, if ever, excelled, 
while his fire and display of technique 
in the Allegro Vivace Finale will be 
long remembered by those genuine 
lovers of music who appreciate the 
best. 

The novelty of the Symphony Pro- 
gram proper was Symphony No. 3, 
"Rhenish" by Schumann as arranged 
by Frederick Stock, protege of the 
revered Theodore Thomas and since 
the latter's demise, conductor of the 
Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Per- 
haps as Schumann originally arranged 
it, the instrumentation was adequate 
at that time, but certainly with the 
improved and increased instrumenta- 
tion of modern times, nothing could be 
more beautiful than these individual 
melodies as Mr. Stock has arrange.1 
them. 

The greatest artists acknowledge 
Mr. Hertz as a master in Wagner. To 
hear him read the Prelude to "Parsifal" 
is a lesson in repression and dynamics 
such as we seldom hear. 



Curran 

"Welcome Stranger," with George 
Sidney in the role of "Isadore Solomon" 
in the Aaron Hoffman comedy is a 
masterpiece. Hoffman wrote this play 
for Sidney and in it he has scored a huge 
success. There is a strong cast support- 
ing the star. This is the last week of this 
offering. 

Following "Welcome Stranger," Louis 
O. Macloon announces Lewis Beach - 
famous play, "The Goose Hangs High," 
which will open Sunday night, January 
4. This is a buoyant American comedy 
and is called the laughing hit of 1 ( >24. 

The locale of the piece is a small mid- 
western town and the story unfolds a 
tale of two doting parents who have sac- 
rificed everything to their children's wel- 
fare. The children on the Other hand. 
take all and give nothing. Suddenly the 
father meets with reverses, and the 
startling change in his family is told in 
interesting and amusing manner, 

Macloon, who has brought many suc- 
cesses io San Francisco, is very proud oi 
the fact that he has been able to bring 
"The Goose Hangs High" to play here 
at this time. It really is a scoop, for this 
production has been seen only in New 
York and Chicago. A fine cast headed by 
Cyril Keightly and Effie Ellsler will be 
seen here. 



Geary St. Theatre 

( )lga l'etrova shows herself to be a 
great emotional actress in "Hurricane." 
a strong play which she has written, an 1 
produced at the Geary St. Theatre. 



The play is the story of a woman's 
life in four episodes. During this play 
Mine, l'etrova does some splendid, and 
extremely artistic work, for although 
surrounded by a fine cast, the brunt of 
the action devolves upon her. 

It is too had that this play and this fine 
actress came into town, you might say, 
almost unheralded. The play gives one 
much food for thought, and points a 
strong and lasting moral. 



Strand 

As a holiday offering, Will King and 
his company surpassed themselves this 
week in an offering called "Hotsy Totsy," 
which only demonstrates the truth of 
"What's in a Name." 

The whole production is especially 
good, man)' clever song numbers being 
interpolated, but stress must be laid on 
the group of musical numbers consisting 
of flower songs and dances. The stage 
picture was worthy of any Broadway 
production, and the songs and dances by 
the Star Trio, Mildred Markle, Clara 
Larinoff, Blossom Sisters, Maurine 
1 'ierce, Evelyn Marion, ably assisted by 
the beautiful chorus, was a real hit. 

Will King and his inseparable partner. 
Lew Dunbar, entertain with several 
specialties, and Hermie King has a di- 
verting number entitled "Uncle Tom's 
Cabin," in which the able leader narrates 
the story, accompanied by unique musical 
effects, demonstrating the action of the 
play. 

Another treat is promised by this ever 
popular company for next week entitle 1 
"Dumb Dora." 



The New Columbia 

The Xew Columbia opening was a 

gala affair, and the gaily dressed crowd 
at the first night made one think of the 
old days of the Tivoli, when the opera 
held forth there. 

The Xew Columbia is very beautiful, 
and everything possible has been don 
the comfort of its patrons. A woman's 
lounge where smoking is permitted has 
also heen provided. 

It was most fitting to have the first 
attraction a musical comedy, and dainty 
little Mitzi in Henry Savage's "Magic 
King." won the favor of the audience at 
once. She has a line supporting com- 
pany, and there are some pretty m'Mi;-. 
Inn Mitzi herself is the magnet in this 
show. 

She will be here for another week, and 
is playing to a good business. 

,t,you pay no more* 



fiESTFLOWElg 




TTie\b)oe cfa Thousand Gardens* 

224-226 Giant te Tel Keanr; 4975 



ALCAZAR 

OTnrrell Street at Powell 

Telephone Kenrny Two 

8th His- Week Starts Snn. Eve., Jan. 4 

The most exciting Play ever written — 

THE CAT mid THK (IMHV 
By John Wiliard Staged by Ira Harris 

With 

DALE WINTER AND HENRY DUFFY 

"A Solid Evening of Merry Thrills" 



ALEXANDRIA I 

18th and Geary J 



'The Fast Set" 



CASINO 

Ellis and Mason 



"The Midnight 

Express" 

Vaudeville 



CAMEO 1 "The Fighting 

936 Market St. J Fury" 

CURRAN }" The Goose Hangs 

Geary, Nr. Mason J High" 



CALIFORNIA 

4th and Market 



"Peter Pan' 



COLUMBIA 

Eddy and Mason 



'Mitzi" 



GRANADA 

1066 Market St. 



"K, The Unknown" 



GOLDEN GATE 1 



G. G. Ave. and Tayl 



orj 



Vaudeville 



GEARY Co°,7 m e ^ I P™ 

Geary and Mason J in 'Hurricane" 



IMPERIAL 



Valentino 



1 



1077 Market St. J "The Sainted Devil" 



1 "Husbands and 



LOEWS 

WARFIELD 

988 Market St. ' Fanchon and Marco 



METROPOLITAN 



Betty Compson 
in 
2055 Union St. "The Female" 



NEW FILLMORE -D.ng.rou, 

1320 Fillmore St. J Money' 

ORPHEUM Vaudeville 
O'Farrell and Powell 



ROYAL 

1529 Polk St. 



"Sinners in 
Heaven" and 
"The Female" 



STRAND 

965 Market St. 



'Hotsy Totsy" 

with 

Will King 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 3, 1925 






The Clock Has a Word 

YOUTH, vigorous youth, has the center of the stage. 
Like other products of which we are boastfully 
proud, our Western youth is something superlative. 

Lovely girls and stalwart boys, resplendent in their 
strength, have considerable to proclaim in the way of effec- 
tive propelling power — the power which makes for the best 
we have to give to the world of industry, education, govern- 
ment, civic or economic activities. Just to look at them is 
to challenge erstwhile libeling of youth. 

"What are our boys and girls coming to?" ask crusty 
cvnics. 

'"They are not so bad," replies the old clock in the hall, 
whose pendulum marked the passing of several generations 
in families of present-day complainants. "Who are you, 
that vou should question the boys and girls of today?" And 
the pendulum swings to and fro, in its regular, syncopated 
way. 

"A lively rascal were you," champions the old hall clock. 
"You had no automobiles, but you had the old horse and 
buggy. You had no jazz, but you managed to stay out-of- 
night's. If you really want to know, the boys and girls of 
today are just as good as ever you or your associates were. 
They are a little bit better, mostly, and I'm the one who 
knows." 

There was no denying what the old clock had to say. It 
had stood in the homes of the cynic, his father and his dear 
old grandfather. For three generations had it reckoned 
time — always in the hall, where it could see and hear — 
everything. 

"Dads who take their son 'out' as often as they do their 
high-powered cars; mothers who share their time liberally 
with their daughters; families who create the home atmos- 
phere, studying, playing, working, planning, enjoying life 
together, never bother their heads with the query: 'What 
are our boys and girls coming to?' " 

The voice of the clock added philosophy to his wealth of 
definite knowledge. 

"Every right thinking son aspires to be like Dad. Every 
sweet, sensible girl believes that her own mother is the 
loveliest creation of God." 

Children idolize their parents, inwardly. If the demon- 
stration is lacking at times, I believe with the sage old clock 
in the hall — the stalwart boys and the lovely girls are just 
as good, and a little bit better, than many of their critical 
forebears. 

California is duly proud of its youth. They are the great- 
est assets of all our great and boastful possessions. 

"Who are you, Mr. Cynic, who criticize the boys and 
girls of this glorious land?" 

The clock interrupted to declare: "Nobody!" 
Betrothal Announced * * * 

The betrothal of Miss Marianne Speer Kuhn to Robert 
Gay Hooker Jr. has been announced by Mr. and Mrs. 
William S. Kuhn, parents of the bride-to-be. The wedding 
of these young people will unite two prominent families, 



By Antoinette Arnold 

well known throughout the entire state. Robert Gay 
Hooker is the son of the late Mrs. Hooker, and Robert Gay 
Hooker of San Francisco and San Mateo. 

A charming announcement was made recently of the be- 
trothal at the Kuhn home in San Mateo. Miss Kuhn is a 
sister of Katherine Kuhn, and so much do the two sisters 
resemble each other that often they are taken for twins. 
Both of the beautiful daughters are talented; their musical 
ability being part of many recent pro-rams of exceptional 
excellence. The Kuhns' social prestige in southern cities 
can be traced back to interesting historical connections. 
Colonel Jerome Hill, one of the aides of the famous General 
Robert E. Lee, of Virginia, was the grandfather of Miss 
Marianne Kuhn. 

Robert Hooker is related to Mrs. ( ieorge Lent, to Mrs. 
George Rodman Shreve, and is a nephew of Miss Jennie 
Hooker and of C. Osgood Hooker. The wedding of Miss 
Kuhn and Mr. Hooker will probably take place in June. 



Mr. Crocker's Opera 

All society, musical circles, literary colonic- and promi- 
nent men, as well as the cultural groups of two continents, 
are interested in the announcement of the new opera to be 
produced by Charles Templeton Crocker at the Opera House 
in Monte Carlo. The premiere of this opera will be given 
early in March. 

Mr. Crocker is now in Europe making preparations for 
the magnificent production, and will soon be joined by Mr.-. 
Crocker, who sails from New York, in a day or so, to join 
her husband in Paris. 

The new opera, "Fay-Yen-Fah," has an oriental motif in 
its construction. Some of the music and the lyrics were 
first heard in "The Land of Happiness," a Bohemian Grove 
play, which met with splendid success. Joseph Redding, 
who wrote the music for which Mr. Crocker created and 
elaborated a theme, is on his way to France to join the 
Crockers in the plans. According to authority, the present 
opera has been changed in so many ways, that it is prac- 
tically a ne wproduction. Many exquisite scenes of orien- 
tal loveliness will be introduced with an exotic touch of the 
East in its gorgeous settings. Charles Templeton Crocker 
is an authority on oriental art. having made an intensive 
Study of the peoples, their customs and their culture. 

* * * 
The Weatherwax Fancy Dress Ball 

The fancy dress hall given by Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Weath- 
erwax, at the Burlingame Country Club a week ago, estah- 
lishes anew the record for excellence and charm. 

Decorations skillfully placed transformed the club rooms 
into a veritable garden of towering trees and red poin- 
settias. Costumes original in design and fabric were worn 
by the guests, which included the smart set of Burlingame 
and the bay cities. 

Mrs. W. W. Crocker, Mrs. Kenneth Monteagle, Mrs. 
John Boissevain, Mrs. Walter S. Martin. Mrs. Fentriss Hill, 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter 0130 Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



] 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

O.'O BuHh Street, Between Powell and Stockton, Son FrnnclMoo 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



January 3, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



of the 



Mrs. Walker Kamm, Mrs. William Deveraux, 
Mrs. Frederick Hussey. Mrs. Robert Hays 
Smith, the Misses Edith ami Josephine Grant 

were among those complimented For their dis- 
tinctive attire. 

Many dinners were given before the mem- 
orable party. 

Costumes were elaborate and many of them 
carried the motif of humor, Mr. Stanford Gwin 
being pronouncedly novel. The upper part of 
his costume impersonated an old lady and the 
lower, a dashing ballet girl. 

Six Russian Cossacks entered the ballroom 
together, creating exclamations of surprise and 
astonishment. They were Mrs. George Cameron, 
Mrs. Robert Hays Smith, Mrs. Joseph Oliver 
Tobin, Mr. Walter Martin, Mr. Edmunds Lyman 
and Mr. William Tevis, Jr. 
* # * 

Mr. and Mrs. Horace W. Morgan gave a 
handsome dinner dance at the Hotel St. Francis 
recently to entertain the friends of the son, 
William Morgan, one of the juniors of society. 
There were about a hundred and fifty guests, 
many being also Miss Eleanor Morgan's friend: 
older set. 

It was a dinner dance, the guests being seated at tables 
decorated in the prevailing colors of the season. Approxi- 
mately the same coterie will be entertained at a dancing 
party given by Mrs. Frederick Hope Beaver, who is enter- 
taining for her son, Peter Beaver, a student at Stanford, 
Class of '26. 

* * * 

Miss Alfreda Sbarboro was hostess this week at two 
affairs at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Sbar- 
boro. She entertained a school girl contingent at tea. hav- 
ing 100 guests, many of them her schoolmates from the 
Sacred Heart College at Menlo Park. 

In the evening Miss Sbarboro had eighty guests to a 
dance. A large receiving party assisted at each of the two 
parties. Pouring at the handsomely arranged tea table \\ ere 
Miss Bernice Balcom and Miss Alice Boyd. 

<■■ * * 

Miss Carol King, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William A. 
Klink, and one of the popular girls attending Stanford 
University, is at home enjoying the round of diversions for 
the school set. Miss Betty Klink, who attended school in 
the East, is home for the winter. 

The Misses Dorothy and Pegg) Roeding were hostesses 

at a dancing party on January 2 in honor of Mis- l>ai~v 

Parsons. Ii was Held at the Woman's Athletic Club. 

* * * 

Dr. and Mrs. William E. Stevens gave a handsome 
(. hristmas dance nn Saturday night last to entertain friends 
of their daughter, Miss Stella Stevens, who is a student at 
Mdls College. A number of her school friends. Eastern girls, 
were included in the invitation list. 




HOTEL, CANTERBURY 
750 Sutter Street 

San Francisco's Finest 

Family Hotel 

250 Rooms 

Kates: From $2.50 per day 



CAFE MAROUARD: 



i 



L 










~^~lfiP 


tj_i- j 


" T 




'In 1 

n A(B) 'LI 




"4 


al 














flic*' "Ti 




ilrale?* 


rt -~-^"\ '" 




W: 


-pVfff, 



Adjoin Ins Co ind Curran 

Theaters, Qeary .inri Mason. 

Phone Prospect 61 

Brilliant Revue Directed by 
Jack Holland 

Pretty Girls 

< 'lever Entertainment 

Excellent Cuisine 

Sfirtiiil Dinnrry 
Aitcr Theater Suppers 



Another party of Saturday night for Marin 
County families was given at the lovely home of 
Mr. and Mrs. E. X. llarmou, in Belvedere. The 
Harmon home, on the island hill, commands a 
panoramic view of the Alameda, San Francisco 
and Marin County shore lines. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Watt Miller (Elizabeth 
Folger) had their second son christened Paul 
Albert at a ceremony last Saturday at St. Mary's 
Cathedral. Miss Elena Folger was the child's 
godmother ond Albert Miller the godfather. The 
two sponsors are aunt and uncle to the baby, who 
is the grandchild of Mr. and Mrs. C. O. G. Miller 
and Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Folger. 

A reception of fifty or more guests followed 
the christening at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Miller, every one drinking toasts to the little 
newcomer. 

* * * 

William Adam McGee Jr. will claim Miss 
Edith Grant as his bride the second week in Feb- 
ruary. The ceremony promises to be one of the 
most important social events of the late winter, 
with hundreds of society folk from about the bay in attendance. 

(Continued on Page 20) 

WHERE TO DINE 

Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

THE MOST POPULAR RESTAURANT IN SAN FRANCISCO 
05 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4536 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners. $1.25. Meals Served a la Carte. 

Also Regular French and Italian Dinners. 

Fish anil Game a Specialty 



BLANCO'S 



O'Farrell and I.nrkin Streets 



Phone Franklin 



No visitor should leave the city without dining 

in the finest cafe in America 

Luncheon 111:30 to 2 p. in.) _____ 7:,,. 

Dinner. Week Days _-----_ $1.50 

Dinner. Sundays and Holidays - - - - _ yi.75 



The only real artistic place in the Latin Quarter. Bohemian 

dinner. 75c — served every evening. Saturday, Sunday and 

Holidays, $1.25. Dancing from 7 to 1 every evening. 

BEGIN'S BOLOGNA RESTAURANT 



240 Columbus Avenue 



Phone Sutter 8825 



Louis Cerles. Jean Barrere, John Piegth. Props. 

NEW SHARON GRILL 

Formerly Bergez-Frank's Old Poodle Dog, Bush Street 

XT. NEW MONTGOMERY STREET 

Opposite Palace Hotel Phone Sutter 880S 




Mary Hereth Caroline Jones 

Luncheon is served from 11 :30 to 2:30 
and tea from 3 to 5 



oni 



334 Sutter St. 



Dolclas 7118 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

.... Third VM-nur. <-VN II AT BO 



Featuring- Southern Cooking 
Open From 
11:30 a. m. to 8:30 p. m. 
p. m. to 8:30 p. m. 
nd Holidays 
■ ]>. m. only 
. i 08BO K\ ESI MONO % . 

Il.lf Kl.M-k frnm B JftfcWJ 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 3, 1925 






financial; 



By Edward H. Manning 

DURING the last few weeks, the Pacific Coast section 
of the United States has been busy purchasing- three 
per cent more than it bought in the corresponding weeks 
of last year. Over the same period, the other sections have 
bought about two per cent more. We have been able to 
spend more because we have earned more in proportion 
than others, not because we have been more extravagant ; 
a fact proved by the other. little fact that our per capita 
wealth is greater today than it was a week ago, greater 
than ever before. Our wealth is attracting the attention 
of the whole world, has of late been the subject of articles 
in the foreign press devoted to suggestions that it should 
be exploited by foreign manufacturers. Contributors to the 
Trade Supplements of The London Times have been going 
so far as to advise readers that San Francisco, rather than 
New York, should be the goal of business men. We have 
known this for a long time, were too modest to tell others. 
When your Britisher has waked up to a condition, he gets 
real busy in his ramrod way. So we may expect an inva- 
sion in earnest of the best he has to offer. 

* * * 

— In spite of denials, I adhere to all I have said concern- 
ing the real powers behind the throne, in the matter of the 
Great Western-San Joaquin Power Merger. Who was the 
real buyer of the Fleishhacker interests? 1 do not mean the 
intermediary. And what does Rudolph Spreckels think 

about the Eastern intrusion? 

* * * 

— "Pacific Business" for December is again before me. 
I remember when the first number came out. I was rather 
sorry for the publisher, Mr. Baley. Because he was taking 
a big chance, expecting the solid work he was doing to be 
appreciated. He must have need of all the grit in his make- 
up, to stick it out. He is surely to be congratulated on 
arriving. I do not agree with all he has to say in his 
Summary of Pacific conditions, but he gives strong sup- 
porting facts, and everyone who has the interests of Cali- 
fornia at heart should subscribe — and read. Address, For 
specimen copy, Crocker Bank Building, San Francisco. 

— An interesting article from the pen of Charles ]. Diet- 
ing, Executive Vice-President of the Wells Fargo Bank and 
Union Trust Company, appears in the Annual Number of 
"The Argonaut". The Living Trust is his theme, winner 
in the popularity race. For a meticulous remuneration the 
Trust Department of the bank will attend to all the routine 
work of your investments; will attend to the buying and 
selling of securities, handling real estate in the same man- 
ner; will collect income of any sort whatsoever; will make 
up your income and other tax returns. Further, arrange- 
ments can be made for continuing supervision when other 
spheres call you away. It means that the business man 
can devote undivided attention to the making of new 
money, leaving to the trust company the job of caring for 
what he wishes to put aside. It is really surprising how 
little most people know about the business of a trust com- 
pany. 

* * * 

— San Francisco's imports of toys are growing every year, 
from foreign countries as well as from our eastern states, 
Why are we so backward in their manufacture? Surely 
children should know something about making toys. 

(Continued on Page 2n i 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

i lately the san fr^cisco savings and loan coz'.zty) 

savings c:mm^rcial 

INCORPOrvATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of tlie Oldest BanKsin California, 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

by mergers or co-.- .11 '-.ionsw'th other 3anks. 

Member Associated £av;r:^s Car:ks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



DECEMBER 31st, 1924 

Assets 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 

Employees' Pe-sion Fu-H 



C96 917,170.69 

4 003.000.00 

461,746.52 



MISSION URANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HA1GHT STREET BRANCH Haicht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Porta! Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (4J4) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 
Paid Up Capital $20,000,000 $20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued. CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES 
THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 
PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

San FranciHCO Ofllce: 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Aast. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 
Walter W. Derr, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douglas 2244 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



"The Largest Fire Insurance 
Company in America" 

Fire, Automobile, Windstorm. 
Tourists' Baggage Insurance 
: : REASONABLE RATES 



W. W. HEALEY 
NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 
208 Crocker Building (Opposite Palace Hotel) San Francisco 
Phone Kearny 391 



"Mayerle's Eyewater" 

For 30 years the most popular Eye Tonic 
for children and adults... At <lruKcis(s ?<'<*-, 
by mall 70c. 

George Mayerle, Expert Optician, 960 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 




January 3, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA Al>\ ERTISER 



11 



Wheat and Chaff 

By Nathaniel Anderson 




W! 



"HO read the Reports of 
the U. S. National Mu- 
seum ? Not many, it is safe to 
say. On the other hand, it is to 
be commented that those who 
do not know of the yearly issue 
of the Smithsonian book would 
be pleased and interested to see 
one. Peeping within there is 
found much of birds, insects, 
flora, fauna, ethnology, archae- 
ology, etc., with text and illus- 
tration. 

Here, no doubt, is some text- 
matter for a new issue of the 
museum's report: A forty-four 
word letter in the eye of a 
needle was received by the In- 
stitute as a missive. We give 
it in full : 
"This is a crude, hurriedly prepared, large sample of 
micro-engraving. I trust it will contain a moment of inter- 
est to the regents, and regret that time prevents preparing 
an exhibition more worthy of their inspection. Believe 
me, yours cordially, Alfred McEwen." 

The National Museum is under the direction of the Smith- 
sonian Institute, and the large, fulsome book it publishes 
can be found in second-hand book stores priced at about 
from fifty cents to one dollar. 



Nathaniel Anderson 



not with his money. I can still remember the old song with 
the same relish of its humor, "I owe ten dollars to O'Grady, 
he thinks he has a mortgage on me life " 

* * * 

1 know girls who will not accept alimony, and Judge 
Graham says it is getting to be an idea out of date to 
consider it just the thing to mulct all a woman can from the 
former mate. 

* * * 

"A man is never older than he feels," declared the ancient 
beau, bravely. "Now I feel as fresh as a two-year-old." 
"Horse or egg?" asked the sweet young thing brightly. 

* * * 

Cora — She's always able to get a new hat. How does she 
manage it? 

Laura — Oh, she just calls at her husband's office in a thing 
she makes herself. 

* * * 

Crabshaw — You're very careful when you see a pedestrian 
crossing the street. 

Speedwell — Yes, I have a new car ami I don't want to ge' 
any dents in the mudguards. 



Barbecue 

Chili Con Cnrm.* 
Coffee 




Enchiladas 

Tamales 

llroileil Steaks 



Red Bull Pit 

72 EDDY STREET, San Francisco 
JOE W. ANDERSON, Prop. Telephone Douglas 6198 



Why is it so many of us find our souls etherealized in 
writing and reading American Indian subject-matter, and 
so many more of us don't even give the Indian his due, nor 
treat him humanely? Read Mrs. Neman's poem, based on 
life from an actual incident. "The Indian and His Child." 
The Indian was so neglected while his offspring was dying, 
that when the end came, he carried his dead child far away 
from his white neighbors, to the mountains of his people. 
There he wanted to bury it. among the scenes of pleasanter 
memories. 



\\ e are all. or too near the number of all, inclined to take 
the attitude of master over the "slave." Freedom, in thought. 
actions and emotions is a fine thing, and the very notion 
of it hits us hard on the head. It works inside a bit, but 
does not seem to take proper root there. It is too ill-nour- 
ished by our notions and dispositions to become a part of 
us. The occasions bring out more natural inclinations. 
Who is considerate to a remarkable extent in the office, 
factory or store of the under-man's time or his nature? 
Some, yes, hut how many, beyond the exact point at where 
present social and labor conditions compel him? How far 
really goes warm enthusiasm for the other man's freedom? 
Our plaguey natures do not prevent us from being kind 
often, but after that, we want to rule a man's life, if we 
can. at least so far and during the time of any little obliga- 
tion due. A good fellow lends some money to a friend who 
is down on his fortune, and until the money is paid he 
seems to think he must regulate the other's affairs — or his 
life. He watches if the debtor goes to the theatre, lest he 
be extravagant, and notices when the unfortunate comes 
out of the grocery store with his bundles. He does 
want the poor shorthanded one to overfeed Ins children — 



Golden Gate Ferry Company 

FOOT OF HYDE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
WINTER SCHEDULE 

TIME TABLE 

EFFECTIVE OCTOBER 15, 1924 



Leave Sa 


usalito 


Leave 


San Francisco 


A.M. 


P.M. 


(Hyde Street) 


6:00 


12:30 


A.M. 


P.M. 


6:30 


1:00 


6:30 


12:30 


7.00 


1:30 


7:00 


1:00 


7:30 


2:00 


7:30 


1:30 


8:00 


3:00 


8:00 


2:00 


8:30 


4:00 


8:30 


2:30 


9:00 


4:30 


9:00 


3:30 


9:30 


6:00 


9:30 


4:30 


10:00 


5:30 


10:00 


6:00 


10:30 


6:00 


10:30 


5:30 


11:00 


6:30 


11:00 


6:00 


11:30 


7:00 


11:30 


6:30 


12:00 


7:30 


12:00 


7:00 




8:0( 




7:30 




8:30 




8:00 




9:00 




8:30 




9:30 




9:00 




10:30 




9:30 




11:30 




10:00 
11:00 
12:00 


Special 


Service When 


Traffic Reqi 


irements 




Make Ne 


cessary. 




Golden Gate F 


erry C 


ompany 



12 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 3, 1925 






$Q £Men of ^Moment gy 

ON THE TRAIL OF TONNINGSEN 



By Eleanore F. Ross 



When all is said and done, people may be divided into two 
classes : the kind who observe, who "read between the 
lines," and the kind who fail to see even that which is before 
their eyes. You may be thrown into contact with a man or 
woman "full of years" and the dignity which age should 
always bring with it, and one may be eloquent with the 
richness of wide and varied experience, while the other may 
be stupid and voiceless of any particular wisdom that time 
might have endowed him with. 

One is alive and virile with that strange spark which 
we call magnetism (for want of a better word), and the 
other is as cold and speechless as the proverbial clod. 



history of this community has passed before his eyes like a 
wonderful moving- picture — full of adventure, tragedy, com- 
edy — all of the different stages through which a commercial 
center must go, as it evolves from a primitive mining town 
into the stature of a great metropolis. And this kaleidoscopic 
picture has given of its color — its Western commingling of 
fire and good nature, pathos and fun, labor and play, tears 
and laughter, to the life of this San Francisco trail blazer. 
* * * 

John Tonningsen was born in Schleswig-Holstein on 
November 4th, 1854; after finishing school he went to sea 
in a "windjammer" from Hamburg, around the Cape of 



<? y 9 



?V '/<■ 




John Tonnlnescn, at the nee <>f seventy yen™ nml "In 
when he wan twenty-one." 



ihi- brave iI«.vn 



When I first saw John Tonningsen in his apartments at 
the St. Francis Hotel, I felt immediately that here was a 
man, seventy years young, whom life had enriched with 
many different phases and pictures, all of which had par- 
ticipated in the making of a veritable "man of the world." 

Fifty years a citizen of San Francisco (with the excep- 
tion of a two-year trip around the world), the dramatic- 



Good Hope to the East Indies, Siberia, Northern China, 
Southern China and Japan. After a stay of two years in the 
Orient, he came to San Francisco December 22nd, 1874, 
on the British steamer "Vasco da Gama." He went into 
the shipping supply business here, and in 1886 changed to 
mining and real estate. 

In 1876 he married .Miss Lizzie Moebus, a native daugh- 



January 3, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



ter of Stockton, who passed away after a short illness, in 
1903. He was burned out in 1906, but the fire was instru- 
mental in creating a second romance, for it was through this 
calamity that he met Mrs. Pierre G. Sumps, also a refugee, 
and their marriage was consummated in ( )ctober of 1906. 

A honeymoon trip of two years around the world brought 
the Tonningsens back to California, both of them concluding 
that no European province or state could compare with 
our Golden State, and no city or town with our good gray 
city by the sea. 

Mr. Tonningsen's parents, three brothers and one sister 
came to California in 1873 and settled in Modoc County ; 
an elder brother came to this state in 1870. This pioneer 
can boast of five nephews in the late war, most of them 
becoming officers, and all of them having originally enlisted. 
All of the Tonningsens are enthusiastic Californians, who 
believe there is no place on God's green earth like the state 
of their adoption. 

Mr. Tonningsen has been president of the Union State 
Bank, and now holds the positions of president of the Mount 
Diablo M. and M. Company of Nevada, the Colma Land 
Association of San Mateo County, and has been a stock- 
holder in the Dollar Steamship Co. from its inception. He 
is a Mason, Past Master of Oriental Lodge No. 144, F. 
A. M., Past High Priest of California Chapter No. 5 R. 
and A. M., Past Eminent Commander of California Com- 
mandery No. 1 K. T., and Past Patron of California Chap- 
ter No. 183 Order of the Eastern Star; was a former Trustee 
of the Masonic Widows' and Orphans' Home, and of both 
the old and the new Masonic Hall Associations, and a mem- 
ber of Islam Temple of the Mystic Shrine. 

He was decorated with the Cross of the Grand Orient of 
England and Wales by King Edward VII of Great Britain, 
for his active and efficient participation in the Triennial 
Templar Conclave of 1904. 

In the fifty years that have rolled by since Mr. Tonning- 
sen first beheld San Francisco, the changes have been in- 
numerable ; amusements, politics, social customs, cafe life, 
the gay and serious sides of a big city, the conditions that 
make up these metropolitan attributes, show a different 
phase and coloring than those in the early seventies. And 
here was a man who had observed and absorbed these 
extraordinary changes. 

"Amusements?" repeated Mr. Tonningsen, "Well, Piatt's 
Hall, where the Mills Building now stands, was a great 
place for Sunday evening dances, and very respectable 
people, I can tell you, used to patronize it. The Winter- 
garten, which place was later rebuilt for the Pacific Union 
Club, and again after the fire, by the Plaza Hotel, was also 
a very popular place as a Sunday evening dance hall. In 
those days the whole family would go out together, Father, 
mother, sons and daughters, and enjoy themselves. How 
different it is now! This building was afterward used as 
a light opera and concert hall. 

"The Krelling Bros, opened a place of. amusemenl at the 
corner of Sutter and Stockton Streets, called the Tivoli 
Gardens. This was where many a fine concert took place, 
and where the first ladies' orchestra played in San Fran- 
cisco. Later the Krellings built a theater on Eddy Street. 
where the Tivoli now stands, and gave concerts, opening 
the house with "Pinafore." An entrance fee of 25 cents 
was charged, which entitled the holder to a glass of beer. 
The patrons sat around tables, chatted and visited, and a 
spirit of camaraderie prevailed which one doesn't see in 
these days at playhouses. Then came the California and 
the Bush Street Theater, which were the best at that time 
until the Wade's Opera House and the Baldwin Theater 
were built. 

"At Wade's were heard the meat tenor. Wachtel : Mme. 
Fabri, the soprano; Jacob Mullcr. considered the finest bari- 
tone of his time; here also we heard Patti, Nicolini (her 
husband, and Schalcev. the contralto, in "Aida." Christine 



Nielson also sang in this playhouse. Later it was renamed 
the Grand Opera House, and was used for opera occasion- 
ally, but eventually was turned into a cheap theater by the 
elder Morosco, who was a figure around town, in his bar- 
ouche, with a team of beautiful black horses and two foot- 
men. 

"The Baldwin was the theater, with James ( 1'Xeil, Lewis 
Morrison, Mrs. Jeffreys Lewis and Elenore Carey in the 
stock company. Mr. Lewis played "East Lynne" to a 
S. R. O. house, and not a dry eye in the theater. Then 
came the Alcazar on O'Farrell Street, where the Hippo- 
drome now stands. 

"So much for theaters. In the matter of cafes, San Fran- 
cisco was world renowned in the early days for its wonder- 
ful eating places. The Poodle Dog at Dupont and Bush 
Streets was famous for its cuisine and wines, and Blanco's 
Poodle Dog Restaurant at Eddy and Mason Streets was 
considered the smartest restaurant anywhere on the whole 
globe. Then we had Marchand's at Stockton and Geary 
Streets, and other French restaurants in that neighborhood, 
all of the best. Mr. Techau converted a church on Mason 
Street into a restaurant, which became all the rage.. 

"Social amenities were carried on very differently in 
those days from the way we do things now. The polo- 
naise, the waltz, the lancers and quadrille were favorites, 
but we also had Spanish dances, the schottische, Virginia 
reel and the polka .What could be more graceful than the 
waltz quadrille, or the minuet? Dances which we do not 
see any more on the ballroom floor. 

"The Cliff House and Uncle Tom's Cabin down at San 
Bruno, the rendez-vous for many a gay party, but you had 
to have a team to get there, and a fat pocketbook was an 
essential for those two places. The Fountain was a great 
place for entertainment and wonderful meals, where the 
Sutter Hotel now stands. It was the largest and most at- 
tractive place in the whole city, and there is nothing- like it 
at present. The Palace was considered the finest hotel in 
the world for many years, with the Baldwin a close second. 
Iji many places a splendid chicken dinner was served for 
the small sum of 25 cents, with wine, and if you tried to tip 
you would get into trouble, except in French restaurants. 

"Those were the days of elegance." went on Mr. Ton- 
ningsen, reminiscently. "To my mind nothing in the way 
of autOS can ever compare with the beautiful horses and 

turn-outs that used to drive along Golden Gate Avenue to 
the Park and Cliff, and people seemed to have more leisure, 
and there was more repose of manner than one sees today. 
"Politics? Well, I suppose the political situation has im- 
proved, but sometimes I think that a political boss like old 
Chris Buckley, who kept down taxes for years to $1.00 a 
hundred, would be a good thing for the city." 
* * * 

On December 22nd, 1924, which was the 50th anniversary 

of his arrival in San Francisco. Mr. Tonningsen gave a ban- 
quet at his apartment at the St. Francis Hotel, where he 
and Mrs. Tonningsen have resided for the last fifteen years, 
and where they have entertained their numerous friends. 
The following guests were present: 

Hon. W. W. Morrow Hon. Frank W. Kerrigan 

Hon. W. II. Waste Captain Robert Dollar 

Hon. Thomas J. Lennon Mr. A. P. Giannini 

Dr. Francis F. Knorp Dr. Win. C. Hassler 

Dr. Herbert T. Moore Col. Frank W. Marston 

Mr. Charles E. Gree Mr. Samuel Pauson 

Mr. Benard Lowe Mr. Frederick D. Hihn 

Mr. Herbert E. Law Mr. Charles Tonningsen 

Mr. Hugh Campbell Mr. Thomas P. Andrews 

Mr. F. W. G. Moebus Mr. I. II. Xewbauer 

Mr. Sanford Sachs Mr. Samuel A. Clarke 

Mr. Donzel Stonev Mr. K M. J. Armstrong 

Mr. Richard Miller Mr. ( icrge Leibold 

Hon. Frank C. Svkes Mr. Win. Woodfield, Jr. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 3, 1925 




]\BR$P "RBLE 




By KEM 
"Books for children and books for adults . . . overlap. In 
bookshops as in libraries, it has long since been proved Imprac- 
ticable to attempt to place all the juvenile literature in one room, 
all the adult literature In another. The two streams persist in 
mingling. Therefore the prime requisite is that readers should 
have access to a selection so broad that they — children and adults 
alike — may ride forth to make their own discoveries In the land 1 
of high adventure." — C. S. M. Editorial, 1923. 

THIS is the gift-giving season and nothing pleases the 
average child more than a well-chosen book, and there 
are scores and scores of new titles and new authors wise in 
the psychology of childhood. Certain books that never go 
out of fashion — that the child will read with pleasure too, 
when grown, are recommended by the thoughtful little lady 
of the Juvenile Departments, viz., Kenneth Grahame's 
Wind In The Willows, Hudson's Little Boy Lost, Alice In 
Wonderland, by Carroll. In The Secret Garden, by Frances 
Hodgson Burnett ; also there is much demand for books by 
California authors at this season and we are shown — 

Injun Babies — Stories and Drawings, by Maynard Dixon, 
the well-known artist, which came out in 1923, a very 
artistic book that will both please and instruct young 
children. G. P. Putnam Sons, $1.75. 

The Bear Family At Home, by Curtis D. Wilbur, the 
Secretary of the Navy, which is all about circuses and very 
real live bears, who escape from them to lead wonderful 
free, wild lives in fascinating caves. 

(New edition '23) The Bobbs-Merrill Company, $1.75. 

Why The Chimes Rang, is by Professor Raymond Mac- 
Donald Alden, who has just died and was formerly with 
Stanford University. He was the son of "Pansy", who. 
wrote delightful children stories. His own stories are 
literary gems, charmingly illustrated by Katherine Sturges ; 
the sort to make a universal appeal because of their interest, 
beauty and truth. There is a new edition just out this year. 

Bobbs-Merrill, $2.50. 

Redcoat and Minuteman, by Bernhard Marshall, is the 
third story in the series of romances dealing with the great 
periods of the Anglo-Saxon struggle for freedom. It is a 
story of the Revolutionary War and is exciting reading for 
both young people and grown-ups, and complete in itself, if 
one cares for but one of these very worth-while period 
stories. The Appleton Press, $2.50. 

Recitations — Old and New — For Boys and Girls, by 
Grace Gaige, is one of the very useful and attractive books 
just off the press this year. The introduction is by Chris- 
topher Morley who quotes : "The air of the New World," 
says Joseph Conrad in Nostromo, "seems favorable to the 
art of declamation." There are poems for the very Little 
Ones; poems about Birds and Animals; Flowers and Sea- 
sons;- Humor; Patriotism; Mother's Day, and for every 
well-known day and season ; — old favorites and new — 
chosen with care to please, and for use as recitations from 
the best of well-known authors. Whoi wouldn't want to 
hear the small boy recite this one by Edgar A. Guest? 

"The Radio 

Since pa put in the radio we have a lot of fun, 
We hustle to my room upstairs as soon as supper's dune 
And Pa he tinkers with the disks to get it loud and clear, 
Then says: 'Wait just a moment now, there's nothing yet 

to hear. 
Oh, now it's coming! Silence there! Now don't you move 

a thing. 
Say Ma, this is a marvellous age — a lady's going to sing!" 



Pa put that radio in for me — at least he told me so, 
But if it's really mine or not, is something I don't know, 
'Coz Pa he wants it all himself, to hear the funny things, 
And Ma must hear the concerts through when some great 

artist sings, 
But when the parson starts to talk on Selfishness and Sin, 
Pa says: 'Now it has come the time for you to listen in.' " 
Appleton and Company, $3.00. — Edgar A. Guest. 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

^PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 

239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



Make yourself at home at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tillmann Place, at 241 Grant Ave. 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Rare Books — First Editions — Fine Bindings 

Importations from Zachnsdorf, Root, Morrell, etc., of London 

Commissions in London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

Phone Kearny 5816 



r - •— ~-"~ 




■—»————» " — »«■-••••■■—» 


Be Photographed Th 


is Year 


on Your Birthday 


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STUDIOS IN ALL 

PRINCIPAL CITIES OP 

CALIFORNIA 


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Oakland 
408 14th Street 


.— — — — — — —— — — — — — — — — — — — . 


San Francisco 
41 Grant Avenue 

------- 



Established 28 Years 

EXTRA HAIR 
COVER THE BOB F0R 
EVENING WEAR 

NOW BEING SHOWN AT 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

815 Clement Street San Francisco 360 Geary Street 

2331 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley 
MR. AND MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 



St. Mary's Academy 



SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 

For particulars address 
SISTER SUPERIOR 



Select Boarding and Day School Under the 
Direction of the Sisters of St. Dominic 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Sult» Preaaed By Hnnd Only-- Suit* Called For and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

PARISIAN DYEING AND CLEANING 



521 Poat Street 
In Virginia Hotel 



San Franclaco 
Phone Franklin 2510 



January 3. 1 ( '25 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




By Hoot McGregor 
Joe Whalen promises to be there with his trusty niblick. 



Charlie Weld says the reason he did not play last month was 
because he wanted to find out how many more shot over 150. 



Frank Klimm has gone in for midnight golf. He uses illu- 
minated balls. 



Anse Dalziel, while practicing for the tournament, broke 
four windows in his bathroom. 



Ross Clark is going to bring a steam boiler so that he can 
produce energy enough to get over the ditch on the 10th hole. 



Billy Monihan hopes to finish in the first three this month. 
Billy shoots a consistent game. 



Bennett, of the U. S. Steel, is having all his irons case- 
hardened. 



Bill Goss says to watch his smoke this month. ( letting ready 
to collect that $30, Bill? 



Austin Sperry expects to play the full course in "A Flat" 100. 



Claude Alexander, the singing secretary, sang a beautiful 
score, accompanied by his brassie. 



"Grandpa" Charlie Goodwin carries around a bag full of 
clubs, but all he ever uses is a spoon and a putter. 



Jack Ellery was there outfitted for shooting ducks, but he 
compromised by shooting down the fairways. 



Jack Houston said he was a cinch to win until be started 
playing rough on the 7th. 



Bill Carson said he made two pars on the second. Course 
par is 4 and Bill made an X. 



Van Lyons was driving so far that he carried a pair of pocket 
binoculars to watch the hall's flight. 

Joe Moore was driving his putts so well that he turned to 
the genial dentist. "Doc" Browne, and said: "What do you 
think is the matter with me?" and "Doc," who was having 
trouble of his own. answered: "Open your mouth, please." 



"Beau Brummel" Barter was looking for friends I ?). lie 

wanted to bet on every hole. 



Norman Kidwell played a wonderful game in the traps, lie 
was seen on his knees twice. 



It sure looked good to see genial "Jerry" Brooks hack an 
the job. He looks much better with a mashie in his hand than 
he would with a lib'. 



'Pants" Poheim did his usual sailor's horn-pipe when driving. 
(Continued on I 



[COOKS] 



TICKETS ISSUED 

To All 

PARTS OF THE WORLD 

INCLUSIVE INDEPENDENT TOURS 
ITINERARIES FURNISHED 

CRUISES SUPREME 

MEDITERRANEAN 
Leaving New York January 24, 1925 

ROUND THE WORLD 
Leaving New York January 22, 1925 

Write tor Booklets 



128 Sutter Street 



San Francisco 



"Negligees 
and Lingerie" 



witli its attractive models and alluring garments will 
prove an Interesting pace to the ladies, while the men 
will probably lie more interested in the movie stars who 
latured in this Issue. There are some unusual pic- 
tures from 

"Out of 
the West" 

Many prominent personages are featured "Among the 
Great and Beautiful": there is a wide variety of notables 
"In the Puhlic Eye": a page showing "The Sports of 
Amateurs." and BOme unique views taken "On Penguin 
Isle." Everyone will like the 



Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 3, 1925 



(Continued from rage 15) 
Harry Speas says the next thing the Railroad Commission 
will try and cut is his golf score. 

Rigo DeLuca was heard to remark that he expected to bring 
in a couple of birdies. What kind, Rigo, eagles or turkeys? 

Marshall Scobey still reigns as king of the 19th hole. 

Jack Percy played the whole course in his best Superior 
Court manner. 



When 'Doc" Sherman crossed the gully on the 8th he said : 
"Let us pray, this is where I broke the best mashie I ever 
owned." 



Charlie Ash says it is far easier to putt the little white ball 
in the cup, than it' is to put a wild apricot in a can. 

Reginald Meller was kept busy trying to get his score low 
enough to suit his artistic temperament. 

Walter Hood, the pride of California Street, says he did not 
need a bit of help to add his score. 

Hal Ballantine, who's motto is: "Tis a feat to fit feet," is 
talking of having rubber heels put on his woods. 

Fred Small broke a record by talking to his partners all 
along the course, but all he said was "Yes" and "No." 

Andrew Nelson says it pays to drink his buttermilk. He 
refers to his score as proof. 



Louis Thymes shot a wonderful game. Is it because you 
shaved the mustache, Lou? 



Dudley Fish was kept busy arguing with all the boys about 
their handicap. 



Line Johnson says that while lie and Rod Guyett were in 
Los Angeles, he captured a little golf and he is now training it 
in the way it should go. 

Bill Davis shot a 77 but refuses to tell what he made on the 
second nine. 



Roy Staniford sure hits 'em a mile 



Flerb Bilsborough is showing a much better form on the 
jreens. He now weighs only 247. 



"Doc" Pierce hasn't been playing much golf since he got 
married. What's the matter. Doc? 



TUSTIN RADIO 



RADIO SALES — Receiving and Transmitting Specialist 

SUPPLIES — Special Radio Apparatus Built to Order 

Service — Repairing — Inspection. The New De Forest D. 12 

Replex Radio-Phone now on display and attracting more than 

ordinary interest, $169.50 complete. -:- Convenient Terms. 

Phone Garfield 6972 
Our New Location — 428 Sutter Street, San Francisco. Calif. 



Experienced, reliable Real Estate man will manage and I 

develop large Realty holdings or administer office. building or j 

apartment houses. Rents properly collected and remitted. J 

Reasonable percentage. Highest references. Bond furnished j 
superior to cash handled. 

L. C. TAMM, 628 Montgomery Street 



The January FUR jALl at Gassner's 

GASSNER STANDARDS very definitely estab- 
lish the exceptional importance of this occasion. 
All the Gassner Furs included — all the fur 
coats, all the fur wraps, all the fur jacquettes, all the 
fur neckpieces. 

Reductions to 50% 

LOUIS GASSNER 

Incorporated 

112-114 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

"The new store that is 32 years old" 



TRADEMARK. -_- -»- j*^ , < 

M||C Motor Oils 




Are recognized by the highest authorities in engine 
building as the most economical, efficient and uniform in 
quality — 

A PURE PENNSYLVANIA PRODUCT 

VALVOLINE OIL COMPANY 



462 Bryant St., San Francisco 



122 Center St., Los Angeles 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think thai a vigoroun brush) up once or twice a day 1h 
taking very good care of them. Urushlng Ik only a part of the 
process. Many things can happen to your teeth which only n 
competent dentist can take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as you imagine. A toothache means 
trouble; do not wait for the ache. Watch your teeth and guins. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth sore? Do your guuiK blCedf Call In today 
and talk it over. It will cost nothing. My nerve blocking sys- 
tem blocks off all nerves and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfield 335 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crowns; Sell Cleaning Bridges; 

Porcelain Work and Roofless Plates* 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE TOUR CARS WASHED AND GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per day; 97.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage of Automobiles 



ARE YOUR BRAKES SAFE? 

We Specialize on Brakes Only— Flat Prices on All Cars 

S. F. BRAKE SERVICE 

ST. FRANCIS GARAGE, 1240 POST STREET 

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Phone Prospect 1915 

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Metal Work Apper- 
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hiles — Oxy-Acetylene 
Welding — II I a c k- 




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AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



fanuary 3, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller 
National Automobile Club 

THE WINTER'S CHARM 

When chilly Winter plays the lead 

.And tramps about the stage 
And storms and roars and struts about 

To amplify his rage, 
The timid tourist quits his car 

And takes to toe and heel 
And longs for spring and summer suns 

That mean glad days awheel. 
But he who tours in snow or rain 

\\ lien sunny skies are rare 
Enjoys the thrill of all the year 

In weather foul and fair. 
The clanking chains their music lend 

Like sleigh-hells in the snow, 
The charm of New Year's melody 

Wherever he may gi I. 
The patter of the falling rain. 

The north wind's whining song 
Are harmonies of Winter-tide 

That follow fast along. 
From meadow wide and rolling hill 

From mountain and from dale 
The rainbows rise to greet the sun 

That robes of mist enveil. 
Go view the forests as the rain 

Bedews each leafy bed 
( >n oak and redwood, moss and fern 

Like fragrant incense shed. 

Look down on great Yosemite, 

Its Winter beauty know — 
Its tumbling waters, icy vales, 

Its minarets of snow. 
Go view great Shasta, gaunt and white. 

Where glacial giants trod. 
In awe-inspiring majest 

The sentinel of I 

on the vastness Of the sea 

In foamy anger whirled 
\- mighty waves by tempest torn 

On jagged cliffs are hurled. 
Go read the book of Nature writ 

By Winter's mighty pen. 
The tragedies oi storm and si 



Bej "inl mere mortal ken. 
The beauty of the summer night, 

Tin- perfume of the spring. 
The charm of autumn's sombre hues. 

Their subtle pleasures bring. 
Rut Nature's most inspiring song 

Of mountain, vale or sea 
Is that with organ voice enshrined 

In Winter's symphony. 



POPULAR referendum^ at the No- 
vember election in a number of 
states indicate the forward march of 
highway construction. The results 
also have another significance for the 
road builder, according to Harvey M. 
Toy, Chairman of the California High- 
way Commission; they indicate the 
trend of highway financing. 

Reviewing the situation, the conclu- 
sion is that the tendency is unmistak- 
ably away from bond issues and to- 
ward direct taxation. A greater share 
of the cost of road construction is be- 
ing placed directly upon users of the 
highways. This is predicated upon the 
theory that the construction of modern, 
hard surfaced highways is reducing 
greatly the cost of operation of motor 
vehicles. The highway user is the great- 
est single benefactor of highway build- 
ing and. therefore, should make the 
greatest contribution to their construc- 
tion ami maintenance. 

One of the notable November vic- 
tories for good roads was the adoption 
of a constitutional amendment in Minne- 
sota authorizing the legislature to levy a 
tax on gasoline and specifically reserving 
the proceeds for construction of high- 
ways. Some 500,000 votes were cast in 
favor of the amendment and only 200,- 
000 against it. the Minnesota highway 

department reported. 

Missouri voters bj a large majority 
approved higher motor vehicle license 

fees and a gasoline tax. Voters in Texas 
also authorized the collection of a gaso- 
line tax. \ bond issue for highways was 

lefeated in Arizona, as was a >," 
issin- in Kentucky. Illinois approved a 
bond issue for state highways 
000,000, but this is to be paid, principal 
and interest, by motor vehicle license 
fees. The vote in its favor is reported 
almost four to one. 

There is a well defined movement in 
to adopt a gasoline tax similar to 
the Minnesota plan and the farm bureau 
organizations of Wisconsin are cam- 
paigning for a gasoline tax in that state 
where motor vehicle license fees are al- 
ready high. It was reported at the San 
Francisco convention that there is little 
doubt that Wisconsin will join the 
ranks of the gasoline tax states when 
its legislature meets. 

(Inly in Massaclir. - all. thick- 

ly settled state whose highway problems 
are not comparable with those of the 
Middle West, was a gasoline tax pro- 
l*>sal defeated. 



It will he noted that the out and out 
bond issue proposals, those of .Arizona 
and Kentucky, were defeated. The Illi- 
nois plan which places the entire burden 
on the 900,000 motor vehicle owners of 
that state was adopted. This plan is 
justified, Frank T. Sheets, Chief High- 
way Engineer of Illinois, told the San 
Francisco meeting, because the expendi- 
ture of $60,000,000 in highway construc- 
tion by Illinois already has greatly re- 
duced the cost of motor vehicle opera- 
tion and a still further reduction will 
result as the 9,000-mile projected system 
of hard surfaced roads is extended into 
all parts of the state. 

The question Toy asks regarding the 
Illinois plan is this : Why would it not 
be better to take the tax which the mo- 
torists of Illinois will pay for principal 
and interest on the bonds and carry for- 
ward a pay-as-you-go program ? It 
would seem that the sale of the bonds 
will not permit the work to go forward 
much faster than by the direct tax- 
method. Millions in interest would be 
saved as construction doubtless will be 
completed before the bonds are paid off. 
The tax would then be available for 
maintenance and construction. 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 

Wilson Bros. Co. 

Inrorpnrnti-tl 
1636-46 MARKET STREET 

lli-t. l-'mnklin ntnl *.«»ti^h 
IVh-pJiotM- 1'nrk -71 

n:i Sr4 \\r. San Mnt.-.» 



ifigBBfe 

TAILOR AND IMPORTER 
Latest Styles and Materials 

i'-rately Priced 
527 Post St., opp. Olympic Club 
San Francisco. Cal. 



18 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



3, 1925 



Bits of Unwritten History 



By Edward S. Spring 



(Author's Note- This is a collection of odds and ends— queer say- 
ines and dofngs in the local financial district and the mining helds.— 
(hit "me to the writer's attention during many years past and. so 
far as he knows, none of them have been hitherto published.) 

CHAPTER XVII 
Built From Bonanza Dividends 

IN the late 70s, John C. Morrison, of Moon, Scully & Co., 
a pioneer liquor firm, found his personal bank account 
growing so big, that something had to be done to relieve 
the congestion. He was a very large holder of the old 
bonanza stocks— Consolidated Virginia and California. 
Each of those stocks was paying regular monthly dividends 
of $2.00 per share. It looked as if these payments would 
be continued indefinitely. After much study as to how his 
rapidly increasing surplus should be safely invested, Mor- 
rison, who was the owner of a fair-sized lot at the north- 
west corner of Pine and Leidesdorff streets, decided to put 
up a fine building on that site. Fie had the bank make a 
separate account in his name, to which all the accumulated 
dividend money was transferred and the future dividends 
were to go. This he called his "Dividend Building Ac- 
count." Then he awarded the contracts for the building. 

The result of Morrison's decision, was the erection on 
the Pine and Leidesdorff corner of a fine building of five 
stories and a high basement. The architectural feature, 
was an iron front, in the Gothic style, facing Pine street. 
This was the first wholly iron front put up in San Francisco 
and gave the structure an imposing appearance. It was 
made at one of the big foundaries in the East and shipped 
here in sections, by rail. Morrison appropriately named 
his building the Dividend Building. 

While the Dividend Building was being constructed, the 
present writer frequently met Mr. Morrison and was shown 
the latter's special bank book, with the receipts from 
bonanza dividends entered on one side and the disburse- 
ments, all on account of the building, on the opposite page. 
When last seen, these disbursements had amounted to 
over $200,000 and they all were from the bonanza divid- 
ends. The completed building may have cost $225,000. 

A feature of the Dividend Building was the Dividend 
Saloon, in the rear, with the entrance on Leidesdorff street 
and said to have been the most beautifully adorned and 
equipped cafe-saloon ever constructed on the coast. Being 
in the wine and liquor business, Morrison knew just what 
to do in such a matter. His first intention was to name 
the saloon, the "Camille", in honor of the great Polish 
actress, Helena Modjeska, who made a furore here in that 
character at the time, and he was about to order a full 
length oil painting of her. as she appeared in the part, but 
he finallv chose the name "Dividend" as best in keeping 
with the building. The saloon was first rented and man- 
aged by Nick Steiner. 

The first floor above the high basement of the Dividend 
Building was occupied by the Crocker- Woolworth Bank. 
W. H. Crocker, the manager, had his office in a little back 
room. When the bank removed, this floor was taken by 
the San Francisco Clearing House Association. The high 
basement was occupied by S. B. Wakefield & Co., stock 
brokers, of which Arthur W. Foster. California University 
regent, was a member. The middle and upper floors were 
rented by law firms and corporations. Morrison intended 
to install a Hammam Bath place on the roof but abandoned 
that idea. 

The Dividend Building property, after Morrison's death, 
was bought by E. W. Hopkins. The building was de- 



stroyed by the great fire of 1906 and was replaced by the 
present handsome structure. It is to be regretted that 
Morrison's landmark, showing the great part that the 
Comstock lode has played in building up San Francisco, 
with its bullion and big dividends, should have disap- 
peared. 

Ghosts versus Goats 

The district bounded by California, Sansome, Bush and 
Montgomery streets used to furnish about everything in the 
line of speculation that an ardent gambler could wish, with 
its stock and grain exchanges, pool rooms, bucket shops, 
clock -games and little rooms back of saloons, where cards 
were played in all styles. Old Piatt's Hall, fronting on the 
east side of Montgomery street, between Pine and Bush, 
used to be an amusement center of the district. It was in the 
rear of that hall, that about fifty persons, including many 
"leading citizens", were arrested while watching and par- 
ticipating in the clock game and were carted off to the city 
prison in patrol wagons, amid the jeers of crowds in the 
streets. Ladies' walking matches, vaudeville performances, 
and political meetings also drew "packed houses" at the 
hall and one evening a memorable spiritual "seance" was 
given, with a full attendance. 

The medium who conducted this "seance" had gone 
through with his list of "manifestations" and had finished 
a story of his personal experiences with spirits, or ghosts, 
with this appeal to the audience : 

"And there are doubtless many among you here, tonight, 
who have also had close relations with spirits, or ghosts, 
of the departed. I would ask any such person in this hall 
to stand up." 

Only one man, a tall Irishman, in the rear of the hall, 
stood up in response to this request. He was asked by the 
medium to come forward to the platform. This the man 
did and on being assisted up the steps he was asked for his 
name. 

"Me name is James O'Riley." 

"Ladies and gentlemen," said the medium. "It gives me 
great pleasure to introduce to you Mr. James O'Riley, who 
will now tell you about the close relations he has had with 
the spirits, or ghosts." 

"(!h'ir-t<, did yez say?" said O'Riley. "Ghosts? I never 
had any relations with thim. I thought yez said Goats. 
I've had lots to do with thim." 

And that of course ended the wonderful Piatt's Hall 
"seance". 

( To be continued) 



KING AMBULANCE CO. 

Physicians' and Surgeons' Exchange 
Nurses' Registry 

2570 Bush Street, San Francisco 

Telephone West 1400 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS. CULVERTS. FLUMES. 

PENSTOCKS, GASHOLDERS, SMOKE STACKS, ETC. 

San Francisco, Calif. Lou Angeles, Calif. 

444 Market St. S717 Santa Fe Avenue 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel— 771 to 777 Valencia Street, Bet. 18th and 19th Sts., 
San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



fanuary 3. 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



19 



TvOwnMLCrier 




) WHO THE DEVILART THOU 

'ONE THAT WILL PLAY THE 
) DEl/IL,3lf) WITH YOU" 

— Sfiakspeare- 



IT strikes the writer of this depart- 
ment that drivers of automobiles 
should be arrested for other reasons 
than fast driving". They should be 
hauled in for that, too, especially when 
the occasion is in a crowded city, and 
their punishment is recommended as 
something sure to follow in a severe 
and striking manner. All this has 
been said before, we know, and deaths, 
which are akin to murder, pile up faster 
than ever. But what we have for fur- 
ther suggestion, and we think it pretty- 
hefty, is that these wild laddies bounc- 
ing along on the springs of chasses 
should be arrested on a few abiding- 
principles. If they are careless, wheth- 
er going a hundred miles an hour or 
not, they could be due for the iron 
grating. Take an instance like this, 
when an old lady or a child or I have to 
save ourselves by expert manipulation 
in crossing the public street, some sort 
of retribution should follow for that. 
Why wait until we are killed? If they 
take chances dodging around corners, 
thinking it all right as long as a pos- 
sible crash is not in view on the other 
side, a policeman should fire a club 
at the offenders. If the drivers croud 
you in any way, leaving it to you to 
avoid disaster, that is good enough of- 
fense. Passengers might be allowed 
to board street-cars with n<> thought 
of ten or eleven machines bearing di ivt n 
on him, and whoever wheels him or 
bumps him out of the way. should 
either be forthwith unceremoniously 
clapped into a cell, or the policeman 
should on the spot deputize six or seven 
healthy citizens to maul the negligent 
driver as they see fit. The franchise 
of driving a dangerous piece ol auto- 
matic manufacture through the streets 
of the city should lie gratefully con- 
sidered by the recipient, and if he even 
gets out of that state of mind, he should 
be shoved along to jail. In simple 
Words, the aged and the children want 
protection, ami so do I. 
* * * 
— Prohibition has come and has been 
with us for some years, and this ih ret- 
inas the city prison held more guests 
than ever. It lias been claimed that al- 
cohol is the Cause of insanity, which it i^ 

not. as is admitted by statisticians and 

doctors who believe in total abstinence. 
When one sees a man dead drunk and a 
sot, it is so easy to imagine for his kind 
all the crimes of the calendar, but in- 
dignation does not manufacture realities. 
It can be predicted that all of willing 
mind will soon recognize the small 
centage in the relationship between drink- 
ing ami crime, and that all men who 



drink are not beasts, ana what is more. 

all who get drunk, do not get dead drunk. 

and that most of those who make beasts 

of themselves, have done their misdeed 

in just that way, and are not bothering 

much about entering hallways to carry 

off the marble statuary. 
* * * 

— If California abolishes the poor 
houses, with an idea to be carried out that 
it will take care of the aged without cag- 
ing them, it will have done one of the 
finest things in modern civilization, for 
the Occident at least. China has a great 
reputation for venerating the older people. 
The scheme advocated by the Fraternal 
Order of Eagles, backed by the Daily 
News, and the writer, and similar to 
laws in force in Montana, Utah and 
Pennsylvania, is to use about 30 dollars 
a month for an indigent and infirm, for 
his living with his freedom. This is evi- 
dentally no more expensive than a poor 
house cost. If we are insured from going 
"over the hill." life will be made safe in 
peace. 

The San Francisco Bank 

(LATELY THK SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS 
AND LOAN SOCIETY) 

526 California St. (ami Branches), 
San Francisco 



For the quarter year ending December 31st. 

1924, a dividend lias been declared at the rate 
. > f lour anil one quarter H V, I per cent per 
annum on all deposits, payable <>n and after 

January 2nd, 1925. nividends not called Cor 

ar.> added In the deposit account ami 

interest from January 1st, 1925. Deposits 
made on or before January 10th, 1925, will 
earn interest from .January 1st. 1925. 

A. II, MIMd.EK. Secretary. 

l)l\ IDI'.M) NOTICE 

BANK OF ITALY 

iiemi Office and Ban Franctaco Branch** 

For the half year ending December 81, 1924, 

a dividend has ' a declared at the rat. ot 

four < i' per cent per annum on all Savings 
Deposits, payable on and after January -' 

1925. Dividends not 'ailed for are added to 
and I- me rate of Interest as th.' 
principal from January 1. 1926. SAVINGS 
DEPOSITS MADE ON THE FIRST BUSINESS 
DAT OF ANY MONTH (OR ON OR BEFORE 
THE TENTH DAT of JANUARY. APRIL., 
JULY AM. OCTOBER) WILL BARN INTER- 
EST FROM THE FIRST OF THAT MONTH: 
DEPOSITS MADE AFTER SAID DATE Wild. 
EARN INTEREST FROM THE FIRST OF 
THE FOLLOWING MONTH. 

JAMES v BACIGALUPI, President. 



General Auto Body Repairing 
nary Top General Trimminc 

Telephone Mnrkrl IS8E 

Tom Meek 

Auto Body Building 

Company 

Tin GOLDEN GATE \ \ l . \ I K 

Sun FrnnriiMMt. CaL 

Radiator and Fender Repairing 

Tllos f MEEK 




N. w CORNER 
FRANKLIN E 2960 POLK AND POST STS. 



CYCOL 

MOTOR OIL 



MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
the new HEXEON 
process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAX FR AXCISCO 



letch car ojberated 
bj/ reliable 

Chauffeurs 

a/Jro l/torou<fhlu under- 

t - f • 

stand the/r jbustttess 



This means that you 
can dispense with all 
worries as to personal 
security when usinp 
our cars. Our drivers 
are careful and they 
never violate your de- 
sires for safety. 





Phone Frjinktli. 217 
1620 Pine Street 
San FrtncUco 



^jED^ 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 3, 1925 



FINANCE 

(Continued from Page 10) 

— Another article that should be read is Campbell's, en- 
titled "Irrigation's Battle Won". If you want to know all 
that is doing in the irrigation field, either Stephens & Co. 
or Mason will tell you the truth. It is not, however, a 
thing to be happy about, that Eastern capital is being 
poured into our irrigation districts. We could do all the 
financing ourselves, but we have allowed irrigation's ene- 
mies to blind our eyes to the wonderful work that is being 
done, and have stood aloof. That blunders have been made 
does not excuse us. Do we spurn the child because it is 
born horizontal and cannot assume the perpendicular im- 
mediately? Flat folly! 

* * # 

— Did you see J. E. Stuart's oil painting on wood at The 
American Bank? A wonderful picturing of the sunset glow 
on Mt. Hood, looking up and across the Columbia River, 
with Rooster Rock in the middle distance. The effect is 
brought out to the maximum by the way the painting is 
set back in a retreating framework of black broadcloth and 
illuminated by indirect lighting. 

* * * 

— Again Heller, Bruce's Monthly Review of The Munici- 
pal Market is to hand. Time surely flies on no leaden 
wings, but I shall not complain as long as it continues to 
bring me the worthwhiles. Those interested in municipals 
will always find something worth reading when Heller gets 
to work with his stenographers. He is advising the pur- 
chase of Los Angeles bonds while prices are low ; good 
price advances being as certain as fogs in that part of San 
Francisco where the other fellow lives. They are under- 
priced just now because a big bunch of them were issued 
last year. The advice is sound. 

— Hunter, Dulin & Co. are sponsoring Sun Realty Co. 
First Mortgage Leasehold 20-year 6 l / 2 percent Sinking 
Fund Gold Bonds. The security is the leasehold interest 
in substantial real property, including a new eleven-story 
building to be erected, situated in one of the best locations 
in Los Angeles city. The interest and sinking fund of the 
bonds is amply secured by the rental to be received from 
Barker Bros., who have taken a 35 years lease. The risk 
of such an investment is infinitesimal, as will be appreciated 
by anyone who knows the history of Barker Bros. 

* * * 

— Dean Witter & Co. are going ahead. Guy Witter is 
in Los Angeles, opening a new branch, making the third 
recently opened on the Pacific Coast. The success of the 
firm is not difficult to understand. The executives know 
the business thoroughly and are very much alive. 

* * * 

— Arizona seems to be going wet, deaf to the pleadings of 
the drysj'the latest evidence being a request for a trifle over 
a million dollars for The Roosevelt Water Conservation Dis- 
trict, in the form of a bond issue sponsored by Stephens & Co., 
and Freeman, Smith & Camp Co. of San Francisco, other im- 
portant eastern houses participating. The yield is 6 per cent, 
prospects admirable. The bonds are going like hot cakes, I am 
told, but there is little fear of anyone burning their fingers. 
My_ congratulations to Campbell, the livest wire of the or- 
ganizing crowd. 

— So Edminson has done what we all knew he would do 
sooner or later — lined up Wm. R. Staats & Co. as associate 
members of the San Francisco Stock and Bond Exchange. 
Well, well, apples do not always ripen, do they, Mack? Get 
nipped in the bud. It is not yet too late to repent of the error 
of your ways. Not that the mining exchange has lost out alto- 
gether; it is forging ahead quite satisfactorily. The little rum- 
pus has done all good. 



— Did you see the list of listed securities advertised in The 
Examiner of Tuesday by the Stock and Bond Exchange? If 
anyone needs convincing as to the standing of San Francisco 
in the financial world, that should do the trick. All we now 
need is to pull together better. 

* * * 

—The "Wall Street Journal" and "Commerce and Finance," 
leading eastern papers, are going to publish the Stock and Bond 
Exchange quotations in future. It is never too late to mend ; 
they should have done it long ago. 

SOCIETY 

(Continued from Pagre 9) 

Miss Josephine Grant, the bride-elect's sister, will be maid of 
honor and there will be a large group of bridesmaids. 

* * * 

_ Another party of Saturday night for Marin County fam- 
ilies was given at the lovely home of Mr. and Mrs. E. N. 
Harmon, in Belvedere. The Harmon home, on the island 
hill, commands a panoramic view of the Alameda, San Fran- 
cisco and Marin County shore lines. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Watt Miller (Elizabeth Folger) had 
their second son christened Paul Albert at a ceremony last 
Saturday at St. Mary's Cathedral. Miss Elena Folger was 
the child's godmother and Albert Miller the godfather. The 
two sponsors are aunt and uncle to the baby, who is the 
grandchild of Mr. and Mrs. C. O. G. Miller and Mr. and 
Mrs. Ernest Folger. 

A reception of fifty or more guests followed the christen- 
ing at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Miller, every one drinking 
toasts to the little newcomer. 



William Adam McGee Jr. will claim Miss Edith Grant as 
his bride the second week in February. The ceremony 
promises to be one of the most important social events of 
the late winter, with hundreds of society folk from about 
the bay in attendance. Miss Josephine'Grant, the bride- 
elect's sister, will be maid of honor and there will be a large 
group of bridesmaids. 

Miss Grant's father, Joseph Grant, has given her a piece of 
property in Burlingame near his home, and plans are being 
prepared now to build on this, so that the young couple 
may take possession of a new home soon after their mar- 
riage. 

* * * 

In honor of Miss Hettie B. Ege, dean of residence and 
instructor in the mathematics department at Mills College, 
Dr. Aurelia Henry Reinhardt, president, entertained a large 
group of guests at a reception Sunday afternoon. 

Dean Ege will leave for the Atlantic Coast soon on a 
sabbatical leave of absence. She will visit Eastern colleges 
for women, and also visit many prominent members of the 
Mills alumni now in the East. 



Mr. and Mrs. Prentis Cobb Hale and Master Prentis 
Hale, Jr., left for New York on Saturday, to be away about 
six weeks. They are going to say goodby to Mrs. Hale's 
son, Commander Hamilton Bryan, U.S.N., who, with Mrs. 
Bryan, will sail for South America next month. Com- 
mander Bryan has been appointed to the naval commission 
at Rio Janeiro, with Admiral McCuIly in command. He will 
probably be on duty there for two or three years. 



SANITARY DRINKING WATER 

For Homes, Offices and Factories. Quality Guaranteed 

KEYSTONE WATER COMPANY 

130 Russ St. Phone Hemlock 170 San Francisco 



January 3, 1925 



AXL) CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



21 



Duco Enamel- 



on 



your 



car 



— will last three times as long 
as paint and varnish 

— is available in any color 

— can be applied in 10 working 
days for a first class job 

AMERICAN 
AUTO PAINTING CO., Inc. 

VAN NESS AVENUE AT EDDY STREET 
Authorized DUCO Refinishers 

WM. B. GIBSON, Manager 



Time 




Card 



THE DEPENDABLE: AUTOMOBILE FERRY Route offers 
motorists the shortest and most direct means of transporta- 
tion from Oakland, San Francisco, and all points south, to 
Vnllejo, Sacramento, Sonoma, Napa and Lake Counties and 
all points north. 



Leave Oakland 


111 


Leave 


Vallejo 


Side at 




U 


Side at 


"SHORT-WAY" 


> 


MORROW COVE 


A.M. 


P.M. 


DC 


A.M. 


P.M. 


teioo 


2:40 


111 


t5:45 


2:20 


6 130 


3:00 


ID 


6:15 


2i40 


7:00 


3:20 




6:45 


3:00 


7:30 


3:40 


111 


7:15 


3:20 


8:00 


4:00 


H 


7:45 


3:40 


8:20 


4:20 


3 


8:20 


4:00 


8:40 


4:40 


Z 


8:40 


4:20 


8:00 


S:00 




9:00 


4:40 


0:20 


5:20 


E 


9 120 


5:00 


9 140 


5:40 




9:40 


5:20 


10:00 


8:00 


X 


10:00 


5:40 


10:20 


6:20 




10:20 


6:00 


10:40 


6:40 


I 


10:40 


6:20 


11:00 


7:00 


1 


11:00 


6:40 


11:20 


7:20 


> 


11:20 


7:00 


11:40 


7:40 


< 


11:40 


7:20 


NOON 


8:00 


5 


NOON 


7:45 


12:00 


8:30 




12:00 


8:15 


P.M. 


9:00 


H 


P.M. 


8:45 


12:20 


9:30 


K 


12:20 


9:15 


12:40 


10:00 


O 


12:40 


9:45 


l:O0 


10:30 


I 


1:00 


10115 


1:20 


11:00 


co 


1:20 


10145 


1:40 


•11:30 




1:40 


•llilS 


2:00 


•12:00 


Ul 


2:00 


•11145 


2:20 


•12:30 


I 




•12:15 




•1:00 


r- 




•11:45 



'Saturdays. Sundays, Holidays — Extra Trips During: Heavy 
Traffic. tSundays and Holidays only. 

VM,\ J. HWniHl), Pres. and Gen. Mgr. 




DECORATIVE LIGHTING FITMENTS 

The standard of fine residential lighting 

PERFECLITES 

The standard of efficiency in commercial lighting 

PARCELLS-ARNEST 
COMPANY 

Authorized Dealers 



Complete Lines of Electric Lighting Fixtures 
for Immediate Installation 

55 New Montgomery Street Phone Garfield 4980 

SAN FRANCISCO 



You are invited to call at our show rooms in the Sharon 
Building (Exhibit of Building Materials) to inspect these 
fine fixtures. 



9 trains daily 

to LOS ANGELES 

at convenient hours 
VIA COAST LINE 



Lv. San Francisco (Third St. Station) Ar 


Los Angeles 


7:45 A.M. 


Daylight Limited 


7:45 P.M. 


8:00 A.M. 


Shore Line Limited 


10:45 P.M. 


6:15 P.M. 


Sunset Limited 


8:20 A.M. 


8:00 P.M. 


Lark 


9:25 A.M. 


4:50 P.M. 


Sunset Express 


8:10 A.M. 


VIA VALLEY LINE 






(Ferry Station) 




10:40 A.M. 


Los Angeles Express 


7:40 A.M. 


6:00 P.M. 


Owl 


8:50 A.M. 


7:40 P.M. 


Padre (runs via Coast Line) 


9:35 A.M. 


11:40 P.M. 


Los Angeles Passenger 
Similar Service Returning 


6:45 P.M. 




Daily Fares, $27.50 round trip 

Weekend Fares. $25.00 round trip 

Note the convenience of departure and 
arrival times. Consider also the luxurious 
comfort and safety of the service. 

And you'll lik-- Southern Pacific dining car service — hiKhest 

quality food dellclously prepared and served at 

vnur accustomed meal time, 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

65 Geary St 
Ferry Station 
Third E 
rhone Sutter 1000 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



[anuarv 3. 1925 




The loiter pi hew- 

(Swells 

^^hahonai crest 

(offee 

-the better it get! > 




GEO. W. CASWELL 



Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 



1,800,000 cups were Nerved at the Pan- 
ama Pacific International Exposition 



DUCO 

LACQUER 
Everluster Auto Enameling Co. 

BEAUTY AND DURABILITY 

Not affected by exposure. We guar- 
antee every one of our jobs. 

Phone Franklin 2775 
946 Bush Street San Francisco 



'Our new process does it/ 



ITEMS OF INTEREST 

It is said fogs may be dispelled by 
means of electric waves. 

A 714-pound alligator at the Cin- 
cinnati zoo is 125 years old. 

The enamel on teeth is the hard- 
est tissue in the human body. 

There are 5,500 noncommissioned 
officers in the American army. 

San Jose, Costa Rica, has the fifth 
finest opera house in the world. 

Windsor castle has been a royal resi- 
dence for more than 800 years. 

The first woman's rignts journal was 
established in Boston in 1854. 

The art of tinning iron appears to 
have originated in the sixteenth cen- 
tury. 

A Chinese typewriter would have to 
have about 2,000 keys on the board. 

Small tides are caused in the solid 
crust of the earth by the pull of the 
moon. 

A Japanese girl is not permitted to 
sit with a man in a moving picture 
house. 

A 30-cent American postage stamp 
of 1869 brought $1,750 when offered 
for sale. 

Of every thousand marriages cele- 
brated in London, 15 are between 
cousins. 

The admirality buildings, in White- 
hall, London, are two centuries old 
this year. 

In Ku, Central Africa, a couple must 

be engaged two years before marriage. 

Women get old among primitive 

people much earlier than in higher civ- 

ilizati* ins. 

The average cost of keeping one 
rat in the United States is about 25 
cents a year. 

It is said Egyptian ^i r 1 s are very 
pretty at 14. but immediately after be- 
gin to fade. 

China, with a population of 340.- 
000.000, has a military man power of 
15,000,(0). 

A nonbreakable watch "crystal" 
can be made from a piece of trans- 
parent celluloid. 

To please the South Sea islander 
a girl must lie tattooed sky blue and 
wear a nose ring. 

< Inly in the last 15 years or so has 
it been possible to bore holes through 
diamonds. 

Policemen in Sweden receive small 
decorations for their knowledge of for- 
eign languages. 

In Sicily, a young woman is usually 
\vc«l at 15, that being the legal age for 
marriage. 

Brewton. Ga., has a woman mayor 
and five women members of the board 
of aldermen. 

Charcoal can be made from any kind 
of wood, but the quality varies with 
the wood used. 



In the whole of England there are 
only a dozen women who are quali- 
fied to practice law. 



Tel. Garfield 6455 



H.& S. 

GARAGE 



639 Turk Street 
San Francisco, Calif. 



°g 



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mobile owners. For a small monthly 
payment they take all your automo- 
bile worries away from you. Your car 
is kept in first-class mechanical condi- 
tion. It's greased and oiled. It's towed 
in San Francisco free of charge. Re- 
placement of parts up to $50 free, in 
case of damage by collision. 10 per 
cent discount on oils and greases and 
gasoline. Automobiles washed for 
$1.50. And other features. 

Investigate, or phone for 
representative 



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Established 1S55 
41 First Street, San Francisco 




Mail Advertising 
Specialists 

ACCURATE AND PROMPT 
SERVICE 

Andrews-Breeding Company 

Sutter 6224 

Room 801 Gillette Building 

830 MARKET STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 




yP EPORTS from all parts of the 
X I country indicate that the new 
I De Luxe Sedans are enjoying 
Vo the most enthusiastic reception 
any Chandler has ever received 
during its twelve years of success- 
ful achievement. 



Today's 

AN 



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any motorist could desire. 

CHANDLER-CLEVELAND MOTOR CAR CO. 






Van New at Sacramento — Prospect 6700 
Hebrank-HunUr & Peacock Co., 3020 Broadway, Oakland 



OPEN SUNDAYS 



ESTABLISHED J"LY 20, 1856 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



California Advertiser 



$5.00 PER YEAR 




zAt Loenv s Warjield 

next week: 
Sleanor "Boar dm an, 

In 
i SoThis is Marriage, 

in a wonderful gown 
designed especially for 

her part. 



STATEMENT 

Of the Condition and Value of the Assets and Liabilities 

of 

The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society 

HIBERNIA BANK 

Dated San Francisco, December 31, 1924 



ASSETS 



1 — Bonds of the United States ($11,000,000.00). of the State of California and the Counties, 
Cities and School Districts thereof ($19,762,833.87), of the State of New York 
($894,000.00), of the City of New York ($1,139,000.00), of the State of Nevada 
($100,000.00), of the State of Oregon ($51,000.00). of the County of Lane. Or. 
($200,000.00), of the County of Douglas, Or. ($147,000.00), of the County of 
Bergen, N. I. ($120,000 00), 'of the County of Jackson, Or. ($S4,000.00), of the 
County of Clackamas, Or. ($73,950 00 1, of the City of Cleveland, Ohio ($105,- 
000.00), of the City of St. Paul. Minn. ($100,000.00), of the City of Jersey City, 
N. T- ($50,000 00), of the City of Portland, Or. ($50,000.00). of the City of Day- 
ton] Ohio ($25,000.00), the actual value of which i- $33,819,202.82 

2 — Miscellaneous Bonds comprising Quasi-Public Corporation Bands and Real Estate 

Mortgage Bonds (£3,084,000.00). the actual value of which is 3,025,263.00 

3— Cash on Hand 2,978,520.89 

4 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, the actual value of which is 39,819,002.30 

Said Promissory Notes are all existing Contracts, owned by said Corporation, 
and the payment thereof is secured by First Mortgages on Real Estate within 
this State, and the States of Oregon, Nevada, Washington and Utah. 

5 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, the actual value of which is 469,050.00 

Said Promissory Notes are all existing Contracts, owned by said Corporation, 
and the payment thereof is secured by pledge of Bonds and other securities. 

6 — (a) Real Estate situate in the City and County of San Francisco ($196,882.87), and 
in the Counties of Monterey ($63,875.32), and San Luis Obispo ($92,264.36). in 

this State, the actual value of which is 353,022.55 

(b) The Lands and Buildings in which said Corporation keeps its offices, the actual 

value of which is 1,139,639.69 

TOTAL ASSETS $81,603,701.25 



LIABILITIES 

1 — Said Corporation owes Deposits amounting to and the actual value of which is $75,681,008.10 

2 — Reserve Fund _ $5,922,693.15 

TOTAL LIABILITIES $81,603,701.25 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

By E. J. Tobin, President. 
THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
By J. O. Tobin, Acting Secretary. 
STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 
City and County of San Francisco — ss. 

E. J. TOBIN and f. O. TOBIN. being each duly sworn, each for himself says: That said E. |. 
TOBIN is President and that said J. O. TOBIN is A. ting Secretary of THE HIBERNIA SAYINGS 
AND LOAN SOCIETY, the Corporation above mentioned, and that the foregoing statement is true. 

E. J. TOBIN, President. 
J. O. TOBIN, Acting Secretary. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 2nd day of January, 1925. 

CHAS. T. STANLEY, 

Notary Public in and for the City and County of 

San Francisco, State of California 




EfUMIahid July SO, IOM 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

Tin- San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott. 

Jr.. from 1SS4 to 1925. Is now printed and published by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 235 Montgomery St., San Francisco, California. Telephone 

Douglas 6S53. Entered at San Francisco, California, Post Office as second-class matter. London Office: Stieet & Co.. 30 Cornhill, E. C. London, 

England. Subscription Plates (including postage), one year, $5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 



Vol. CYI 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JANUARY 10, 1925 



No. 2 



— The greatest achievement for the human being is to be 
useful. 

— Petting parties are on the increase, and yet hurry-up mar- 
riages are on the decline, which forms a sort of anomaly in our 
minds that we can't puzzle out. 



— "Look at those dogs playing," said Epictetus, "fawning 
on one another in good friendship. Toss a bone to them and 
you will see them bite and destroy one another." So with 
men, self-interest is the bone that drives them to discord. 



— The more we associate with poets, the more is the fact 
impressed upon us that there should be national asylums, 
havens or sanctuaries for these children of nature, where they 
could be supported and cherished. The cold business world is 
no place for them. 

* * * 

— Cross-word puzzles arc so much the rage now, that they 
are engrossing the attention of even the tired business man, 
and it is a common sight to behold Captains of Industry, and 
Lieutenants, too, on the Peninsula trains making furrows in 
their foreheads over some new word. 



There are two undertakers in the new Assembly. At an 
earlier stage of Calif ornian political history that might have 
had a utilitarian bearing, but now we have grown so pious that 
we do not even brawl as in the respectable Senate at Washing- 
ton. Thus does fate always jeer at us and provide, as the 
Scotch say, beef when the teeth are gone. 



Tendency of our local people to become international is evi- 
dent in the case of Alma Reed. Formerly a newspaper woman, 
she took an interest in archaeology and went to the old Mexican 
cities in Yucatan and elsewhere, where excavations are carried 
on. Now she has attained enough distinction to be invited to 
take part in the exploration of the buried cities of North 
Africa. So a new career opens for women in archaeology! 



— The Bishop of Gloucester gives a warning to England: 
"The British Empire has been create 1 and peopled because this 
island sent out a vigorous and capable stock tor commerce, for 
Imperial rule, and for colonization throughout the world. If 
that stock fails, the Empire will fail, and we will have to give 
way to others who are willing to increase and inultifv, and to 
work with their bands, replenishing the earth." We should 
take some of- this wisdom to ourselves, in the matter of the 
tilling of the soil in our beloved State, which is being done 
more and more by what Kipling called "the lesser breeds." 



— Montgomery Street is not only narrow, but it is generally 
rather free from cops, and congested traffic during the rush 
hours is becoming more and more difficult to handle. We 
would suggest that this street should allow no parking between 
Market and Sacramento, on either side, between the hours of 
4:30 and 6:00 p. m. 

* * * 

— San Francisco has an enviable reputation for fairness and 
no small clique of newspaper writers should be suffered to 
cause her to lose it. In regard to the recent victory of Notre 
Dame over Stanford at Pasadena, some sporting scribes here 
have sought to discount the achievement of the boys from the 
east by employing "if s" and "ands" and "supposings" and "it 
might have beens" in discussing the contest. The Indiana lads 
won the game and the Crimson boys won our admiration by 
their sportmanship and effort and no doubt the latter, indi- 
vidually and as a team, will concede they were outclassed. 
Let's conserve our reputation for fairness. 



— Public Opinion, published in London, and a most enlight- 
ening and instructive publication, has an article in its issue 
of December 19th, PA24, giving Marconi's recent inaugural 
address at the 171st session of the Royal Society of Arts, which 
should interest every radio fan in the country. Mr. Marconi 
took up the theory of electric waves bending around the earth. 
ins'ead of shooting off into space, constituting electrically a 
kind of curved ceiling, at a certain distance above the earth, 
ca|iable of reflecting electric waves, and resulting in these find- 
ing themselves between two concentric surface-, from which 
they cannot escape. He has been investigating the effect of 
daylight on these charged waves, for it has been proved that 
waves of a certain length will cover great distances by daylight, 
whilst others will only cover similar ranges at night time. Buy 
this number of Public Opinion, Mr. Radioman, and learn a 
lot about this wonderful invention. 



— There are many phases in the Child Labor Amendment 
that are commendable, and should be put through, but one's 
enthusiasm is rather squelched when we read what Mme. Le- 
lina, wife of the President of the Communist International, 
has to say anent this bill : 

"We must nationalize the children. We must remove the 
chil Iren from the pernicious influence of the family. We must 
register the children, or — let us speak plainly — we must 
nationalize them. Thus they will from the very start remain 
under the beneficial influence of communist kindergartens and 
schools. Here they will grow up to be real communists. To 
compel the mother to surrender her child to us, to the soviet 
State, that is the practical task before us." Did you ever read 
anvthing more Germanic and arbitrary in your life? Why not 
dress all children in a uniform, also, and number them, as we 
do convicts? This amendment is a communistic measure, and 
communism has no place in a democracy. Let us leave that 
for — Russia. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 10, 1925 




then that it will become public property, as is the way with in- 
ventions. 



The outside world was inclined to 
Our Magnificent Record look upon California with a certain 

amount of sympathy last year and 
to think that we were having an exceptionally hard time. The 
Eastern papers wasted good ink and paper in their expressions 
of condolence and cheered us constantly with ironic reference 
to the fact that the god of rain was a trifle deaf to us and that 
the murrain on the cattle would seem to place us in an unenvia- 
able category. He laughs best who laughs last however, and, 
as far as San Francisco is concerned, so far from last year 
being one of depression and gloom, it was on the other hand 
one of marked success and prosperity. Whether we take bank 
clearings or building operations or exports and imports or the 
development of local industry, the tale is the same. An index is 
to be found in the post office receipts, which show nearly 
more than seven and a half million of dollars in excess of 1923. 
The bank clearings were in rough figures 317 million dollars 
more than in 1923, and there were $7,400,000 bank clearings in 
December of last year over the December of 1923. There was 
a slight falling off in the realtv market and the high figures 
of 1923,— $156,188,438, were no't reached as the totality of the 
sales of real estate amounted to $140,000,000. But the fact 
that there was a presidential election last year and that political 
campaigns inariably interfere with the real estate business, has 
to be taken into consideration and under the circumstances, the 
experts argue that the conditions in the realty market show no 
falling off. On the whole, it was a banner year in all respects 
and San Francisco maintains its place at the head of coast 
business. Her sovereignty as a coast capital has not been even 
attacked, and, with the prospects which are so excellent for the 
coining year, we shall see the whole of Northern California 
acquiring that importance and a degree of recognition which 
we have always known to be certain. 



The California Legislature met 
The California Legislature for the beginning of its forty- 

sixlh session at the State Cap- 
itol on Monday last. The session, as far as can be seen at 
present, is likely to be useful and unexciting. Most useful 
sessions are not exciting and we can spare the fireworks if 
we get the business done. There is some talk about "pro- 
administration" and "anti-administration" forces ; but there 
is likely to be little acrimony about that. The appropriations 
cause the trouble, for every local patriot is out for his own, not- 
withstanding the claims of others. But this is to be expected, 
and not to be rashly condemned, as the sum total of local zeals 
for progress means the zeal for the general prograss of the 
State as a result. What we call for most is an honest Legisla- 
ture and it must be gladly admitted that our legislators are for 
the most part honest today, and that the gathering at Sacra- 
mento for legislative purposes is to a great extent a gathering 
of earnest men who are determined to do their best for the 
State as a whole. It would be hard to ask more than that. 
That there will be some severe contests over such matters as 
the Child Labor Amendment to the United States Constitution 
is to be expected. It is a controversial matter of the greatest 
importance and may be expected to produce differences of 
opinion. It would be unfortunate if it did not. The usual 
jibes of the daily press will endeavor to make the members 
as ridiculous as possible and to give the impression that the 
legislature is a sort of Wild West show with a monkey-house 
annex. That is the tradition of California daily papers and 
they do not seem to be able to get away from it. Why it should 
be so is quite hard to explain. Why we should go to the ex- 
pense and labor of electing a legislature only to deride it, passes 
understanding. For our part we regard the State Legislature 
as a dignified and important body worthy of the sympathetic 
interest of all citizens. 



It will be noted that for many 
A New Airplane Engine months after the war was over 

the British made practically no 
progress in aviation. It is true that various line-; of travel were 
instituted and that air-travel between Britain and the continent 
was developed to the extent that air journeys to the principal 
European capitals became a common-place of ordinary life. 
But the army planes were left in the condition that the war had 
produced and there was apparent quiescence to such an extent 
that critics arose to say that the life of of ihe country was in 
danger. The French had greatly increase 1 the number of their 
planes and after the war still went on increasing. They had an 
available fifty-four squadrons of airplanes against a British 
eighteen of inferior construction. The world saw in the 
quietude with which the Poincare occupation of the Ruhr was 
accepted by the British government, a proof that the British 
were overawed by the French planes and the downfall of 
Britain at the hands of conquering air forces was loudly 
prophesied. Now. the British are saying that the supremacy 
of the air is to be theirs as was the former supremacy of the 
seas. The air squadrons are increasing rapidly. New mam- 
moth planes are being constructed of steel, capable of carrying 
large numbers of troops and of flying to India. They have in- 
creased the speed of scout planes by twenty miles an hour and 
have reduced the weight of engines considerably. In other 
words, they seem to have done the same trick in the air that 
they formerly did on the sea and in making a new air-dread- 
naught, as it were, to have practically scrapped the aerial navies 
of their rivals at one sweoo. There is little doubt that the 
secret of the new engine will be carefully kept for a while and 



When the proposition to increase the 
The Postal Increase wages of postal employees was pre- 
sented to the President, he took just the 
view of the situation that one might have expected from his 
disposition and executive practice. As we all know by this 
time, the President has a feeling, amounting almost to a pas- 
sion, against any form of extravagance cither in public or pri- 
vate life, lie has also a conviction, for which we should all 
be grateful, that taxes are too high now and that an era of 
governmental economy is the best and easiest way in which to 
reduce them. In that respect it cannot be questioned that the 
President strikes a responsive chord in the entire industrial and 
commercial community. This being his attitude, he declined to 
consider the raise in pay unless there was a corresponding in- 
crease in income in the postal service. The bill, of which Senator 
Moses of New Hampshire has charge, is supposed to produce 
the $68,000,000 which the new wage scale will necessitate. It is 
a compromise measure and does not raise the rates on second- 
class matter to the same extent as was proposed by Postmaster 
General New, of which rate the President had formerly ap- 
proved. Against these high rates the newspaper publishers 
have protested with success and the new bill is an arrangement 
by which it is expected that the deficit can be made up and the 
increased pay allowed without working too great a hardship 
on the publishing industry. But the bill, even so, will not have 
a walk over, as the notice of Senator Norris of Nebraska that 
he will block immediate consideration would seem to show that 
the course is by no means clear and that there are interests 
still dissatisfied. It may be generally conceded that the wages 
of postal employees should be raised, as far as can be done with 
due consideration of the in'erests of the community at large. 
The postal personnel is on the whole a very fine bo ly of men 
and the way in which they have carried their holiday burden is 
deserving of praise. 



January 10, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



How many of us saw the sun 
Sunrise at the New Year rise on New Year's morning in 

San Francisco? Qui'.e a num- 
ber were up, no doubt, and getting back from the very tem- 
perate celebrations with which the new year was welcomed, 
but of these very few had either the time or the inclination to 
watch sunrises. The mere pursuit of beauty, as beauty, is 
something to which we have not yet at ained. A common 
Chinese peasant or a Sicilian could perhaps give us main 
lessons in the appreciation of color for the sake of color, 01 
of beauty for the sake of beauty. And yet there was a handful 
of people determined to see the rising of the sun, with a 3 oru of 
mystical love of beauty, much as the mystically religious accend 
hills to see the sunrise on Easter morning. And they were 
well rewarded. Incidentally, the lovers of the abstract are 
always well rewarded, for they receive in reality the promise 
"all other things shall be added unto you." Never did the sun 
rise more fairly over our bay than on the morning of this year. 
The bay grew light with the most entrancing swiftness. Alca- 
traz peeped out of the mist to soon become a dazzling jewel in 
the morning light ; the mists rolled away from Tamalpais and 
the beautiful, graceful mountain stood up, the mists dropping 
like garments from a Greed goddess. The Gate, which had 
been lost in the dark, actually leaped as it were from the ocean, 
and, changing through various shades of blue ended in a glitter 
and sparkle as the sun touched the rocks. Speaking as one who 
haunts sunrises and sunsets and to whom the changing colors 
on the bay are unsurpassingly alluring, it may be said that the 
sunrise on the morning of the New Year was exceptionally 
lovely; beautiful beyond words from the top of Telegraph Hill. 
But ever since we have been haunted by the thought that the 
sight of it from the hill there by Montara must have been ex- 
quisite beyond measure. 



It seems late in the day to refer to the 
Smoking Women now almost universal custom of smoking 

by women. It would be crass and crude 
to raise any question as to its relative virtue or lack of it. Dis- 
cussion of the matter from the point of view of the exclusive 
male prerogative to consume tobacco, could only be taken in 
hand humorously, as no one with any inelligence woul 1 insist 
any longer upon that side of the question. Cut a very famous 
Vienna doctor, one Hofstaetter, has put the affair in another 
light and has said that smoking women are unhappy. I [e has 
written a whole book about them and chief among his state- 
ments is the foregoing. Now. of course, if smoking is an 
outward and visible sign of an inward and spiritual female un- 
happiness and comes to be recognized as such, its effects upon 
smoking women will be quite incalculable. No woman will ad- 
vertise her unhappiness by smoking and the public use of the 
weed by ladies will decline even more rapidly than it became 
fashionable. Perhaps the doctor has this in view and thus 
makes war upon a practise which he dislikes and against which 
his book is obviously directed. Tims, he declares that smoking 
tends to make women look masculine; he also maintains that 
it is used solely for the purpose of showing of graceful an 1 
playful movements in public. He had better S ick to his guns 
that women smoke because they are unhappy, for there he is 
on ground that he can maintain. He might also extend the 
argument and say that men smoke for the same teas, n. We 
have the best philosophical and sacred groun Is for the con- 
tention that happiness is not to be expected; that where it oc- 
curs, it occurs accidentally. Thus, to say that smoking women 
are unhappy is perhaps no more than to say that women being 
human beings are unhappy and that some of the unhappy ones 
smoke. This also would apply to men and the distinction made 
by the learned doctor like most such distinctions disappears in 
the light of reason. 



It is seldom an astute business 
Business Versus Prejudice man allows prejudice to inter- 
fere with his commercial trans- 
actions. He buys where and from whom it seems profitable. 
The Market Street Railway properties are up for sale to the 
City and County of San Francisco — a corporation; but the 
stockholders thereof — the voting public — has several times 
turned down the offer and seemingly through prejudice. 
Memories of Pat Calhoun, strikes, bloodshed, Ruef and 
Schmi z and their granted franchises still linger despite the 
fact these things have naught to do with the present company ! 
In a word, prejudice, to a great extent has been the motive 
actuating the refusal of a two-thirds majority of San Fran- 
cisco voters to buy into a good business and a profitable one! 
Rather like a case of cutting off the nose to spite the face. Our 
effort is to place before the electorate a proposition in the light 
of a good investment and to endeavor to dispel the fog of silly 
enmity still obtaining to prevent a useful enterprise : the bring- 
ing of the assorted city railways into one interchangeable 
municipally-owned system. 



Lectures in Astronomy 
The first of a series of fifteen lectures on "The Elements 
of Astronomy" will be given by Mr. Carlos S. Mundt, 
M. A., at the Engineers' Club, 57 Post street, on Monday- 
evening, January 12, at 7:30 o'clock. The series will be under 
the auspices of the Extension Division of the University of 
California, with the cooperation of the Astronomical Society 
of the Pacific. The lectures are designed to give in non- 
technical terms to those attending, a good basic knowledge of 
the principles of Astronomy. The topics will be the Solar 
System. Earth, Time, Calendar, Moon, Eclipses. Planets. 
Asteroids, Comets. Meteors, Stars. Clusters. Nebulae and 
Problem of Stellar Evolution. 



A Scotsman took a sixpenny ticket in a raffle for a pony 
and trap, which he was lucky enough to win. All his friends 
thought he would be overjoyed with his good fortune, but 
when the pony and trap were brought to him, all he did 
was to walk around surveying them with a gloomy face. 
At last he turned to one of his friends and said, "I told ye 
the whole thing was a swindle." "Why, what's the mat- 
ter?" asked the other. "Well," demanded; the Scotsman, 
"where's the whip?" 



John, the hale and hearty steward of the cross-Channel 
boat was at his usual stand at the gangway, retailing his 
constant instructions: "First-class passengers to the right, 
second-class to the left." 

Along came a young woman holding a baby in her arms. 
She seemed undecided which way to proceed. 

"First or second?" asked John, kindly. 

The girl's face was suffused with blushes as she stam- 
mered: "Oh. dear; oh, it's — it's not mine." 
» * * 

It was with considerable astonishment that the manager 
of a Minneapolis shoe store watched his new clerk, a tall 
Swede, deliberately throw a new pair of shoes into the 
wastehasket. 

"What's the matter with those shoes?" asked the man- 
ager. 

"Dey ain't any good." replied the clerk. 

"1 low do y, u know ?" 

"I ban try 'em on half dozen fallers and dey vouldn't 

fit none of dcm." 

* * » 

"Was the hotel manager indignant when you asked him 
for another week's credit?" inquired the friend of the Havana 
tourist who had found his luck not so good. 

"Not at all." was the response. "It was I who was put 
out." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 10, 1925 




>LE/1SURE'SW4ND 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURES 

_ lorn Hoore- 




By Katherine Schwartz 
Formerly of the "Chicago Tribune" 



New Columbia 

FOLLOWING Mitzi into the New Columbia will be seen a 
new and richly staged version of the thrilling- Alexander 
Dumas romance. "The Three Musketeers," with Fritz Leiber, 
an old favorite of San Francisco, and his company who are 
booked at this house for a two weeks' engagement. 

In addition to the "Three Musketeers" this company will also 
present "Hamlet." "Macbeth," "The Taming of the Shrew." 
"Julius Caesar," "Othello," "Romeo and Juliet." and "The 
Merchant of Venice." 



Imperial 

With crowds lining up as early as seven o'clock in the morn- 
ing to see Eric Von Stroheim's "Greed," it is needless to say- 
that this is a most unusual offering in the way of a picture. 

It is of great interest to playgoers in this city, for in addition 
to having been made here — that is, the greater part of it — the 
novel from which it was adapted was written by a native of this 
city, Frank Norris. 

The novel's title, "McTeague." was changed to "Greed," be- 
cause it seemed to tell the story better in this one word. Norris 
was a realist in every sense of the word, and "Greed" is not a 
pretty story, but it iias a moral, is intensely dramatic, and 
reacts upon an audience in marked manner. 

There is a strong cast in this picture, which includes Zazu 
Pitts, Gibson Gowland. Jean Hersholt, Dale Fuller, Fanny 
Midgly, Chester Conklin, Sylvain Ashton, Hughie Mack and 
Frank Hayes. 

St. Olaf's Choir 

Words seem utterly futile, when one tries to tell something 
of what they experienced upon hearing the St. Olaf Choir, at 
the Auditorium this week. 

This choir, which numbers about sixty voices, is a marvel in 
the quality of its tone, its precision, its purity of intonation, its 
command of nuances, and its responsiveness to the conductor, 
F. Melius Christiansen. 

These young descendants of the Vikings carry pitch in their 
heads, so that it is quite unnecessary to use an instrument to 
establish the key. 

To attempt to express something of the feeling which their 
music conjured up, sent forth in a living stream, is to wish for 
adjectives as fresh and as fraught with meaning as the ex- 
quisite voices of these young singers. 

Mr. Christiansen deserves the gratitude of the whole nation, 
for we will never hear such a celestial choir as that of the 
hallelujahs and hosannas of St. Olaf's Lutheran Choir. 



Casino 

This week the picture — Mrs. Wallace Reid's "Broken Laws" 
holds the first position at Beatty's Casino. It's a terrific drama 
of the jazz age, and gives much food for thought. 

The vaudeville bill includes six big acts, headed by Nep 
Scoville & Co. in "Pinched," Clayton Kirby and Evalyn 
De Gage in a spectacular revue with Lopez's Castilian Sere- 
nades. 

The Casino seems to have "caught on" with San Franciscans, 
who show their appreciation by their large attendance at all 
performances. 

Next week the screen offering will be "Christine of the 



Hungry Heart." featuring Florence Vidor. This story is from 
the pen of Kathleen Norris. 

There will also be six excellent vaudeville acts. 



Strand 

Will King and his company offer this week a piece called 
"Dumb Dora," — I couldn't quite understand why it was so 
named, — but it has some very clever numbers, some beautiful 
gowns, and as always, splendid stage settings. 

There are several groups of songs, — the best of which was 
the group "Cake Walking," "Strut Miss Lizzie," "Step 
Henrietta," "Walk Jenny," and the "Strutters' Ball," with 
Millie l'e Iro. Evelyn Marion. Marion Blossom, Ethel Burney, 
and a newcomer in the company — a clever colored lad, Strut 
Marshall, who quite stopped the show in this number as well as 
in his appearance with the orchestra. 

Next week, this company will present "Friend Wife," in 
which Will King and his partner, Lew Duubar, will be able to 
delight their audiences. This is described as a funny, frisky- 
frolic. 



Warfield 

"So This Is Marriage." an ultra-modern photoplay featuring 
Eleanor Boardman, Conrad Nagel and Lew Cody, is the 
newest story booked for Loew's Warfield. This one heads the 
program, beginning next Saturday which will also include a 
gorgeous stage revue, "Bagdad." staged by Fanchon and 
Marco. 

The story deals with a young married couple and their 
troubles during the first five years. Eleanor Boardman is the 
beautiful wife. Conrad Nagel the husban 1. while Lew Cody is 
the bachelor friend. 

A novel touch has been added to this production by the 
Biblical story of David and Bath-Sheba. This insertion is in 
beautiful natural colors. Hundreds of people are used in big 
scenes which include a mammoth festival with a big ballet of 
( Iriental dancers staged by Fanchon and Marco, our own San 
Francisco producers. 

Mr. Marco is now in the East and during his absence Miss 
Fanchon will come up from Hollywood to stage "Bagdad," 
next week's revue, which will have an ( Jrienal flavor similar to 
the dance sequence in the techni-color scenes of the film. 

A concert by Severi and the music masters and short comic 
and topical reels will conclude the bill. 



Curran 

Parents' self-sacrifice is the leading theme of "The Goose 
Hangs High." Louis O. Macloon's sparkling comedy which 
opened at the Curran this week. 

There is a splendid cast, headed by Cyril Keigbtly, who will 
he remembered for his work in "Spring Cleaning" several 
months ago. Effie Ellsler is another capable actor in this fine 
company, in which every individual seems well fitted for his 
role. 

The debut of another one of San Francisco's own — Harry- 
Crocker — was also a matter of much interest. He has made 
good in every sense of the word. He is young, good looking, 
wi'.h a good stage personality, and has a good part in this play. 
The opening night there was a big demonstration for him, but 
he modestly kept in the background, while the audience 



January 10, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



applauded and applauded. He has gone 
a long way since his appearance at the 
Players Club in "Aria da Capo." 

This is a fine comedy, and once more 
Mr. Macloon has demonstrated his ability 
lo stage plays. 



Orpheum 

For the last few weeks the Orpheum 
Theatre has been presenting new pro- 
grams each Sunday, and the coming week 
several international stars will be seen. 

Nelson Keyes, comedian, assisted by 
.Miss Irene Russell, both stars of Char- 
lot's Revue, will offer some characteristic 
impressions. 

Max Fisher, ever-popular leader, and 
his orchestra will be seen with his new 
orchestra. 

Tillie Solar, another international 
favorite, is also on the bill in a riot of 
comedy entitled "The Laugh Factory." 
The Water Queen, Odiva with her school 
of Pacific Sea Lions, will give an exhibi- 
tion of fancy diving in an immense glass 
tank. 

Karasaeff, a great Russian dancer, is 
also on this bill assisted by a large com- 
pany. 

Frank Hurst and Eddie Vogt, in 
"Profiteering in Fun"; The Connor 
Twins ; and "Juggleland'' with Fred and 
Anna Henning, will complete this most 
promising vaudeville bill. 



Golden Gate 

Next week at the Golden Gate the 
headliner is an eccentric dancer, tumbler 
and singer, Clyde Cook. With the aid 
of two assistants he executes some ex- 
tremely difficult falls in his act. 

A second feature on the new bill is 
Howard Kyle, eminent dramatic star who 
will be seen in a skit written especially 
for him. In his support will be seen Amy 
Hodges, Buckley Starkey, Cliff Worman 
and Marjorie Hayes. 

Al and Fanny Steadman, popular 
Orpheum stars, will be seen in their nut 
comedy stuff, "Pianocapers." There is 
also a juggling and acrobatic act. the 
Kikutas Japs, billed as the "Oriental 
Wonder \\ inkers." 

Fddie Weber and Marion Ridnor sing, 
dance and chatter in their number en- 
titled "Just a Couple of Nifties." The 
Australian Whip King, Burt Shepar 1, 
'will give an exhibition of his skill with a 
whip. 

On the screen will be seen Cullen 
Landis and Lillian Rich in "Cheap 
Kisses." Claude Sweden's orchestra will 
play. 

The New Wilkes 

January twelfth will mark the opening 
nt' the New Wilkes Theatre — formerly 
the Columbia — then for two weeks the 
Geary Street Theatre. 

This opening will have a doubly sig- 
nificant meaning for the opening ar Tac- 
tion will be those ever-popular come- 
dians. Kolb and Dill. 



The playhouse has been all refurnished 
and renewed for this event, and reports 
which have come to us from the North- 
west, where this famous pair have been 
appearing for nearly two months, indi- 
cate that in their new vehicle they have 
one of the most entertaining offerings of 
their career. 

It sure will seem good to see Kolb and 
Dill in something where they will sing 
and dance a bit as in the good, old days. 
Their new piece is called "Politics" and 
was written for them by the lata Aaron 
Hoffman. It is said to give them a splen- 
did opportunity to burlesque some of the 
latest political sensations which have 
swept the country. 

They have surrounded themselves with 
a splendid company, a bevy of pretty 
girls, and in addition Ernest Ball, enter- 
tainer and composer, will be seen, assisted 
by the girls, in a specialty number. 

Those who remember "The High Cost 
of Loving" which broke all records when 
seen here, will be glad to know, that in 
this year's offering they even surpass 
that stellar attraction. 



Capitol 

"White Collars," the great play of the 
middle class, is going into its fourth week 
at the Capitol, and ju lging from all indi- 
cations it is due to stay here for an 
indefinite period. 

There is a splendid cast and some fine 
comedy, with just the right amount of 
pathos, and it provides a fine evening's 

entertainment. . 

Alcazar 

"Just Marrie 1," a comedy of irresist- 
ible appeal for every member of the 
household, will be the Alcazar attraction 
beginning with the performance next 
Sunday night. It will be the Si 
vehicle of the Henry Duffy Players at 
the O'Farrell Street theater and those 
who have seen it arc a unit in proclaim- 
ing that it will run "The Cat and the 
Canary" a close race fur an attendance 
record. 

(Continued on r.iu<- 22) 



ALCAZAR 

O'Farrell Street at Powell 

Telephone Kearny T«<» 

STARTING ^»Miv\ NltiHT, JAN. n 

SeatH N<»w* 

Till: HENRI DUFP1 PLAYERS 

i* eaent 

\ in.ii Load "i i-nutrhN 

"JUST MARRIED" 

Ily Ike Author Of "AMe*fl IrUI. RoM" 

Si. Ji ::, 
in Matinees Wednesday, Thursday 
Sal u: day 



^you pay no more* 
> 6 % 



BESTFLOWEIg 




"nie\bioe of a Thousand Gardens* 

224 226 Giani Avt lei Kearny 4975 



Amusements 



ALEXANDRIA 

18th and Geary 



Pola Negri 

in "Forbidden 

Paradise" 



CASINO 1 "Cystine of the 

_,,. . .. Hungry Heart 

Ellis and Mason J b J 



CAMEO 



)_ "Let Women 
936 Market St. 1 Alone" 

CURRAN }" The Goose Hangs 

Geary, Nr. Mason J Hl S n 

CALIFORNIA 1 Pola in Negri 

4th and Market J "East of Suez" 

Fritz Leiber in Reper- 
toire, Opening With 
"The Three 
Musketeers" 



COLUMBIA 

Eddy and Mason 



CAPITOL 

64 Ellis St. 



"White Collars" 



GRANADA 

1066 Market St. 



"A Man Must 
Live" 



GOLDEN GATE 1 Vau and viIle 



G. G. Ave. and Taylor. 



Pictures 



IMPERIAL 

1077 Market St. 



"Greed" 



LOtW'S 

mi FIELD } M £™?' 

988 Market St. > Marriage 



METROPOLITAN! 



Buster Keaton 



2055 Union St. 



i "The Navigator" 



NEW FILLMORE, 

NEW MISSION T " Manhattan " 

ORPHEUM 1 

O'Farrell and Powell.) 



Vaudeville 



STRAND 

965 Market St. 



'Friend Wife" 



WILKES £™; r n Kolb in &Din 

Geary and Mason J "Politics" 



Concerts 



COLUMBIA 



Sunday Afternoon 

January 11 
Schumann-Heink 



1 January 15. Night 

AUDITORIUM MischaElman 

J With S. F. Symphony 



CURRAN 



. Friday Aft.. Jan. 16th 
| Sunday Aft., Jan. 18th 

E. Robert Schmiti 
J S. F. Symphony Soloist 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 10, 1925 






By Antoinette Arnold 



A Promenade With the Ultra-Smart. 

Window promenades a fad of the ultra-smart? Cer- 
tainly ! 

They are crowding bridge and mah jongg for favoritism 
and popularity. Fortunately for dealers and merchants, 
these promenades are not all on what might be termed the 
leeward side of the window. 

Invariably they culminate within the luxurious show 
rooms, at some objective point. Or, at the display desk, or 
the beveled glass counter. The promenades are but pre- 
ambles of a shopping adventure. They precede purchases. 

San Francisco's show windows are proverbially allur- 
ing. 

There is a decided magnetism about them. They are 
exceptionally artistic in their decorative scheme and per- 
suasion. They challenge shops of style centers, anywhere. 

It is they, really, that are responsible for the fashionable 
window promenades. Prominent visitors enroute from 
European cities to the shores of Honolulu or the ( Irient, or 
returning this way to New York and other commanding 
places of feminine longing, exclaim out loud about our 
shops, and our shop windows. So why shouldn't we? 

This new fad. window promenading, has taken hold of 
the conservatives and the enthusiasts alike. In this pre- 
miere shopping expedition, one may acquire style knowl- 
edge to add to a cherished idea or original taste and in- 
clination. That is one reason for their favoritism. 

Debutantes, wise in young ways, sense the valuation of 
window displays. They see themselves as others might 
see them before the testing glare of real daylight. Thus 
are the)' aided in decisions. The idea is not so bad. when 
one stops to analyze. 

Besides, the windows of our marvelous city are wonder- 
ful. 

Years ago, so grandmama says, it was the correct and fash- 
ionable thing to promenade along old Kearny Street on a 
Saturday afternoon attired in fashion's latest and best. 
Ladies, fine and sedate; debutantes, graceful and not-so- 
sedate, joined in the Kearny Street promenade. 

It was the custom, so grandmama says. She knows, for, 
she was mighty fashionable herself. She is grand and 
fashionable, yet. 

Those Kearny Street promenades were in days, long. 
long ago. Before most of us were born, I guess. 

Today, the favored time for window promenades along 
our shopping thoroughfares is mostly on Monday, it seems ; 
after the luncheons and teas at famous hostelries. 

Limousines await fair owners at entrances of the shops. 
But the promenades along the down-town avenues are be- 
tween the limousine calls. Ladies, charmingly dressed in 
gorgeous gowns, handsome furs and becoming chapeaux; 
debutantes, exquisitely wrapped in latest modes and chic 
little hats, go trippingly along the tours of the window 
promenade. Unconsciously, they add to the pictures as 
they go. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter 6130 Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



They gain in healthful exercise, as well. 

Promenades are direct contributions to the ensemble 
loveliness of our land. They give direct and convincing 
evidence of prosperity. They play a part which pronounces 
this West and the inhabitants, thereof; happy, glorious, 
opulent and abundantly appreciative of wdiat commerce, 
art, and trade can offer. 

The wondrous shop windows are not only tempting, al- 
luring magnetic and beautiful — they have a positive value 
in visualizing worth and its radiating good. 



Cap and Bells 

The literary section of Cap and Bells Club is presenting 
an unusually interesting and attractive program for the 
meeting to be held on Thursday, January 15 in the Terrace 
Room of the Fairmont Hotel. 

Esther Birdsdall Darling author of "Baldy of Nome" will 
be an honor guest and speaker on "Finding the Literary 
Trail." Mrs. J. A. Simpson will review Mrs. Darling's book 
and Harry A. James, lecturer, will speak. Harry McKnight 
will sing with Mrs. D. Richard Martens as accompanist. 

Mrs. Jesse Whited. past president of the club and as- 
sociate chairman of the section of which Josephine Wilson 
is chairman, has charge of the day. 

The Rev. Claude J. Pernin, dean of the extension divis- 
ion. Loyola University. Chicago, and head of the English 
department with classes of 3,000 teachers as students will 
be an honor guest and speaker. 



Rev. Pernin is national director of the series of pageants 
written by Rev. Daniel J. Lord, including "The Pageant of 
Youth" a symbolical musical masque which has just con- 
cluded a most successful production in large eastern cities. 
Rev. Pernin is the pioneer radio-broadcaster of America and 
has given lectures on "Twenty Minutes of Good Reading" 
every Thursday night from the Chicago broadcasting sta- 
tion. At the Cap and Bells literary meeting the Rev. Per- 
nin will speak on the influence of pageantry as a moral 
and educational influence. Mrs. J. Emmet Hayden is presi- 
dent of the club. 

* * * 

At The St. Francis 

Two distinct events recently attracted society to their 
usual Monday rendezvous at one of our lovely down-town 
hotels, the St. Francis, where tables especially prepared 
were pleasant assembling places for coteries of friends. 

Among the prominent leaders of the social set were many 
from Burlingame. as usual, some of whom were attired in 
the latest bits of fashion's dictates with the stamp of Paris 
or New York, or best of all. an air of our own smartest 
shops undeniably about them. 

Mrs. Richard McCreery was hostess to a group, with her 
mother, Mrs. Wayne Cuyler, as her favored guest. Mrs. 
McCreery wore a black satin coat made up with wide bands 
of sealskin, a bunch of white violets being the only bit of 
contrast. Her small hat was made of satin. 

Mrs. Harry H. Scott, who returned to this city after 
her long eastern sojourn, appeared in an adorable frock 
of tan kasha cloth of the stylish sunburnt shade. 

Mrs. George Cameron, in the same party with Mrs. Scott. 



January 10, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




Mrs. Walter Martin and Mrs. Augustus Tay- 
lor, looked as charming as ever. Green was 
the favored color adopted by many of the 
smart set. A long coat and small felt hat to 
match was worn by Mrs. Martin. 

Mrs. Kenneth Walsh and Mrs. Bliss Rucker, 
two brides of the past year, were both at- 
tired in that new shade of tan which baffles 
description, but looks soft and inviting to the 
eye. 

Mrs. Edward Tobin, who always looks lovely 
was particularly attractive in a cape and dress 
of black velvet. The short skirt attracted 
commending comment, for that, we know, is 
fashion's verdict and we are not seemingly 
offended by the fact at all. 
* * * 

Gold Mardi Gras Ball 

An animated contest is being conducted for 
the honor of being queen of the Gold Mardi 
Gras Ball on January 24 in the San Francisco 
Auditorium. Eight candidates have been chosen 
so far with all the excitement, suspense and 
fascination contests provide. 

Those already high in the reckonings for choice are an- 
nounced as follows: Mrs. George Hearst, Miss Constance 
White, Miss Claudine Spreckels, Mrs. Coy Filmer, Mrs. 
Nion Tucker, Mrs. Herbert Fleishhacker, Mrs. Arthur Rose 
Vincent, Mrs. Phillips Dunn, Mrs. W. W. Crocker. 

Mrs. George Bowles is making up the personnel of the 
court of ladies-in-waiting to the queen and most of these 
have been chosen from among the debutante set with sev- 
eral of the brides of the past year. 

The sale of tickets is now on. With each ticket for danc- 
ing there is a coupon for fifty votes. For the spectators 
tickets, which are $2.50, there are twenty-five votes. The 
tickets are to be had at Sherman & Clay's. 

Reservation for the dinner dance on January 19 should 
be made at room 616, Hotel St. Francis. This is expected 
to be a merrv night, probably nearly as lively as the ball 
itself. 

Among those who will have dinner parties on the contest 
night are: 

Messrs. and Mesdames: Latham McMullin, Augustus 
Taylor, Charles B. Henderson. Laurance I. Scott, Henry 
Foster Dutton, Robert Miller, W. H. Crocker, Miss Emily 
Carolan. 

As the Hotel St. Francis is also having the supper in 
charge on the night of the ball at the Auditorium, both 
reservations may be made at the same time. The floor 
committee, of which Milton Esberg is chairman, also plan- 
active participation in the affair. Associated with Mr. Fs- 
berg are : 

Messrs: Russell Slade. Alexander Rutherford, George 
Montgomery, Edmunda Lyman, Robert S. Muller, Roj 
Pike, Geoffrev Montgomery, Bliss Rucker. Henry Foster 
1 hitton. Coy Filmer. 

* * * 

A private .-.bowing of the portrait- of Lulo de Blaas Mon- 
day attracted a smart audience at the St. Francis. Today 
and tomorrow tin' sixteen canvases are on public exhibi- 
tion. Eleven of the sixteen portrait subjects belong ti 
Francisco and peninsula society. 



Mrs. Richard F. Doyle (Gladys Sullivan) was hostess 

at an enjoyable children's party on Saturday afternoon, the 
party taking place at the lovely home of her aunt. Mis- 
Mary Phelan, on Washington street. 

The party marked the first birthday of little Alice Doyle. 
The mothers of the babies at the party were entertained at 
Many of the tiny guests were accompanied by their 
nurses. 



HOTEL. CANTERBURY 
T30 Sutler Street 

San Francisco's Finest 

Family Hotel 

250 Rooms 

Rates: From $2.50 per day 



Miss Phyllis Fay is leaving this week for 
the Atlantic Coast. She will be a guest of Cap- 
tain and Mrs. Powers Symington (Maud Fay), 
the latter an aunt of the debutante. Later on 
Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Fay will go to New York 
to bring their daughter home. In New York 
they will be joined by Mr. and Mrs. Paul 
Fay. 

* * * 

Wedding of Distinction 

Society is on the qui vive over the coming- 
wedding of Miss Edith Grant and Mr. William 
A. Magee Jr., which will take place on Febru- 
ary eleven at the handsome home of the bride's 
parents. 

The wedding will- be one of the most fash- 
ionable events of the season. No one knows 
the first thing about the details of decorations, 
the color scheme or just what new fascinating 
plan the brilliant bride-to-be has in the back 
of her head. Some of the bridesmaids might 
tell, but they won't. The young men in the 
bridal escort claim that they know, but they 
just won't tell, either. 



THE 

Crocker National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 



■-H"»ii<9*-»- 



CONDITION AT THE CLOSE OF BUSINESS 
DECEMBER 31, 1924 

Resources: 

Loans and Discounts $29,052,698.93 

U. S. Bonds and Certificates 14,388,715.81 

Other Bonds and Securities 2,684,201.40 

Capital Stock in Federal Reserve Bank of S. F 225 000.00 

Customers' Liability Under Letters of Credit 3,095,730.80 

Cash and Sight Exchange 10,665,978.81 

$60,112,325.75 
Liabilities: 
Capital $ 2,000,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 7,618,675.84 

Circulation 2,000,000 00 

Letters of Credit 3,148,474.83 

Deposits 45,345,175.08 

$60,1 12,325.75 

oaeem 

WM. H. CROCKER, President 

iAS i. PAGAN, Vice-President A. C READ, Assistant Cashier 

i B McCARGAR, Vlce-Presl- w. D. LUX, Assistant c'ashi.-r 

dent .1. A. ROUNDS, Assistant 

WILLIAM W. CROCKER, Vice- Cashier 

r'TTw'tLLts. Vice-Presiden, * * "^ :,:,S " X ' Assls,am 

and Cashier ,.,-,''.' , d-b,dm i- ■. .-„. 

D .1 MURPHY. Vlce-Presidenl '•''■"■ •'■ KERN, Assistant 
Q w. EBNER, Assistant ' ashler 

-hi,. r .1. F. SULLIVAN, Jr., Assist- 
B |i DEAN, Assistant Cashier ant Cashier 

H C SIMPSON, Manager For- H. H. HAIGHT, Asst. Manager 
• iirn Department Foreign Departmmi 

Q, PERIS BALDWIN, Audit. .r 

u. ..in: ,.i Dlreetorai 

WM it CR( ICKER R s Mi " IRE 

TEMPLETON CROCKER CHAS K. GREEN 

IAS i PAGAN & P. B MORSE 

■;i: w sroTT i n Mr :argar 

WILLIAM W. CROCKER A G. GRIFFIN 

ATHOLL McBEAN 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 10, 1925 






fina ncial ; 



By Edward H. Manning 

I am asked my opinion of all kinds of speculative deals, but 
it is not the function of a financial writer to adopt the 
role of a security tipster. The most he can do is to [ay 
down principles, and discuss from time to time the position 
of groups; mentioning particular opportunities more to 
warn than to enthuse. If he knows his subject, his readers 
will be able to gather from reading between the lines the 
course to be pursued. Always, it must be remembered that 
forecasts, however well founded, are liable to be falsified 
through the subsequent and sudden intrusion of factors 
from an invisible behind the horizon. 



— Having said this. 1 wish it understood, however, that 
1 shall be glad to render assistance to anyone at any time. 
The power that aims at shaping our destinies would other- 
wise be baulked of its desires. 



— For those who are in a position to devote a month to 
a charming and instructive experience. Panama Pacific 
line and the Santa Fe railway have a treat in store. A valen- 
tine of an unusual character, though the usual trimmings 
of the saint's providing may be found by those to whom 
his little ways appeal. Leaving here on the steamer "Fin- 
land," on the fourteenth of next month, a club de luxe 
water and rail tour is being planned by the companies 
mentioned. Max A. Podlech. in charge, it is announced. 
Mrs. Max Podlech will be with the party, and, if my ex- 
perience goes for anything, the "king" will be more fitly 
described as king consort. I have been married quite a 
bit. 

* * * 

— Through the Canal to Havana, where six days will be 
spent sightseeing, thence to Miami's shores. Palm Beach. 
St. Augustine and Jacksonville, Florida, proceeding to New 
i irleans, and back to our city of cave-dwellers via the 
Grand Canyon. Everything that the heart of man (includ- 
ing his feeling better than even half) will be assured by the 
hosts, the Santa Fe furnishing a special train at Key West 
to "home" the travelers so well that they will miss nothing 
of the atmosphere that makes men great and women gra- 
cious and kindly. And won't we welcome them back and 
feast our intellects and artistic emotions on the talcs they 
will have to tell us? 

* * * 

— Sad, indeed, that my readers cannot spare me to go 
myself! 

* * * 

—Copper is running ahead of the market, if my infor- 
mation goes for anything. Fifteen cents is the most that is 
justified by present demand. The same game is being played 
in my opinion, with the metal, as has been played with 
copper securities. However, as the players are husky, it 
might be well to buy on even small reactions, unless you 
are prepared to be left out of the program. Obviously, you 
will be making friends with the children of mammon, but 
"it has to be done." The cheap producers offer the best 
chances, such as Chile Copper. And watch what the Brit- 
ish groups are doing in South America. 

(Continued on Paeo 20) 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

[LATELY THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY) 
SAVINGS „ COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banksin California, 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

by mergers orconsolidationswith other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Bank3 of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1924 

Assets $96,917,170.69 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,003,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 461,746.52 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HA1GHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (4}4) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 
Paid Dp Capital $20.01)0.000 (20,000,000 Itrnrrve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued. CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES 
THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON. ENG.; NEW YORK; 
PORTLAND. ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

San Franclaco Ollice: 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COI'LTIIAHD 

Mnnagrcr Ann!. Mnnngrcr 







MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douclas 2244 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 
208 Crocker Building (Opposite Palace Hotel) San Francisco 
Phone Kearny 391 




"Mayerle's Eyewater' 



^aESSSff 



For »U yearn 

for .-liihi-in 
by m nil 70c. 



I In- niOMt popular I've Tonic 
ml inliilis. At ilitiivn isi.x .'..". •, 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

Walter W. Derr, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 

MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 



"The Largest Fire Insurance 
Company in America" 

Fire, Automobile, Windstorm. 
Tourists' Baggage Insurance 
: : REASONABLE RATES 



George Mayerle, Expert Optician, 960 Market Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



January 10, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 




DIVIDEND NOTICES 



The Dirt Situation 

Newspapers, civic organizations and 
health authorities have been recent- 
ly uniting in effort to enforce clean 
city streets and the effort is commend- 
able — though apparently abortive. 
Since the campaign began some weeks 
ago, and though the urge was ably 
seconded by some generous downpours 
from above, our thoroughfares have 
not quickened to the cleansing — In fact 
there seems to be more dirt in evi- 
dence than ever before in their dirty 
history. And there are reasons for 
this, but the papers, for reasons best 
known to themselves, are not hitting 
the evil where it should be swatted. 
For instance : the Board of Public 
Works is the champion dirt diffuser by 
reason of its undeviating permissive 
attitude ; builders are allowed without 
restriction, except as to space, to dump 
their materials on sidewalk and street 
without containing boards or barriers 
to keep it from scattering" broadcast. 
That body allows wreckers and exca- 
vators to remove material which has 
not been dampened and in leaky or 
overloaded conveyances that drop a 
continuous litter from source to final 
disposal. 

Then the Board of Supervisors and 
the Health Deparlment: jointly these 
bodies allow the garbage trust, uncov- 
ered wagons to course our streets wast- 
ing their unfragrant littenngs upon the 
city air. Even though the drivers of 
these vehicles do belong to a power- 
ful union and wield a nasty vote, it is 
no reason why citizens not seeking 
votes should be subjected to the in- 
tolerant nuisance. 

Then the cops — those, at times, 
seemingly stone blind guardians of our 
weal — why, the little merchants along 
our main fares regularly indulge a 
Sweepout into the gutter any old time 

right under the bluccoat's or tancoat's 
nose and narry a protest — an arrest is 
entirely out of the question. So much 
for those we pay to see the laws are 
Observed and certainly the above is 
sufficient indictment. 

Now for those of the inhabitants — 
.oul their name is legion— who seem to 
have a natural affinity for dirt; we do 
not refer to the professional open air 
toothpickers, the street and public con- 
veyance self-manicurists who deem 
their dirty dexterity an art, the self- 
sat islied ear and nasal excavators and 
the sundry human animals who plague 
our existence and originate nervous 
prostration ' No, no law governs them. 



and we fear no legislation will be ef- 
fected to stop their nauseating prac- 
tices so long as a good representation 
of their kind grace our legislative halls ; 
we refer to the folk naturally inclined 
to be dirty — the grownups who would 
think the town a deserted village un- 
less they see the streets littered; the 
genus who reason a street pavement 
should be made homelike — to them, 
what is home without a little mess? 
They are among the chief offenders. 

Such is the status of our town and 
the reasons ; there are ways out of it, 
hut the press must get on the right 
track ; otherwise it shall be continued 
to-be broadcasted: "San Francisco 
Knows How" — to be dirty! 



Keeping the Pork Pots Boiling 

THE recently proposed amendment 
of Senator Bruce of Maryland to 
have the personnel of the corporation 
which is to operate Muscle Shoals come 
under civil service was overwhelm- 
ingly — and logically — beaten. Did the 
merit system go into effect, the big 
affair would be as clean of patronage 
troughs as Mother Hubbard's cupboard, 
and what would the poor polies do then? 
To the average politician, civil service 
is anathema, and no other course of 
action by Congress may be expected in 
the big Shoals enterprise, as to do 
otherwise would extract eight and a 
fraction of the big political feline's 
proverbial nine lives and effect a con- 
sequent elimination of the pork barrel 
sustenance. Will President Coolidge, 
despite his bumptious allusion to civil 
service in his recent message, veto the 
legislation when finally effected ? 
Would a fish hope the ocean'd dry up? 
* * * 

Since our "literary" dailies have seen 
fit to publish "My Sweetheart" by Kid 
McCoy and label it a "poem," all the 
doggerel constructors may take heart. 



Lucky for us the Prince of Wales is 
given to forgetting. At a Thanksgiv- 
ing Day dinner in London the other 
day he declared his visit to the United 
States was "a thrill that can come 
only once in a lifetime." and stressed 
how much regard he had for Will Rog- 
ers, what he thought of our Woohvorth 
Building, the great subways and the 
Chicago stockyards. Apparently and 
consolingly he has forgotten all about 
the damphool females who beseeched 
him to walk on their neck-. 



The San Francisco Bank 

(I.VTELV THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS 
AND LOAN SOCIETY) 

526 California St. (and Branches), 
San Francisco 



For the quarter year ending December 31st, 
1924. a dividend has been declared at the rate 
of four nml one quarter (4'4) per cent per 
annum on all deposits, payable on and after 
January 2nd. 1925. Dividends not called for 
are added to the deposit account and earn 
interest from January 1st, 1925. Deposits 
made on or before January 10th. 1925, will 
earn interest from January 1st. 1925. 

A. H. MULLER, Secretary. 



BANK OF ITALY 

Head Office .mil San Frnneisco UrnncbeH 

For the half year ending December 31, 1924, 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of 
four (4) per cent per annum on all Savings 
Deposits, payable on and after January 2, 
1925. Dividends rrot called for are added to 
and bear the same rate of interest as the 
principal from January 1, 1925. SAVINGS 
DEPOSITS MADE ON THE FIRST BUSINESS 
DAY OF ANY MONTH (OR ON OR BEFORE 
THE TENTH DAY OF JANUARY. APRIL. 
JULY AND OCTOBER) WILL EARN INTER- 
EST FROM THE FIRST OF THAT MONTH; 
DEPOSITS MADE AFTER SAID DATE WILL 
BARN INTEREST FROM THE FIRST OF 
THE FOLLOWING MONTH. 

JAMES A. BACIGALUPI, President. 



Italian American Bank 

8. B. corner Montgomery and Sacramento 
sts.; North Beach Branch, corner Columbus 
ave. and Broadway; Columbus Brancn, corner 
Montgomery and Washington sts. — For the 
hall" year ending December 31. 1924, a divi- 
dend has been declai ed at the rate of four 
and mie-i|uarter (4V4) per cent per annum on 
all savings deposits, payable on and after 
January 2, 1925. Dividends not called for will 
i added to the principal and bear the same 
rate of interest from January 1, 1925. De- 
posits made on or before January 10, 1925. 
will earn interest from January 1, 1925. 

A. E. SBARBORO. President 



The Hibernia Savings 
and Loan Society 

Main Office, corner Market, McAllister and 
Jones Ms.. Mission Office, corner Valencia and 

L'^.l sts. — For the half year ending !■ i- ii.' r 

::i. 1924, a dividend has been declared at the 
i four )4> per cent per annum on all 
deposits, payable ^n and after Fi iday. Janu- 
ary 2. 1925. Dividends not drawn will be 
to depositors' accounts, become a pari 
t and will earn dividends from January 
]. 1!'..".. Deposits made on or before January 
10. 1925. will earn interest from January 1, 
i g .' s 

J. O. TOB1N. Vice-President. 



The French- American Bank 

;s Department), l^s Sutter st. and 
Branches — For the half year ending Decem- 
ber SI, 192-1. a dividend has been dcclaied at 
the rate of four and one -quarter ( 4 % i per 
cent per annum on all deposits, payable on 
and after January 2. 19 25. Dividends not 
called for are added to and bear the same 
if interest as the principal from January 
1. 1925. Deposits made on or before January 
10, 1926, will earn interest from January 1. 

i.KON bopql'KRAZ. President. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 10, 1925 




WHERE TO DINE 



By Hoot McGregor 
Trans-bay Shriners to hold mammoth golf tourney. 



The Van Ness boys play their best golf down the ave- 
nue. 



Ernest West wil hook up with Dr. C. H. Whitley for 
the sleeves out of his vest. 



Ernest Lang will play with his new Lacquer ball. 



Dr's. Aaron and Lewis Green will demonstrate a few 
hospital shuts. 



Duke Du Common will play for the Bass-Hueter Cup. 



(ius Lachman has offered one of his 22 floors as a trophy. 



Frank Kreesling will render an official opinion on all the 
shots. 



Dr Harry Brownell, the Monterey golf whiz, will be 
there. 



Bill Crocker will lend his moral support. 



The Bernard brothers — Howard the soap king, Ed the 
Mohawk baby, and Al. the Silicate expert hope to grab 
off a championship. 



Bill Wentz says its a cinch he'll win if Zip, the Caddie, 
will pack for him. 



Harold Balantine, the shoe man, will try and put the 
jinx on Herb Bilsbrough of 5S5 fame. 



Bill Newhouse wil play his brother Hugo for an option 
on the Kohl Building. 



Dr. George McClure will twist a few with his mashie. 



Frank Nestroy the classy tailor, former champion of Mil- 
waukee will hook up with Captain Pierce. 



Arthur Heinz will play one of his 57 varieties. 



Charlie "Grandpa" Goodwin says he's sure to cop the 
Grandfather's cup. 



Billy Wooden, the pote from the logging supply camp, 
will introduce his famous shafts. 



George Habernicht is banking on making the course the 
same dav. 



Harry Hannan the encyclopedia from the Palace, will 
be at the first tee to answer all enquiries. 



Harry Foster, one of the rocking chair boys, will write his 
score on the porch. 



Dr. Bob Lorentz, the Beau Brummel of the medical pro- 
fession, will sport some of his 15 trunks of glad rags. 



CAFE MARQUARD 




Adjoining Wilkes and Curran 

Theaters, Geary and Mason. 

Phone Prospect 61 

1925 REVUE 

Sparkling Entertainment 
DINING— DANCING 

After-Theater Suppers 
Superb Service 



Barbecue 

Chill Con Carnr 

Coffee 




Enchiladas 

Tamnlei* 

llrolled Stuaks 



Red Bull Pit 

72 EDDY STREET, San Francisco 
JOE W. ANDERSON, Prop. Telephone Douglas 6198 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

THE MOST POPULAR RESTAURANT IS SAN FRANCISCO 

<;■". Post Street. Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4536 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners. $1.25. Meals Served a la Carte. 

Also Regular French and Italian Dinners. 

Flub and Game n Specialty 



BLANCO'S 



O'Farrell and I.nrkln Streets Phone Franklin 

No visitor shoutd leave the city without dining 
in the finest cafe in America 
Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.'t ..... 7.-, c 

Dinner. Week Days _-_---- $1.!W» 

Dinner. Sunday* and Holidays ..... 91.7.1 



The only real artistic place in the Latin Quarter. Bohemian 

dinner. 75c — served every evening. Saturday. Sunday and 

Holidays, $1.25. Dancing from 7 to 1 every evening. 

BEGIN'S BOLOGNA RESTAURANT 



240 Columbus Avenue 



Phone Sutter 8825 



Tenuis Cerles. Tpsti Barrere. -Tnhrt Plegfth. Props, 

NEW SHARON GRILL 

Formerly Bergez-Frank's Old Poodle Dog, Bush Street 

35 NEW MONTGOMERY STREET 

Opposite Palace Hotel Phone Sutter 8008 




Mary Hereth Caroline Jones 

Luncheon is served from 1 1 :30 to 2 :30 
and tea from 3 to 5 



'*7£a 



334 Sutter St. 



Douglas 7118 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

S3 Third Avenue. BAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 

Open From 

11:30 a. m. to 2:30 p. m. 

5:30 p. m. to 8:30 p. m. 

Sundays and Holidays 

■1:30 to 8:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 

Hnlf Block f-oni Hlirhvray 



January 10, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



Pete Gerhardt claims that he can make the course in two 
hours flat. 



Al Samuels, the Market Street Jeweler, must have one 
of his lucky wedding rings hooked on his driver. 



Hugh McKevitt, the attorney, has asked for restraining 
order to prevent Jack Houston, the publisher, from kidding 
him while he putts. 



George Letterby, the organ man, is sometimes known as 
the "Musical Golfer." 



John McNab, the Scotch lawyer, spent the night at Lake- 
side, but he found the lost ball. 



Dave Crowley, the launch king, got lost in the fog on 
Lakeside Sunday and came near being shot-up as a rum- 
runner. 



Ed Bernard, the gasoline agent, claims he is now "Mon- 
arch" of all golfers. 



Frank Keesling has filed suit to make Will Crocker, the 
banker, buy a new golf suit. 



The Board of Health will have sanitary plumbing now 
that Frank J. Klimm has been reappointed a member. 



Whit Prentiss of the Phoenix Desk Co., has been .crowned 
the rocking chair golf champion of Lakeside. 



As a golf player Reggie Marrack is a marvelous music 
teacher. 



Milt Prittle, the builder, plans to construct some side- 
boards for the Lakeside fairways. 



Neal Shoor, the diamond merchant, always tries to knock 
a homerun with' his putter. 



E. F. Warren, the federal agent, is frequently called upon 
to solve the mystery of a lost ball. 



Al Gump has placed his last score card along with some 
of the most priceless treasures in his Post Street shop. 

A. L. Brown still claims to be the only man in California 
who quit business for golf. 



Bob Matthey, of the Du Pont Company, believes a little 
of his own powder would be excellent medicine for talk- 
ative golfers. 

Big Hearted Johnny Crow always gives the boys a drink 
out of one of his vacuum cups. 



She— Before we were married you called me an angel. 

He — I know it. 

"But now you don't call me anything." 

"That shows mv self-control." 



"Oh, I think I'm getting on. Last night he asked me to 

call him by his first name!" 

"Pooh, that's nothing I I wouldn't trust any man till he 
called me by his last name." 

Magistrate: "Can't this case be settled out of court!'" 
O'Grady: "That's what we were trying to do. your 
honor, when the police interfered." 



Time 




Card 



THE DEPENDABLE AITOMOIII LE FERRY Route offer* 
motorists (In- shortest nnd most direct mean* of transporta- 
tion from Onklnml. Snn Krnnclsco. ami all point* south, to 
Vnllejo. Sacramento, Sonoma, ftapu and Luke Counties and 
nil imh'dim north. 



Leave Oakland 


111 


Leave 


Vallejo 


Side 


at 


O 


Sic 


e at 


"SHORT 


•WAY" 


> 


MORROW COVE 


A.M. 


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t6:00 


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•Snturilajs. Sundays, Holiday** — Extra Trips Daring; Heavy 
Traffic. f Sundays and Holidays only. 

AVE.X J. H.WFORD, Pres. and Gen. Mgr. 



[COOKS] 



TICKETS ISSUED 

To All 

PARTS OF THE WORLD 

INCLUSIVE INDEPENDENT TOURS 
ITINERARIES FURNISHED 

CRUISES SUPREME 

MEDITERRANEAN 
Leaving New York January 24, 1925 

ROUND THE WORLD 
Leaving New York January 22, 1925 

Write for Booklets 



128 Sutter Street 



San Francisco 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 10, 1925 




IPW T?©1£ 




By KEM 

"The essay is thus a literary creation to the making of which go 
mood and form; . . . 'tis an Ariel among literary kinds, shy, airy, 
tricksy, elusive, vanishing in the garish light that beats down 
upon the arena where the big prizes of Action are competed for 
amidst noise, confusion and eclat." 

Richard Burton in "Force in Fiction." 

DEFINITIONS, by Henry Seidel Canby, we are told, 
"contains brief essays upon tendencies, prejudices and 
perplexities in literature — a book OF, not ON, criticism — 
a mirror reflecting the vigorous, turbulent, successful years 
of 1922, 1923 and 1924." This is truly a feast for the schol- 
arly reader or one who temporarily tires of the novel or 
wearies of the rhythm of poetry. There are chapters on 
"The Age of Experiment," in which one learns much of 
interest about such "Experimenters" in literature as Sher- 
wood Anderson; of those who find a sense of necessity of 
coming to some conclusion as to what life is to mean "as 
shown in the criticism of Cabell and Santanyana, the poetry 
of Masefield and Vachel Lindsay, and the lyrics of Miss 
Millay; chapters on "Outlook and Insight," in which we 
are asked : "Does Mr. Hergersheimer look at the world 
about him before he begins to write, or at his own soul? 
Are Miss Lowell and Mr. Galsworthy and Mr. Masters and 
Mr. Tarkington outlookers or inseers? . . . never were 
special cases, such as diseased souls and harsh environ- 
ments, indeed every fact which is subject to observation, 
so popular. . ." But is it querulous to ask for more inseers, 
men like St. Paul, who write from a passionate meditation? 
No American novelist since Hawthorne has belonged 
wholly in that category. Other chapters follow on "Censor- 
ship," "Sex and the Censorship," "Highbrow and Low- 
brow," "A Man of Letters," and one most interesting to us, 
on "The Golden West," which tells us: "San Francisco, 
tawdry, beautiful, careless, energetic, absorbs her invaders 
. . . and by and through and of all this shall California lit- 
erature be made. There is no literature of California. What 
passes for literature there might as well be written in New 
York. . . the good books out of California are not in any 
deep-going sense Californian. Bret Harte and Joaquin 
Miller in this respect, were merely descriptive. Frank 
Norris could have applied his Russian manner more suc- 
cessfully to Kansas or Nebraska. Mrs. Atherton is national 
rather than sectional." 

"California is inexpressive in literature because she has 
not yet found her soul. . . . Most of our writers of fiction in 
particular are merely craftsmen who have no depth of emo- 
tion in themselves and no artist's responsibility to beauty 
and ultimate truth. ... In California the soul of a civiliza- 
tion itself is still nebulous. A cheerful light, a whirl uf 
energy, a spectrum of bright, contrasting colors are there, 
but the star is still in the making." 

Harcourt, Brace and Howe, $2.00. 

The Birthmark, by Eugenie Schroeder, is a new novelette 
dedicated by the author to Mrs. John F. Merrill. Proceeds 
to be offered as a gift towards the building fund of the new 
Maternity Ward of the Children's Hospital. It is an attrac- 
tive little booklet with a very artistic design on the cover 
by Vera Josephi Limbeau, one of the finest commercial 
artists in California, and a San Francisco society favorite. 
"The Birthmark" is now on sale at all bookshops. 

Hanson & Co., San Francisco, publishers, $1.00 . 



An Irish farmer had a couple of daughters who had been 
on the marriage market for some time. Numerous appli- 
cants had been refused a hearing. Recently a friend tried 
to arrange what he considered to be reasonable offers, but 
the old man would not listen, and, in reply to further argu- 
ments, said: "I know my own business; there's as good 
fish in the 'say' as ever was caught." "Aye," replied the 
friend, "but ye must remember, Dan, that the baits are 
getting stale." 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

^PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 

239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



Make yourself at home at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tillmann Place, at 241 Grant Ave. 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Rare Books — First Editions — Fine Bindings 

Importations from Zachnsdorf. Root, Morrell, etc., of London 

Commissions in London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

Thone Kearny 5816 



Be Photographed This Year on Your Birthday 



^Hec^^i^C(?j 



^gjjnsc 




STl'DIOS IN ALL 

PRINCIPAL CITIES OP 

CALIFORNIA 



Oakland 

408 M.h Street 

San FranclMCO 

41 Grant Avenue 



St. Mary's Academy 



SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 

For particulars address 
SISTER SUPERIOR 



Select Boarding and Day School Under the 
Direction of the Sisters of St. Dominic 



Established 28 Years 

EXTRA HAIR PIECES T0 
COVER THE BOB 
EVENING 



FOR 

WEAR 



NOW BEING SHOWN AT 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

815 Clement Street San Francisco 360 Geary Street 

2331 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley 
MR. AND MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Suit* Preaaed By Hnnd Only— Suits Called For and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

PARISIAN DYEING AND CLEANING 
521 Pout Street San Frnnclnco 

In Vlrelnla Hotel 



o I 
Phone Franklin 2S10 I 



January 10, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



IS 



Wheat and Chaff 

By Nathaniel Anderson 




T 



Nathaniel AnuerNOn 



'HE grief toll that pays 
for the auto speed maniac 
overburdens us. We should 
struggle for an amelioration 
from it with a will that would 
force taxes down. The money 
mulct, however, is nothing to 
the tears ground from the peo- 
ple by tearing wheels of ma- 
chines of all kinds, and the 
reckless automobile driver is 
the chief monster. Care is the 
key that will unlock the door 
to our safety, but we have to 
learn all over again what is 
really meant by being careful. 
The pace and the risk is set so 
high at present that even good 
men do not know the level of 
humane driving. We must 
take away from the rush of affairs in the great measure that 
should be given to care. 

Men of caution behind the steering wheels contend with 
the high average of recklessness, and few driving six months 
can say they have not killed or maimed. It is a dangerous 
thing to drive an automobile, and a new standard of the 
task should be set. Only the. best should be given licenses, 
after thorough tests on the highways and by-ways. They 
should be selected on application like prospects for a crack 
regiment. Fools, scamps, drunkards and weaklings should 
be forever denied, and the chosen should pay fees to and 
attend lectures on reasonable driving, being told of the 
necessities of it and psychologically trained to the idea as 
to what notions to avoid while in their scats of responsi- 
bility, and then given their licenses with the understanding 
that the finest record to make is that of no accidents. 



— I have seen and heard of some wonderful actions on the 
part of San Francisco physicians. One went to war t < • 
work there in the real spirit of the greatness of a mission. 
After the conflict he came back and applied himself to hours 
long enough and continual enough to give an over-time man 
heart failure. This doctor died, not because a bullet was 
put into him by his kind for over-working, but from the 
very effects of his strenuous labours. 1 have seen among 
other things a surgeon who was perhaps the best in the 
citv answer an accident call without a moment's delay and 
stay at his task and without knowledge of the certainty of 
his fee or mention of it. 

* * * 

— It is hard to go against the established order of thing-. 
and one should hesitate long, if not personally concerned, 
to be out of order. Where matters do not concern suffering 
to a great extent, nor are the immediate causes of dire pov- 
erty, we should move slowly against the social status, be- 
cause tin. often the rectification i- worse than the trouble, 
if trouble there is. 

The >ure movement of liberal citizenship in England 

reached a point where within a few years two lews became 

Lord Mayors of London. They could have chosen Rabbis 

for chaplaincies, but they did not, good Jew- though they 

themselves. They not only appointed clergymen of 



Golden Gate Ferry Company 

FOOT OF HYDE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
WINTER SCHEDULE 

TIME TABLE 

EFFECTIVE OCTOBER 15, 1924 



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Special Service When Traffic Requirements 



Make Necessary. 



Golden Gate Ferry Company 



"Artistic 

San Francisco" 

is a very attractive page, illustrating some of the beau- 
ties of San Francisco, and one that you will be glad to 
mail to your out-of town friends; there is also an inter- 
esting page "From Other Lands," and some attractive 
news photos taken "Around America." 



(t 



Oddities 
of Dress" 

is unique and appealing: there are picturesque views of 
■Rivers of Beauty and Fame": illustrations of "The 
Novel in Nature," and some of your favorite entertain- 
ers pictured in "Stage and Screen." The whole family 
will want to see the 



Sunday Chronicle 



Rotagravure 
Section 



16 



SAN. FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 10, 1925 



the Church of England, but amongst other established 
.contributions, they made the customary one to the Society 
for the Conversion of the Jews. 

* * * 

The nucoa was good enough for the children. That was 

the opinion of a woman in a grocery store buying a cheap 
substitute. There is no substitute for butter or anything 
else to make good blood which children need and which 
should be within the knowledge and instinct of a mother, 
with intelligence and without it. 

* * * 

—It is strange how few people know the difference of a 
sentimental value of an article and the commercial value 01 
it, or the distinction that lies in the value of objects when 
in the expensive setting of a store, after the cost of getting 
them there, and when they are unburdened with salesmen, 
etc., in a private home. Anything once privately purchased 
has' its merit in a character of use or sentiment. Yet any 
owner will often take a few articles to sell without a thought 
that his very act has released them from their best worth. 
lie does not stop to think that to make them again worthy 
citizens of the market, he would be compelled to establish a 
store and give them many like companions. He will inno- 
cently go to a dealer and grow marvelously surprised at the 
price offered. Articles taken from the home must practi- 
cally begin commercial life anew. 

* * * 

"Were you cool in battle?" asked Captain Rock. 
"Cool!" repeated truthful Eddie Jouffet. "There were 

times when I shivered." 

* * * 

He : "There's something I've been wanting to say to you 

for a long time " 

She (encouragingly) : "Yes?" 

He: You've got a black smudge on your nose — ><»,t. 

I think !" 

* * * 

Patroness — "Where is mv seat?" 
Usher— "At the end of U." 
Patroness — "Sir." 




TRADEMARK,. -p- -«■ /"V * 1 

mf Motor Oils 




Are recognized by the highest authorities In engine 
building as the most economical, efficient and uniform in 
quality — 

A PURE PENNSYLVANIA PRODUCT 

VALVOLINE OIL COMPANY 

462 Bryant St., San Francisco 122 Center St., Los Angeles 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some i h ink that a vlgoroBK Lrusliintr once or i wire a day In 
taking very good care of them. Ili-in-h injr 1m only n part of the 
IirooeftN. Alnny iliiims can happen to your teeth which only a 
competent dentist can take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not he as sound ;ts you Imagine. A toothache means 
(rouble; do not wait for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gnim troubles that will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth sore? Do your kuiiin bleed? Call In today 
nnd talk It over. It will cost nothing. My nerve blocking: sys- 
tem blocks oil all nerves and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfield 335 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Croirnai Self Cleaning Brldccs) 

Porcelain Work and Roofless Plntes 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED AND GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per day; V7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Stornge of Automobiles 



130 



SANITARY DRINKING WATER 

For Homes, Offices and Factories. Quality Guaranteed 

KEYSTONE WATER COMPANY 

Russ St. Phone Hemlock 170 San Francisco 



Experienced, reliable Real Estate man will manaae and 
develop large Realty holdings or administer office building or 
apartment houses. Rents properly collected and rem.tted. 
Reasonable percentage. Highest references. Bond furnished 
superior to cash handled. 

L. C. TAMM, 628 Montgomery Street 



ARE YOUR BRAKES SAFE? 

e Specialize on Brakes Only-— Flat Prices on .-111 Cars 

S. F. BRAKE SERVICE 

ST. FRANCIS GARAGE, 1240 POST STREET 

(Bet. Van Ness Ave. and Franklin St.) 

Phone Prospect 1915 



RAPID PROGRESS ON BIG POWER HOUSE 
Pacific Gas and Electric Company's Pit No 3 development in 
Shasta County is progressing rapidly. This big 108,000 horsepower 
plant was started January 1924 and will be placed in operation 
about July 1st, 1925. The section of Penstock pipe on the flat car 
is 10 feet in diameter. Three large Penstocks each 313 feet long 
will carry water from the tunnel outlet on the mountainside to 
the generators. 



1110 GE III! ST. 



TE1 


,. FRANKLIN 


::(is.-, 


Metal Wo- 

^ — w^ 1 :< i <i i ti - to 

^Ssfcts^ hlli' ci\>- 

JlivllrjNv " e III In k - 


k Apper- 

Autuiiio- 

\eetj lene 

- 11 !«, -k- 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



January 10, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



Petrol Paragraphs 




o 



By E. V. Weller 
National Automobile Club 

A New Petrified Forest 

NE of the strangest districts' in Cal- 
> , ifornia is to be found about twenty 
miles outside of Mojave on the Owens 
River Valley route, about 135 miles from 
Los Angeles. 

The center of this district is the little 
town of Ricardo, located in the heart of 
Red Rock Canyon. Here the eyes of the 
motorist are greete:l with a vision of the 
canyon as it widens out in'.o a natural 
amphitheatre, the walls of which are 
lined with the burrowings of pioneer 
miners. The cataclysmic formations of 
multi-colored rocks are piled, wedged 
and jammed into grotesque forms which 
suggest a story of tempest and upheaval 
too mighty to contemplate. It would 
seem as though a giant hand had shuffled 
these slabs of rock as one would a deck 
of cards; then growing tired or disgusted 
with the game, the dealer had cast them 
into an immense pile, some flat, some 
end on end. others at dizzy angles which 
Beem to defy every law of gravity. Seen 
in the last glows of a setting sun. one can 
easily imagine a horde of worshippers on 
their way to temple or shrine. Sharp 
ledges hundreds of feet high seem to be 
fashioned in forms resembling temple or 
cathedral, sculptured with mighty tools 
and with a symmetry carefully conceived. 

A well maintained grade has been con- 
structed through the gorge, but the 
:rookedness of the canyon requires care- 
ful driving, Twelve miles east of Ri- 
cardo lies the newly found Petrified 
Forest. The path thereto is not well 
known and care shoul 1 be exercise 1 in 
leaving Ricardo that the small wooden 
sign denoting the route to Petrified For- 
est is not overlooked, About a year ago 
this region was first made accessible by 
foot and horse trails and since then a 
great deal of exploitation work has been 



carried on. The forest is located among 
the rocky hills known as the El Paso 
Mountains. There are found skeletons 
of mastodons and other prehistoric ani- 
mals which cast revealing glimpses into 
the past — when the world was still 
young. A number of interesting fossils 
have been uncovered and the investiga- 
tions now being carried on have brought 
to light many specimens of fossilized 
flora and fauna which tend to prove that 
this arid land was at one time a tropical 
forest. 

With the aim of safeguarding the 
interests of the motor vehicle own- 
er in matters of legislation and tax- 
ation, the Automotive Protective League 
of California was organized in San 
Francisco last week. Included in its 
membership are representatives of all 
fields of automobile activity who take a 
prominent part in California legislative 
matters and who are vitally interested in 
the welfare of the industry they repre- 
sent. Col. William F. Culberson of San 
Francisco was elected chairman of the 
Executive Committee of the League and 
Robert W. Martland of Oakland was 
chosen Secretary. At the organization 
meeting, the following were named as 
members of the Executive Committee : 
William F. Culberson, of the Motor Car 
Dealers' Association of San Francisco ; 
Robert W. Martland, of the California 
Automobile Trade Association ; A. F. 
Lemberger, of the National Motor Ve- 
hicle Conference; Arthur H. Samish, of 
the Motor Carriers' Association of Cali- 
fornia; Joseph F. Vizzard, of the Cali- 
fornia Truck Owners' Association; C. R. 
Stevens, of the General Petroleum Cor- 
poration; W. E. Farr, of the Motor 
Truck Division of the San Francisco 
Motor Car Dealers' Association; E, V. 
Weller. of the National Automobile 
Club; C. P. Clark, of the National Auto- 
mobile Chamber of Commerce, and Capt. 
C, Thompson, of the Draymen's Associ- 
ation of California. 

Articles of association were drawn up 
and approved, some of which are given 
herewith : 

t lertain individuals, personally inter- 
este 1 in the development of the State of 
i alifornia, the furtherance of construc- 
tion and maintenance of roads in this 
state and the encouragement and growth 
of highway transportation in the interest 
and for the benefit of the public of this 
sta'.e, have gathered together for the 
purpose of inaugurating, fostering an 1 
maintaining an organization to be known 
as the Automotive Protective League of 
'alifornia and hereby declare the prin- 
ciples of this league to be: 

That funds necessary for the mainte- 
nance an 1 reconstruction of such roa 's 
already built, as a matter of course. 
should he raised by a levy upon vehicles 
using such roads, as nearly as possible, 
in proportion to the use thereof. 



That funds should be available to the 
State officials having jurisdiction thereof 
to construct such additional highways 
and the necessary adjuncts thereto as 
may seem to be advisable, considering 
the existing volume of traffic or the lack 
of adequate facilities to care for immedi- 
ate requirements of highway transporta- 
tion. That such construction should not 
be predicated upon remote, speculative 
or distantly future needs, but should be 
confined to such highways as are immedi- 
ately imperative, and limited to funds 
which may be available without burden 
upon any property, industry or class. 

That no new or additional taxes in any 
form should be levied except upon a 
strict accounting of past expenditures, 
the results obtained therefrom, the 
present construction requirements, the 
itemized estimate of the cost of each 
unit thereof and the showing that the 
reasonably expectant revenues from 
present sources of income will be in- 
sufficient to meet such demands in the 
immediate future, not to exceed five 
years, and that the voice of those upon 
whom such taxes will fall shall the first 
be heard. 



General Auto Body Repairing 

Stationary Top General Trimming 

Telephone Market 1835 

Tom Meek 

Auto Body Building 

Company 

711) tiOLUEN GATE AVENUE 

Snn PranelacOf Cal. 

Radiator and Pender Repairing 

THOS, .1. MEEK 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 

Wilson Bros. Co. 

Incorporated 

1020-30 MARKET STREET 

Ret. Frnnklln and Goujch 

Telephone Park 27t 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 10, 1925 



Bits of Unwritten History 



By Edward S. Spring 



. x*~. Q . T-hio i« n rollection of odds and ends — queer say- 

CHAPTER XVIII 
Acuteness of Jim Keene 

FIFTY years ago, when H. H. Noble, president of the 
Cypress Lawn Cemetery Association, was an active 
broker on the San Francisco Stock and Exchange Board he 
missed earning a big commission and, at the same time, had 
an illustration of the wonderful acuteness of James K. 
Keene. This happened during the period when E. J. 
("Lucky") Baldwin was making his great deal in Upnir, 
which stock had risen to $300 a share. 

Keene was bidding Ophir up, in the thick of a crowd ot 
madlv excited brokers, in the center of the old boardroom 
on California street. Noble was in the outskirts of the 
crowd trying to execute some commission orders for vari- 
ous stocks. Of a sudden, above the din, he heard the sharp 
voice of Keene, yelling. — . ■ 

"Three hundred and ten for ten thousand Ophir! 

No one then in the boardroom, had such an amount of 
Ophir for sale; in fact, no one in the street could have sold 
and delivered 10,000 shares of Ophir at that time, outside of 
Lucky Baldwin the maker of the deal. Noble knew all this 
and it flashed upon him, that Baldwin might want to sell 
Ophir at $310 a share and, if he did, a large commission 
could be made. So he gave his order book to another broker 
— Loveland— and ran to the door, in full view, headed for 
Baldwin's office, which was close at hand. He found Bald- 
win there, busy with his private secretary, young Caval- 

lier 

"Sell him 10,000 Ophir at $310? Of course I will," said 
Baldwin. "Here, quick, Cavallier, go get the Ophir box 
and give Noble the stock." 

Cavallier rushed to the safe and brought out a big tin 
box containing Baldwin's Ophir. The latter thrust his 
hand into the box and drew out a big batch of the stock 
which he gave to Noble, saying. — 

"No time to count this. Hurry back to the boardroom 
and, if Keene repeats his bid, sell him the 10,000 shares. _ 

Returned to the boardroom. Noble found continued wild 
excitement in the market, but Keene had ceased bidding for 
Ophir. Loveland reported that after Noble had so hurriedly 
left the room, Keene had repeated his 10,000-share bid 
several times and then became silent and went, to his seat, 
fanning himself and all the time keeping a good watch on 
the door. Noble, who missed making a large commission, 
believes to this day, that Keene, (who was well named), 
must have seen him when he rushed to the door and di- 
vined where he was going, and for what purpose. Jim 
Keene's instinct in stock matters was uncanny. Hardly an 
important order came into the market that he did not im- 
mediately fathom out what it was and who it was for and, 
when he was satisfied that he was right, there was no stop- 
ping him, in his operations. It is no wonder, that a man 
whose mind seemed especially created for the stock game, 
should have made many millions in the market. 

H. H. Noble, who recently reached his 80th year, is per- 
haps the youngest looking old man in San Francisco and 
this is undoubtedly due to his optimism and cheerfulness, 
under all conditions, whether it be the failure to secure a 
big commission, or managing one of the most beautifully 
adorned cemeteries in the world. 

Keene's bid for 10.000 shares of Ophir, was a bluff, made 
to help create a general boom in the market, under cover 



of which, he was unloading certain stocks through other 
brokers. 

"Johnny" Skae's Big Assessment 

Meeting William McPherson, once secretary of the Sierra 
Nevada Mining Company, the other day, the former said 
to the writer. — "Don't forget to record among your bits of 
Unwritten History, that the largest single amount ever paid 
on a mining stock assessment, was in our old office. 

The amount spoken of by McPherson, was $99,000. on 
an assessment of $3 a share, levied by the old Sierra Nevada 
Mining Company in the late 70s. This was paid by a check 
of Glazier & Co., and was for all the Sierra Nevada stock 
held for customers in their office at the time. Most of this 
stock was being carried on margin for "Johnny" Skae, 
president of the Sierra Nevada Mining Company. When 
the price had risen from $1.55 to $270.00 a share, he was 
still buying, or "pyramiding," as the stock professionals 
call it, believing that the rich body of ore would expand. 
But the ore became low grade and the stock fell below 
$100.00 and Skae's brokers sold him out. A short time be- 
fore the break came, Skae gave his famous fish fry dinner, 
to which all persons on the Comstock and in the neighbor- 
ing counties were invited. The spread was given in the little 
hollow where the Mexican mill now stands and among 
many other things, several thousand trout and two carloads 
>f champagne was served to the multitude. 

"Where Ignorance Is Bliss" 

The public at large is better educated in stock matters 
nowadays than in the old times, but, for all that, veterans 
at the game say that it was easier to make money then than 
now. In years gone by, one heard and saw many queer 
things, while standing for half an hour in a broker's office. 
For example, in Ed. Cahill's office one day a womin went 
to the counter and said to Jim Cahill. — 

"I want to buy 50 Best and Belcher to go down. 1 ' 

"Why do you want to make a loss after you have bought 
it:" asked Cahill and, after a little reflection, he said. — 
"Oh! I see. You want to short Best and Belcher. In that 
case, you must sell it. not buy." "Yes, that's it," replied 
the woman. 

Another customer, named Einstein, said to Cahill, "Vould 
you advise me to buy some sabbage?" (otherwise pro- 
nounced Savage). 

"No," said Cahill. "I advise you to buy some cabbage." 

Another day. when the writer was present, a well known 
priest entered Cahill's office, wrote an order and handed 
it to Jim. After the priest departed, the writer said — "I 
don't want to pry into your business, Jim, but please tell 
me what that order was for." 

"It was to buy some Ophir." (which sold that day for 
ss to $10). 

Three days later. Ophir sold up to $19, 



Bill Smith, returning from work much earlier than usual, 
noticed his wife cleaning the outside windows. 

Thinking to give her a pleasant surprise, he crept up be- 
hind her and kissed her. Without turning around she mur- 
mured sweetly, "One pint, please." 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacture™ of 
RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS. CULVERTS, FLUMES, 

I'E.NSTOCIvS, GASHOLDERS, SMOKE STACKS, ETC. 
San Frnnclttco, Calif. Lok Angeles, Calif. 

444 Market St. 5717 Santa I'e Avenue 



GANTNER & MAISON 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel— 771 to 777 Valencia Street. Bet. 18th and 19th Sts., 
San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



January 10, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



1«J 



TownMLCrier 




who thedevilwt thou. 

"ONE TH/tT WILL PLAY THC 
pEWL,Sltt WITH YOU" 

Shakspeare* 



THERE will be much disappoint- 
ment that the President has not 
seen fit to appoint a Californian to the 
United States Supreme Court upon the 
resignation of Justice Joseph Mc- 
Kenna. This state has for many years 
had its representative at Washington 
on the Supreme Bench and in the per- 
son of Justice Stephen I. Field con- 
tributed a great deal to the distinction 
of that body. Other times, other ways, 
The West does not seem to find any 
great favor nowadays at the White 
House. 

* * * 

— Judge Partridge is certain that the 
Quadra was legally seized. That is 
to say he assumes that the statement 
of the government people that it was 
within an hour of the shore is correct. 
On the other hand, the Quadra peo- 
ple maintain that they can prove that 
they were more than seventeen miles 
from the nearest American land. Of 
course the decision at present goes 
merely to preliminary matter and does 
not touch the main controversy. 

* * * 

— From the County Bench of Ala- 
meda County to a federal judgeship in 
less than five years, is going quite fast, 
but that appears to be what Judge A. 
F. St. Sure is reported to have ac- 
complished. They say that he is slated 
for the place left vacant by the late 
Maurice J. Dooling, a great jurist and 
a fine man. We congratulate the new 
judge. 

— It is a queer thing how large the 
law looms in this republic of ours and 
in this city of ours, also. In this 
week's issue we have several items 
dealing with the bench and bar. and 
yet their importance necessitates the 
notes. A cynic might remark that for 
all the apparent recognition of the majes- 
ty of the law. there is little real recogni- 
tion, and he would be too nearly right to 

he agreeable. 

* * * 

— What with cross word puzzles and 
limerick contests and the like, the San 
Francisco evening papers are becom- 
ing wastes and wildernesses through 
which it is practically impossible to 
trace the hiding news to it-- lair, and 
when found — but there! One would 
think that we had enough ability in 
the ci'y to produce a newspaper instead 
of a conglomerate. 

» * * 

— We have all been perplexed as to 
the action of Police Captain Goff with 



respect to his proposed appointment 
as head of the prohibition forces of the 
State of California. First he would, 
and then he wouldn't, such coyness is 
seldom seen off the comic opera stage 
and we are still left guessing, though 
the report that the appointment has 
been actually mailed from Washing- 
ton, looks suspiciously certain. Goff 
is a nice man, but he is going to take 
up a horrible job, with failure a fore- 
gone conclusion. 



— Now the prohis are going to sweep 
the rum runners from the sea by a spe- 
cially armed body of coast vessels in 
the hands of the Coast Guard Service. 
This last body of men, by the way 
have been a great asset since their for- 
mation, which was before we had a 
regular navy. One of their vessels, 
the "Tampa," escorted three hundred 
and fifty ships through the war zone 
and only lost two. She was finally torpe- 
doed by a German submarine. Every last 
one of her hundred and fifteen men 
went down with her and the British 
Admiralty formally expressed its ad- 
miration of the heroism of the crew. 
To set such men to work chasing rum 
runners i* little short of ludicrous. 



— There is a high school started at 
San Quentin, in the jail. This is a new 
departure and is supposed to be a 
great advance. Well, it may be. but 
really, it" is hard to say. For example, 
the professors are convicts, and thev 
say that the new high school in the 
penitentiary will have a staff which as 
far as academic standing goes, is better 
equipped than any high school in the 
state. What i^ the use of academic 
training if it can't keep you out of 
jail? A class of crooks being educated 
by a crook who is also a scholar, should 

make the education enthusiasts pause 

a bit. 




TAILOR AND IMPORTER 
Latest Styles and Materials 

Moderately Priced 

527 Post St., opp. Olympic Club 

San Francisco, Cal. 




N. W. CORNER 



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COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
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process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 
SAN FRANCISCO 



~)ach cor ojberafed^t^ 
by reliable 
chauffeurs 
u/Ao //toroucfr/y under- 
stand their Lus/ftess 



This means that you 
can dispense with all 
worries as to personal 
security when usinp 
our cars. Our drivers 
are careful and they 
never violate your de- 
sires for safety. 




I'b.inr Frnnklli. 217 
1629 Pinr Sirrel 
San FnnrUro 



^iP 8 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 10, 1925 



FINANCIAL 

(Continued from Page 10) 

— The oil situation is the subject of many letters, personal 
as well as institutional. You have to remember that there 
are conflicting interests. Some want to keep the price of 
the product low, others will do their best to keep production 
down and get the price up. I am disposed to think that the 
former are winning at present, but the big men will have 
their way before many months are past. Therefore, I would 
advocate friendly relations with both Codlin and Short. 
Buy a little on every reaction, but reserve a good half of 
your resources for the big ones — which you will see surely. 



— And stick to the strong companies. Pacific oil is the 
best for the long pull. When the big interests get their way, 
you will see high prices for your gas — the bit of oil that 
interests you most probably — and you will understand 
what a powerful all}' Pacific Oil has in Dame Nature. 



— Welcome, little stranger, "The Redwood Reforester," 
born in Eureka. Mighty trees from little acorns grow, as 
mother used to say. This title explains; all should join 
in the campaign for the preservation of our wonderful 
giants. Big nurseries are in active operation, more can be 
done if we get together. Write to the editor at Eureka 
for particulars of the Redwood Reforestation Association. 
If he sees this, will he tell me more about those canvas 
frames? My little lovers' delight of a garden found Jack 
Frost an undesirable bedfellow recently. 

* * * 

— Heller, Bruce & Co. offer a varied list of conservative 
investments, suited to the man or woman who places 
security above everything and is wise enough to know that 
he does not know. Among the municipals my present 
favorite is Los Angeles High School District 5s, sold to 
yield about 4.65 per cent. From the Public Utilities 
offered, I select Southern California Gas Co. first and re- 
funding mortgage 5j.^s, sold to yield just under 5.80 per 
cent. Pennsylvania R. R. Co 5s, yielding about 5.08 per 
cent is a sound "Miscellaneous." Maybe, Mr. Heller has 
more up his sleeve, but all his cards are trumps. 

* * * 

— We surely are feeling proud to see the quotations of 
our Stock and Bond Exchange in "The Wall Street jour- 
nal" and other Eastern papers. It is difficult to see how 
any American paper can pretend to give a full quotation 
service without including those of the leading exchange of 
the Pacific Coast. It is, however, never toolate to mend. 




lEtfRD IT? 



The new domestic help was stating the terms on which 
she would accept the situation. 

"I want sixty pounds a year," she said, "and I don't wash 
floors, or clean boots, or " 

"But " protested the mistress, feebly. 

"Work after six o'clock," went on the woman, steadily. 
"And I want every evening off in the week and a fine ref- 
erence, and " 

"But surely the reference can wait till you leave us?" 
broke in the mistress, hurriedly. 

"No, I want the letter now," replied the new domestic, 
firmly. "I've tried getting them when I leave, and I've never 
got a good one yet." 

* * * 

The young man was being instructed in his duties as 
usher at a wedding. 

"You understand," said the best man; "When the people 
arrive you ask them if they're friends of the bride or of the 
groom. You show the bride's friends to seats on one side 
of the church and the groom's to seats on the other." 

"Lot of fuss!" said the usher. "Won't they take sides 
soon enough?" 

* * * 

"\\ ell, Jimmy, did you enjoy your visit to the museum?" 

"Yes, mamma." 

"Do you remember any of the nice things you saw?" 

"Oh, yes, I remember lots of them." 

"What were they called?" 

"Well, most of them were called 'Do not touch.' " 



A tourist with his bride asked a driver if there was any- 
thing remarkable about the mountain they were ascending, 
and he answered: "No, nothing peculiar about the hill 
itself, but there is a queer story connected with it." 

"Please give us the legend." 

"Well, once upon a time a young lady and gentleman 
went up this mountain together. Hundreds of people saw 
them go higher and higher until they disappeared, and they 
never came back." 

"What became of them?" 

"They went down on the other side." 



— Mr. J. R. Mason thinks that San Francisco is not doing 
its duty to the "back country." Maybe, he is right, and 
we have been too much occupied counting our bits of 
paper, to realize where they come from. Or is it that Mr. 
Mason is expecting too much of less seriously minded per- 
sons than himself? The true lover is apt to' eye with un- 
kind eyes those who wear smooth the paths of dalliance, and 
wh.en Mason chants "I love thee, California," he tempts one 
to ask why he says it; it is so obvious to all the world, in 
all he does. 

* * * 

— For some reason, no real reason, a prejudice exists in 
the minds of many against unlisted securities. Yet the 
list contains many of the soundest bargains in the market. 
As you may find out for yourself by sending a postal to 
Martin Judge, Jr. & Co., American Bank Building, for the 
list the firm publishes. There are all kinds of explanations 
for not listing — as there are for my not devoting my time 
to theological discourses. Better, in both cases, for the 
stockholder. 



"How much bread do you sell a day?" the customer 
asked. 

"Some four hundred pounds on the average," replied the 
baker. 

"I can tell you how to sell five hundred pounds," said 
the customer. 

"Can you?" said the baker, eagerly. 

"Yes; give full weight," said the customer. 



Young Newrich had spent twelve months abroad, and 
on his return was greeted warmly by his father, accom- 
panied by guests. 

"Well, Charlie, old boy, enjoyed yerself ?" cried old New- 
rich, joyously. "And how you've growed." 

"Grown, father, grown," corrected his son, annoyed at 
the suppressed chuckles. 

"Well, I'm blessed," replied the old man, in a surprised 
tone. "Rum notions you pick up abroad. What have I to 
groan for?" 



January 10, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



21 



Qasa de r^hCanana 

La Jolla, Cal. 

Saw Diego County 



Southern California's new season 
hotel, located directly on the 
ocean shore on Coast Boulevard. 
100 rooms, 100 baths. Built in the 
Spanish Renaissance style. Has 
all of the up-to-date comforts of 
the modern hotels of today. Only 
strictly fresh products used on 
our table. Cuisine American. 
Rates from $8.00 per day and up- 
ward, American plan. Special 
weekly and monthly rates. Write 
for illustrated folder to 

CASA DE MANANA 
La Jolla, Calif. 



The January rllK J ALL at Gassner's 

GASSNER STANDARDS very definitely estab- 
lish the exceptional importance of this occasion. 
All the Gassner Furs included — all the fur 
coats, all the fur wraps, all the fur jacquettes, all the 
fur neckpieces. 

Reductions to 50% 

LOUIS GASSNER 

Incorporated 
112-114 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

"The new store that is 32 years old" 



KING AMBULANCE CO. 

Physicians' and Surgeons' Exchange 
Nurses' Registry 

2570 Bush Street, San Francisco 

Telephone West 1400 



12 









"a 



One Hundred and Fourteenth Half Yearly Report 

THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

( LATELY THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY) 

SAVINGS COMMCRCIA.U 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
Che Assets of which have never been Increased by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 



31 



Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 CALIFORNIA STR EET, SAN FRA NCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

DECEMBER 31st, 1924 

Assets — 

United States Bonds and Notes, State, Municipal and Other Bonds and 

Securities (total value $26,500,851.63), standing on books at $24,248,711. 

Loans on Real Estate, secured by tirst mortgages 62,573,112. 

Loans on Bonds and Stocks and other Securities _ 1,084,312. 

Bank Buildings and Lots, main and branch offices (value $1,700,100.00) 

-binding on books at 1 

Other Real Estate (value J8>,000.00\ standing on books at 1 

Employees' Pension Fund (value $461,746.52) standing on books at 1 

Cash on hand and checks on Federal Reserve and other Banks 9,011,031 



S3 

57 

23 

no 
no 
«o 

36 



Total $96,917,170.69 

Liabilities — 

Due Depositors $92,917,170.69 

Capital Stock actually paid up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,005, OCC.OO 

Total $96,917,170.69 

GEO. TOURNY, President A. H. MULLER, Secretary. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 31st day of December, 1924. 

SEAL CHAS. F. DUISENBERG, Notary Public. 



A Dividend to Depositors of FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4H) per cent per 
annum was declared, Interest COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED 

QUARTERLY, 

AND WHICH MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 
Deposits made on or before January 10th. 1925, will earn interest from January 1st, 1925. 



?5 

tx J 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 10, 1925 




jvgerp* 



(Swell* 



NAHONA1 CREST 




onee 

-the better it gets- 




«EO. W. CASWELL 



Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 



1 ,800,000 cups were served at the Pan- 
ama Pacific International Exposition 



DUCO 

LACQUER 
Everluster Auto Enameling Co. 

BEAUTY AND DURABILITY 

Not affected by exposure. We guar- 
antee every one of our jobs. 

Phone Franklin 2775 
946 Bush Street San Francisco 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from Page 7) 

Henry Duffy will be seen in the star 
role, a part created for him by the 
author. It is that of a young society man 
who becomes intoxicated by the night 
life of Paris and imbibes a bit too freely 
on one occasion. It happens that he 
lingers too long on the dock at Bordeaux 
and is carried away on a steamer bound 
for New York and home. On the vessel 
are several engaged couples and some 
newly-married ones, and the inebriated 
one gets tangled up in the affairs of two 
of them with resulting ludicrous compli- 
cations. The mirth is of the most delicate 
sort and the entire action occurs on the 
steamer, which by the way, is a real boat 
solidly constructed and the pride of the 
Alcazar mechanical forces. 



Maynard Dixon opens on the 15th of 
this month with a two weeks' one-man 
showing of his recent work, which will 
be new to the public of San Francisco. 
Invitations to the opening are being sent. 



Cameo 

"Let Women Alone." the feature pho- 
toplay at the Cameo this week, is the 
screen adaptation of Viola Brothers 
Shore's magazine story, "On the Shelf." 
and was produced by Frank Wood at the 
Peninsula Studios at San Mateo. Many 
scenes in and around San Francisco are 
shown in the picture. Pat O'Malley and 
Wanda Hawley have the leading roles, 
while Ethel Wales appears as the mother. 
Wallace Beery has one of the most en- 
joyable characterizations in "Let Women 
Alone." appearing as the unique captain 
of a tugboat. The musical portion of the 
performance is also rather elaborate this 
week. Walter Allen and the Cameo 
Melodists with Miss Gladys W. Salis- 
bury, organist, present an excellent con- 
cert, while Frank McBride, tenor, is one 
of the principals of the musical program. 



Club Beaux Arts 

The mid-winter lecture series of the 
Club Beaux Arts opened on Tuesday 
afternoon, the 6th, with a lecture by 
Prof. Eugene Neuhaus, "A Century of 
Painting." Dr. Phyllis Ackerman's lec- 
ture will be given at a later date, as her 
eastern lecture tour has been extended. 

Professor Neuhaus traced the influence 
of the Barbazin or Romantic School of 
Painting in France and Europe to this 
country, from Corot and Rousseau to 
George Innis and on to our own William 
Keith. He showed that it was because 
this school sunk in a silly sentimentality 
at the last that caused the rise of the new 
schools of painting, the realists, the im- 
pressionists, the cubists. To these schools 
we owe the renewed vigor in painting, 
the freshness in color, etc. Professor 
Neuhaus emphasized the fact that art 
cannot stand still, that if we wait for it 
to setie back into a traditional past or a 
peaceful present to give it our support 
we still have to wait until there is no art 
at all. He spoke of several of the 
canvases hanging in the Club Gallery and 
showed why they stood for the best in 
the art of our time. 













Tel. Prospert 6979 






GARAGE 




639 Turk Street 
San Francisco, Calif. 




The above firm means lots to the auto- 
mobile owners. For a small monthly 
payment they take all your automo- 
bile worries away from you. Your car 
is kept in first-class mechanical condi- 
tion. It's greased and oiled. It's towed 
in San Francisco free of charge. Re- 
placement of parts up to $50 free, in 
case of damage by collision. 10 per 
cent discount on oils and greases and 
gasoline. Automobiles washed for 
$1.50. And other features. 

Investigate, or phone tor 
representative 


1 




Em. PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete eat isf ac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or sta- 



^B^K^FTL^. .^Hfe. |> 1 1 m 1 h r or pia- 

-lm-JWiHHilMmT yl°u n s e a' m p?es 9hOW 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
41 First Street, San Francisco 



Mail Advertising 
Specialists 

ACCURATE AND PROMPT 
SERVICE 

Andrews-Breeding Company 

Sutter 6224 

Room 801 Gdlette Building 

830 MARKET STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



OVER HALF A MILLION DEPOSITORS 

CONDENSED STATEMENT OF CONDITION 

Bank of Italy 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL TRUST 

Head Office (San Francisco) and Branches 

DECEMBER 29, 1924 

RESOURCES 
First Mortgage Loans on Real 

Estate $123,553,441.32 

Other Loans and Discounts 80,918,996 29 $204,472,437.61 



United States, State. County and 
Municipal Bonds and United 
States Certificates of Indebted- 
ness 86,436,435 40 

Other Bonds and Securities 9,377,819 12 

Stock in Federal Reserve Bank.. 675,000.00 



TOTAL U. S. AND OTHER SE- 
CURITIES 

Due from Federal Reserve Bank 
Cash and Due from Other Banks 



16,778,739 6S 
27,524,515.57 



TOTAL CASH AND DUE FROM 

BANKS 

Banking Premises, Furniture, Fixtures and 

Safe Deposit Vaults (Eighty-seven Banking 

Offices in Fifty-eight California cities) 

Other Real Estate Owned 

Customers' Liability Under Letters of Credit 

and Acceptances 

Interest Earned — Uncollected 

Employes' Pension Fund (actual value $164,- 

590.33) standing on the Books at 

Other Resources 



96.489.254.52 



44.303,255.25 



8,652,473.37 
978,737.00 

957,494,95 
2,782,882.85 

100 
19,765.22 



TOTAL RESOURCES $358,656,301.' 



DEPOSITS- 



LIABILITIES 

-Savings $233,372,237.08 

Commercial 95,591.681.97 $328,963,919.05 



Dividends Unpaid 

Discount Collected but Not Earned 

Letters of Credit. Acceptances and Time 
Drafts 



CAPITAL PAID IN 

SURPLUS 

UNDIVIDED PROFITS 

Interest Earned but Not Collected.. 



619.79S 40 
53,511.48 



957,494.05 



$330, 594, 723. 8S 

..$ 17,500 000.00 
.. 5,000,000.00 
.. 2,778,695.04 

2 7S2.8S2.85 



TOTAL LIABILITIES $3r>S.K56 301.77 

All charge-offs, expenses and interest payable to end of half- 
year have been deducted in above statement. 

CONDENSED STATEMENT OF CONDITION— STOCK- 
HOLDERS AUXILIARY CORPORATION 
(The Capital Stock of this Corporation is owned share for 
share by the stockholders of the Bank of Italy) 
December 29, 1924 
Resources 

Investment in Slocks. Bonds and Real Estate ..$6,817, 309.37 

Hills and Accounts Receivable 2,697.548.96 

Cash on Hand and in Banks 22,848".91 



TOTAL RESOURCES $9. :,;:7. 707.21 

Liabilities 
Hills and Accounts Payable * 882,768.9-1 

CAPITAL, 9UKPL1 9 AND UNDIVIDED 

PROFITS 8.914.! 



TOTAL LIABILITIES -..$9,587,707.24 

COMBINED CAPITAL, SURFLUS AND 

PROFITS OF BOTH CORPORATIONS $36,976.526 22 

(Including interest earned by Bank of Italy but not collected) 

NUMBER OF DEPOSITORS. 550.097 

Savings Deposits made to and including January 10, 1925, 

will earn interest from January 1, 1925. 



The Mission 
of 

Our 1925 
Advertising 

To assist your enjoyment 

and further appreciation 

of our service. 

To convey to the public the neces- 
sity and desirability of our service. 
To indicate the greater enjoyment 
you will find in life through the use 
of gas and electricity when utilized 
through modern appliances. 

And to ask, if we may, that you 
assist us in making 



Pacific Service a 
Popular Service 



«e 



"PACIFIC SERVICE" 




HERE'S WHAT I WISH 



Wishing and getting and 
wishing again — that's a lot 
better than Latin or Greek. 

When my dad was a kid 
and my mother his girl, he 
wished on every white horse 
and hay wagon that passed. 

Some day in June when 
Caesar has all Gaul divided 
into three parts and the 
only Euclid that I care any- 
thing about is the main 



street of Cleveland- 
a Playboy. 



-I want 



If wishing got dad what 
he wanted, I'll have the 
Playboy, and I just have an 
idea that when school is 
over and the dandelions are 
dandelioning, it would 
please dad a lot to see me 
driving the Playboy. 

Because that's the kind of 
a dad I have. 



CHASE-MORRILL COMPANY 



Motur ( ars 
Van Ness ami Sutter 



San Francisco 



i'~±* 




J O R 



A tryttat thten on ths sunlit snow — 
wh, re the xv or Id lea vet off and ioy 
begins — skimming the wan whit* 
matte — a thrilling jou rnry for ont p.r- 
f,u nom.nt through the stinting air, 
lit,- tht lain* of youth— the wind's own 
children — huffy — exhilarated — tar. free 
— alive. That's Lake Placid in January. 



1\1 



AT 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



California Advertiser 



$5.00 PER YEAR 



kTURDAY, JANUARY 17, 1925 




OS ANGELEJ 




Looking due south, from the iiwi of Telegraph Hill, U down-toiin San Francisco. 
From this viewpoint one sees tht Insurance and Financial District. 




before You ffluild 
visits- 

Sharon Building 

Exhibit of 
Building Material 




DECORATIVE LIGHTING FITMENTS 

The standard of fine residential lighting 

PERFECLITES 



The standard of efficiency i\t commercial lighting 

PARCELLS-ARNEST 
COMPANY 

Authorised Dealers 

Complete Lines of Electric Lighting Fixtures 
for Immediate Installation 

55 New Montgomery Street Phone Garfield 4980 

SAN FRANCISCO 



You are invited to call at our show rooms in the Sharon 
Building (Exhibit of Building Materials) to inspect these 
fine fixtures. 



Golden Gate Ferry Company 


FOOT OF HYDE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 


WINTER SCHEDULE 


TIME TABLE 


EFFECTIVE OCTOBER 15, 1924 


Leave Sausalito 


Leave San Francisco 


A.M. P.M. 


(Hyde Street) 


6:00 12:30 


A.M. P.M. 


6:30 1:00 


6:30 12:30 


7.00 1:30 


7:00 1:00 


7:30 2:00 


7:30 1:30 


8:00 3:00 


8:00 2:00 


8:30 4:00 


8:30 2:30 


9:00 4:30 


9:00 3:30 


9:30 5:00 


9:30 4:30 


10:00 5:30 


10:00 5:00 


10:30 6:00 


10:30 5:30 


11:00 6:30 


11:00 6:00 


11:30 7:00 


11:30 6:30 


12:00 7:30 


12:00 7:00 


8:0( 


7:30 


8:30 


8:00 


9:00 


8:30 


9:30 


9:00 


10:30 


9:30 


11:30 


10:00 




11:00 




12:00 


Special Service When Traffic Requirements 


Make Necessary. 


Golden Gate Ferry Company 

. 




TOPS 

SEAT COVERS 

ENCLOSURES 

UPHOLSTERING 

BODY BUILDING 

REPAIRING 



.«#• 



American Auto Painting Co. 

Incorporated 

Van Ness Avenue at Eddv Street 
Wm. B.Gibson, Mgr. Prospect 4296 



*&r 



■*&» 



.:■":.. 





EiUblUhcd July 20, 15*6 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1S56, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

Jr., from 1SS4 to 1925. Is now printed and published by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 235 Montgomery St., San Francisco, California. Telephone 

Douglas 6S53. Entered at San Francisco, California, Post Office as second-class matter. London Office: Stieet & Co., 30 CornhiU, E. C. London, 

England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one yenr. $5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 



Vol. CVI 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JANUARY 17, 1925 



No. 3 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER January 17, 1925 



S 



PIONEER PUBLISHER PASSES ON 

NTERWOVEN with the business life of the Pacific Coast, more particularly 
with San Francisco, was the life and work of Frederick Marriott, who for 
over forty years published and edited the San Francisco News Letter, a journal 
of general circulation, devoted to finance, society, politics and vital questions 
of the day. Mr. Marriott passed away last Sunday morning at his home, after 
a long period of illness. 

His keen insight into the different phases of the commercial and financial world 
of our city, where his publication has always wielded no little influence, gave 
him an unusual opportunity to make his grasp of the knowledge of the exis- 
tence of its citizens an unusually efficient one, and aided him in directing his 
staff of writers as to what the public wanted and appreciated. 

This periodical has always made special editions its active work, and no other 
publication on the Coast has brought out such artistic and splendidly printed 
editions, whxh have always been met with a cordial reception by the people, not 
only at home, but all over the world. 

Mr. Marriott, like his father, who was the founder of the Illustrated London 
News, and the News Letter, which he established in 1856, may be said to have 
been a continuous business success. 

Mr. Marriott was proprietor of the Overland Monthly for several years, but 
sold this magazine to give all his attention and care to the News Letter. 

He has been called a shrewdly cautious business man, but socially was known 
to have many kind impulses, which he indulged himself in to the satisfaction 
of many. 

A pretty story is told wh : ch proved how closely associated Mr. Marriott 
always was with his writers. At the tme of the big fire in San Francisco h : s 
editorial rooms and printing establishment, then located in the old Halleck 
block, were burned. He arrived on the scene early in the morning, before 
the general fire had reached the place, but at a time when destruction threat- 
ened and the firemen were at work dynamiting parts of the building. He 
entered the building, which was badly wrecked, and carried out a large bundle 
of manuscripts. One of h : s office staff asked h'm why he should risk h's life 
to save manuscripts of writers who surely would not hold him responsible for 
the loss by fire. Mr. Marriott replied that no matter how valudess a manu- 
script might appear, that the writers themselves looked upon their work as 
their children, and that he would continue to risk his life and try and save all 
of the papers. 

Mr. Marriott was a lover of animals, and this was shown in his affection for 
dogs and horses. He was at one t'me an amateur ra : ser of pedigreed dogs. 
He loved the great out of doors as only a Californian can, and was quite a 
traveler. For his age he was one of the youngest and most energet'c of men, 
until only a few months before his death. At the age of seventy, he looked 
but fifty years of age. 

Besides his widow, Mrs. Fredericka Marriott, two sisters, Miss Adele Marriott 
and Mrs. John Partridge, he leaves two daughters, Mrs. Ida Bacon and Miss 
Desiree Marriott, and two sons, F. A. and E. R. Marriott, who will carry on 
the business. 



January 17, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




Both the houses at Sacra- 
The Child Labor Amendment mento passed the amend- 
ment to the federal consti- 
tution, giving the federal government the power and con- 
trol over all children in the country under eighteen years 
of age by overwhelming majorities. The Assembly voted 
68 to 10 for the amendment and the Senate 36 to 3 the same 
way. In fact there have been no measures of this impor- 
tance in the history of the Legislature so completely sup- 
ported. The legislation strikes at the very fundamental idea 
of our government and confiscates from the individual state 
a very important part of the power which is necessarily and 
fittingly its own. If the federal government is able by 
means of constitutional amendments to encroach upon the 
power of the state to control its own liquor laws and again 
on the power of the state to make its own legislation with 
respect to the labor of the children of its own citizens, there 
is going to be very little power left to the individual state 
and the notion that we are a federation of self governing 
communities known as states will have to be abandoned. 
This has nothing to do with the labor of children as such. 
We yield to no one in our anxiety for the welfare of the 
children and we willingly support any measure looking to 
that well being. But we must respectfully differ from the 
contentions of those whose object appears to be the building 
up of a federal bureau which will dominate the lives of 
citizens in their domestic relations. Our conditions of 
child labor are beyond any question good. There is no- 
where in the world where childhood is more sympathetically 
and carefully guarded. It is true that there are parts of the 
country where the conditions are not so good. But it is 
much safer to leave those conditions to the awakening in- 
telligence. . 

The Governor gave us an ex- 
The Harbor Commission ceptionally long statement this 

year. It cannot be said how- 
ever that it was not interesting, on the contrary it was in 
many ways an unusually valuable document. It may be 
frankly said, however, to have been somewhat marred by 
the introduction of the personal element and a note of 
belligerency, which is not in accord with the best messages 
of executive chiefs. 

But among all the statements in a very long message we 
look with the greatest pleasure upon the references to the 
State Harbor Commission. It is time that the real value of 
this very fine body of men was more completely recognized. 
The Governor is to be congratulated upon his public 
acknowledgment of the value of its services, some of which 
are so marked as to deserve repetition at our hands. 

After praising the record of the Board for economy and 
efficiency, he goes on as follows: 

"Other improvements made by the board to encourage 
activity on the waterfront and assist the shipping industry 
are the opening and successful operation of a grain ter- 
minal, repaving the Embarcadero with smooth surfacing. 
reconstruction of the Belt Line Railroad, extending and 
covering piers, repairing ferry slips and making room for 
more ships in the southern extension of the harbor, build- 
ing new Pier No. 50. one of the three planned; reclamation 
of a large area of submerged lands along Islais creek for 
commercial uses, and carrying forward a general plan to 
reclaim 280 acres of waterfront owned by the state. Mean- 
time the well-organized forces of the commission have been 
giving good service to the shipping public, winning gen- 
eral praise for splendid business management and for the 
encouragement of commerce. 



The case of the Quadra with its 
The Case of the Quadra cargo of rum is likely to be one 

of the great historical cases and 
in time to come the students of law and in ernational affairs 
may easily come to regard it as one of the pivotal cases in 
international affairs. Not that the Quadra itself ma'.ters much 
now. The fate of that ship will have to depend upon the 
credibility of the witnesses as to the position of the ship with 
reference to the limit imposed by the treaty between Britain 
and the United States. But the principle involved in the de- 
cision on a collateral matter by the District Court here, is the 
bone of contention. Our District Judge says : "It is the merest 
sophistry to say that when a foreign ship has a cargo of liquor 
in her hold on the high seas she is doing no more than she has 
a right to do." On the other hand, Feileral Judge James M. 
Morton, Jr., of the district of Massachusetts says: "That a 
vessel carrying liquor is not 'amenable to seizure as long as 
she keeps to the high seas, except as provided by the trea y.' " 
There is a very distinct difference of opinion here in two fed- 
eral courts as to the law in such cases. Our local court evi- 
dently holds, at least for the present, that a coast guard can 
stop any ship on the high seas and take her in if they think 
that she has liquor on board. If she has liquor, then, that fact 
places her in the wrong whether she is on the high seas and 
more than an hour from the coast or not. The Massachusetts 
judge takes the point of view that we have no jurisdiction 
on the high seas and that we have no more right to take a 
ship outside of the limits fixed by treaty just because she is 
carrying liquor, than if she were carrying a cargo of canned 
apricots. There is a wide difference here which will have to be 
determined by the highest court and may take a long time. We 
can very well imagine that if the opinion of our district court 
is upheld, that there will be international conferences. 



The statement of Chairman Toy of 
The Peninsula Road the State Highway Commission that 

funds will be at hand to develop the 
Peninsula Highway will be received with great satisfac- 
tion. The "bottleneck" is the only means of getting into 
and out of San Francisco, without crossing a ferry, and 
the congestion on the present highway is admittedly a 
severe handicap to the city itself. The funds are derived 
from the operation of the gasoline tax and will be sufficient 
to allow of the important part of the work being completed 
during the current year. The most dangerous section of 
the road is between San Bruno and Daly City. With that 
part the beginning will be made, according to Mr. Toy. 
The widening will begin at San Bruno and will go north- 
ward to the San Francisco county line, a distance of about 
seven and a half miles, as rapidly as the rights of way are 
acquired. The character of the widening will be the same 
as that between San Bruno and Beresford which cost $140,- 
000 for about five and three quarters miles. There will be 
a roadway with a clear width of fifty feet and a thirty foot 
pavement between Redwood City and the Southern boun- 
dary ..f San Mateo County. This is about three and a half 
miles and cost $130,000. From the above it can readily be 
seen that, as soon as the proposed extension and widening 
of the highway is completed, we shall have one road, at 
least, capable of handling the enormous amount of traffic 
and which affords the automobiling public a safer and more 
commodious means of arrival and departure from our city. 
For all of this later improvement of the traffic facilities of 
San Francisco, we have to thank the untiring energy and 
abounding talent of Mr. Toy. Never was a communitv 
better served than by this citizen, who combines with a 
discreet financial perception of the economics of the situa- 
tion, an energy and engineering enterprise which few pub- 
lic officials in the world possess. The achievements of such 
men restore our faith in the democratic form of government 
and give us renewed confidence in the possibility of first- 
class work. 

(Continued on Page 16) 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 17, 1925 






By Antoinette Arnold 



The Cavalier and His Bid 

Of all the invitations femininity is heiress to, none is so 
individually nattering as a bid to an exclusive Men's Club. 

Courtesies extended by cavaliers to the opera, the theatre, 
to banquets, dinners, dances, motor jaunts, in no way com- 
pare in significance to an engraved invitation bearing the 
insignia of "his" club. 

He who extends such attentive consideration leaps sky- 
ward in "her" applause and estimation. He has paid her a 
convincing compliment and she esteems it so. Wife, who 
is the recipient of the coveted cards, heartily responds, 
proud and happy with anticipation. 

Immediately she begins to plan what to wear. She wants 
to look her best and all her wiles are commandeered for the 
important event. 

The greatest compliment, the highest social tribute in 
this respect ever accorded the fairer sex, young, old, or at 
the guessing age, was that incomparable time when we were 
invited to the world renowned Bohemian Grove. 

It happened just once, in all the history of those mag- 
nificent Bohemian annuals. 

Men travel fiom various parts of the world to be present 
at these classical events. Members of the Bohemian Club, 
study, rehearse, prepare with skill, and arrange their busi- 
ness enterprises, according to the schedule of the historical 
jinks. They are presented in a glorious redwood grove, 
near where the Russian River flows. 

Dignitaries, men of letters, financiers, composers, authors, 
sculptors, artists of every land and clime, count it their 
privilege to assemble there. 

And to think that we, mere women-folks, were once in- 
vited as their selected guests ! 

Whatever we anticipated ; however high our expectations 
were ; how haughtily critical we intended to be — we were 
actually carried away on magic wings and given a glimpse 
of Paradise. Towering trees, flowering shrubs, songsters 
that skimmed across the vaulted skies — all Nature's gifts 
were seemingly accumulated and placed within the con- 
fines of the Grove. 

Glorious beyond the scope of words, was the Bohemian 
play. Text, music, drama, scenery, precept and purpose 
made eloquent appeal to aesthetic appreciation and vigor 
of mind. 

Kipling has written considerate things about the Bo- 
hemian Club in his famous American Notes. Julian Street, 
in his comments, Abroad at Home, has stated that San 
Francisco with her hills is partner with Rome ; with her 
harbor, Naples, she reflects ; with her hotels, she is New 
York; but with her clubs and her people, she is distinctively 
and alone, San Francisco, "which to my mind," said he, 
"comes nearest being the acme of praise." 

Liberal in their hospitalities are many men's clubs. 

The camaraderie of their organizations typifies the spirit 
of the West. Among these are the Union League Club, the 
Pacific Union Club, up on Nob Hill, the University Club ; 
the Commonwealth Club, the Transportation, the Con- 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

GSO Bunh Street, Between Powell and Stockton, San Frnnclnco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN. Proprietor 



cordia, the Argonaut, the Army and Navy clubs ; the bril- 
liant Press Club, and the generous-hearted gallants of the 
popular Olympic Club. 

We have danced, dined and marveled at the honors they 
have conferred, remembering, with acclaim, their unlimited 
generosities. 

Business clubs, fraternal organizations, too, with high 
entertainment and the worth-while instructions they give, 
command the feminine mind. Among them, the Rotary 
Club, the Kiwanis, the California Development League, the 
wonderful Advertising Club, the Knights of Columbus, the 
high and prominent Masonic orders, the Elks, the Electrical 
Organizations of Men and their fascinating gatherings. 

Co-recreational clubs, like co-educational clubs, have 
outstanding events when men have invited us. The Pre- 
sidio Golf Club, the California, the San Francisco and the 
Lake Merced Golf Clubs ; the different country clubs of 
fashionable personnel. The San Francisco Yacht Club, the 
Corinthians — how often have they, all, placed us in the row 
of pleasure's reckonings. 

"With her clubs and her people, she is SAN FRAN- 
CISCO," wrote the literary man. 

To feminine mind also comes something closely akin to 
the "acme of praise" in due and fitting commendation. 

But, one thing we should like to know. Will we, femi- 
nine folks, ever again be invited to the Bohemian Grove? 

I am just wondering! 



New Club Constructed Near Yosemite Valley 

A club, said to be unlike any other club in America, is in 
the course of construction in the midst of the high Sierra 
Mountains, within the proximity of the famous Yosemite 
Valley. It is located at the edge of the great National 
Park and less than three miles from the entrance to the 
Mariposa Grove of big trees. 

The foundation of the Yosemite Mountain Club is prog- 
ressing according to well known authorities. The road 
from Wawona is completed, as are several other roads 
leading to it. 

The club house will be at an altitude of over five thousand 
feet. It is planned to have the exterior rustic in appear- 
ance, while luxury and the most modern interior will be 
the plan. The building will be three stories high. In 
addition to the main building, the club plans a bachelors' 
lodge, chalet, a golf course, tennis courts, trapshooting 
ranges, a toboggan slide and other equipment for winter 
sports, as well. A lake with flowering lilies and high moun- 
tain blooms will be an added attraction. 

Membership includes men and women from all parts of 
the United States. Many will be enrolled from California. 
Walter Clark, of Los Angeles, is president of the Club. 
Dr. T. Edward Bailly, of San Francisco, is on the board 
of governors. 



HOTEL 


DEL 


MONTE 


Make Your Reservations at C 


ty Booking Office 


401 Crocker Bui 


ding 


Telephone Sutter 0130 


Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 
.4 



January 17, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Dinner at Bohemian Club 
Charles Caldwell Dobie, that brilliant young 
author of whom California is growing more 
and more proud, presided at a dinner given not 
long ago at the Bohemian Club in compliment 
to several famous novelists. Gertrude Ather- 
ton was one of them. 

Ruth Comfort Mitchell, in private life, Mrs. 
Sanborn Young, wife of Senator Young, who 
makes her home near the Los Gatos hills, was 
an honor guest. She has just finished another 
book, and gains prestige in the world of let- 
ters with each new publication. 
* * * 

California National Guards 

Major-General Charles G. Morton made his 
last official appearance as Commander of the 
Ninth Corps Area, Tuesday, at a reception 
given in his honor by the California National 
Guards and members of the San Francisco 
sector of the Association of the Army of the 
United States. Distinguished guests, included 
Lieutenant-General Hunter Liggett, retired, 
who commanded the American First Army in 
France; Major-General Wendall C. Neville, commanding 
the Department of the Pacific, United States Marine Corps; 
Captain C. W. Cole, chief of staff, Twelfth Naval District; 
and Brigadier-General Thornwall Mullally, organized re- 
serves. 

* * * 

Dance in Honor of Miss Edith Grant 

Mr. and Mrs. William A. Magee gave a party at their 
lovely home on Jackson Street last Friday night in honor 
of Miss Edith Grant, fiancee of William A. Magee Jr. 
Three hundred guests were present. 

A number of dinner parties preceded the dance. Miss 
Josephine Grant, sister of the charming bride-to-be, was 
hostess to Miss Edith Grant and her fiancee. Miss Jean 
Howard had a group of friends in honor of Miss Elizabeth 
Magee. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Hush Magee entertained a number 
of intimate friends at the St. Francis Hotel just before the 
dance. 

Mr. and Mrs. James C. Jackman also gave a dinner com- 
plimentary to a few friends preceding the social affair at 
the Magee home. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Evans Pillsbury (Olive Edrington), whose 
wedding took place on January 3 in New York, have been 
visiting the groom's father, Horace D. Pillsbury. 

* * * 

Leon Brooks Walter gave a dinner party in compliment 
to Mr. and Mrs. Evans Pillsbury at the Willis Walker home. 

* * * 

General and Mrs. Charles Gould Morton were given a 
dinner party recently by Colonel Percy Bishop, command- 
ing the San Francisco coast defenses, and Mrs. Bishop at 
their home at Fort Winlield Scott. The guests were Gen- 
eral and Mrs. Morton, Colonel and Mrs. Charles S. Lincoln, 
Colonel and Mrs. Lucius Holbrook, Major and Mrs. Sam 
Parker, and Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Calvert of Portland, Mc. 

* * * 

The evening of Monday. January 19, will see the leaders 
of society massed in a merry war to elect a queen of the 




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Gold Ball Mardi Gras. A dinner dance has 
been arranged to bring the several groups to- 
gether as votes for the queen are decided. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry H. Scott will give a 
dinner party on the night of the Gold Ball 
Mardi Gras in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Dunham of Chicago, who are arriving shortly 
for a visit. 

* * * 

Senator James Phelan gave a reception a 
few days ago in compliment to a group of 
writers. Gertrude Atherton was the honor 
guest, the event being planned as a farewell, 
preceding her trip abroad. Mrs. Rudolph 
Spreckels, Mrs. Charmian London, widow of 
Jack London, Mr. and Mrs. Downey Harvey, 
Mrs. Atherton Russell, Mr. William Gwin, 
George Sterling, Charles Caldwell Dobie, Mrs. 
Alexander Garceau were guests. 

* * * 

Judge and Mrs. W. W. Morrow gave a de- 
lightful dinner party recently in honor of their 
granddaughter, the former Miss Amy Fech- 
teler, and Ensign Robert Iverson Hicks, whose marriage 
was one of the most recent society events. 
* * * 

Mrs. Louis Titus of California, recognized as one of the 
best-gowned women in Washington, is wearing a black 
velvet dinner gown combined with white lace, the latter 
forming a deep circular flounce. This lace of heavy mesh is 
encrusted not only in pearls and crystals, but in minute 
particles of mirror glass which is the last word in Paris. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Newhall are leaving this month for a 
trip around the world. They will sail from New York on the 
Franconia, and at Nice they are to be joined by Mrs. Frederick 
McNear. Miss Kathryn Kilbourne and lack Breeden. 



9 trains daily 

to LOS ANGELES 



at convenient hours 
VIA COAST LINE 
Lv. San Francisco (Third St. Station) 

7:45 A.M. Daylight Limited 

8:00 A.M. Shore Line Limited 

6:16 P.M. Sunset Limited 

8:00 P.M. Lark 

4:50 P.M. Sunset Express 

VIA VALLEY LINE 

(Ferry Station) 
10:40 A M. Los Angeles Express 

6:00 P.M. Owl 

7:40 P.M. Padre (runs via Coast Line) 
11:40 P.M. Los Angeles Passenger 

Similar Service Returning 

Daily Fares, $27.50 round trip 
Week-end Fares, $25.00 round trip 



Ar. Los Angeles 
7:45 P.M. 
10:45 P.M. 
8:20 A.M. 
9:25 A.M. 
8:10 A.M. 


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Xote the convenience of departure and 
arrival times. Consider also the luxurious 
comfort and safety of the service. 

And you'll like Southern Pacific dining car service — highest 

quality food deliciously prepared and served at 

your accustomed meal time. 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

65 Geary St. 

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phord s..i'pr tr.on 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 17, 1925 




By Hoot McGregor 

So Miss Helen Wills has added a mid-iron to her tennis 



racket. 



The Bronxville Country Club at Mt. Vernon, New York, 
will bar the gentler sex from not only playing, but as 
guests of the Club as well. Caddies of this Club will wear 
red blouses and white knickers, and members will sport 
blazers, a la Saint Andrews, Scotland. 



The California open championship for golfers commenced 
on Thursday of this week, on the two courses of the Olym- 
pic Club. Every distinguished golfing visitor to California 
has endorsed these courses as good enough to stage a 
national event. An average golfer can get round either 
course in respectable figures, providing he uses his head as 
well as his stick, and a good golfer may medal them in par. 
According to Sam Whiting, they are both "in the pink." 

Some good advice is given to those who want to get most 
benefit from watching professionals play : Don't be too 
keen just to watch the flight of the ball, but watch the 
player swing from start to the finish of his stroke. 

An interesting program for the balance of the month for 
the- fair sex has been arranged by Mrs. E. C. Sewall, cap- 
tain of the Presidio Golf Club. These events are attracting 
a good field each week and Mrs. Sewall has proved herself 
a most efficient official. We can only give the last two 
events in this series: For next Friday, January 23, — third 
round for trophy and medal and putts for all. For the 
Friday following (the 30th) finals for trophy and match 
play. 



Of all the new faces in the field, the most important are 
the two Britishers, George Duncan and Abe Mitchell. The 
former is the only champion who calls himself Scotch. 
Abe Mitchell is an Englishman. The Duncan-Mitchell 
combination is the best in the world today. Al Watrous, 
who has been prominent in most of the representative open 
tournaments of recent years, is the next visitor of note. 



Duncan and Mitchell have been engaged for an eighteen 
hole match at Lincoln Park, next Monday afternoon, com- 
mencing at 1:30. John McHugh will be one of the op- 
ponents in this match. Johnny has won from fields in 
which golfers of national reputation have participated. 



The generosity of Herbert Fleishhacker, chairman of the 
Park Commission, has made this match possible, for he 
promptly guaranteed two-thirds of the expense of the en- 
gagement as soon as it was proposed. These golf stars 
will play today at the Burlingame Country Club, but on this 
occasion they will dissolve partnership. Sunday they will 
get their first glimpse of the New Ingleside links of the 
San Francisco Golf and Country Club, where they will be 
opposed by the two Harolds, Sampson and Clark. 



Did you know that all the great golfers of the day have 
played on San Francisco's public course, including Walter 
Hagen and Joe Kirkwood, Gene Sarazen and "Click" 
Evans. The brilliant roster will be completed by Duncan 
and Mitchell. 



Another engagement for the Britishers, announced by 
their manager, Davis Scott-Chisholm, is to be held at San 
Jose Country Club. Wednesday, January 21st. 



The Hotel Stewart was the scene of the annual meet- 
ing of the Professional Golfers' Association of Northern 
California, Monday evening, the 12th. The meeting was 
preceded by a dinner at the same hostelry. This associa- 
tion has made wonderful progress during the last two years, 
and recently became affiliated with the P. G. A. of America, 
the national body. 



The secretary of the California Golf Association, Robert 
M. Eyre, announces the receipt of eighty entries for the 
California open championship, including seventy-four pro- 
fessionals and six amateurs. 



Last week Mrs. Ida Sargent Anderson took possession of 
the Mrs. Brent Potter trophy for one month in the play at 
the San Jose Golf and Country Club, her card of 96-9-87 
giving her the right. This handsome sterling vase has 
been played for since last March and from all indications 
will continue to be played for indefinitely. 



Porto Rico 

Porto Rico, Its Importance and Beauty, is a book that 
is marvelously well illustrated, and which contains a vast 
deal of information for the mainland American people. 
Porto Rico is an American territory now twenty-five years 
old, and its Americanism is of such a character that it 
must hokl the admiration of every reader of this book. The 
effect of such a publication will be to remove many false 
impressions which now exist. 

Very few people know that Porto Rico was the first of 
any state or territory to offer the country an armed and 
trained force in its defense during the world war and the 
first Porto Rico regiment was selected for the defense of the 
Panama Canal and it fulfilled this duty throughout the war. 

Porto Rico's patriotism has never been doubted and it 
gave another and a most impressive testimonial in that 
direction by paying the most for the White House wool 
sold for the benefit of the Red Cross. The pictures, taken 
from magnificent photographs, show the type of men and 
women who are the citizens of Porto Rico. It is doubt- 
ful if any other part of the United States could show more 
beautiful women and children or more splendidly set-up men. 
Other illustrations show structures housing the schools of the 
territory and other pages show the magnificent roads which 
traverse the Island in all directions. Many motorists take 
their machines from the mainland to Porto Rico, in order 
to enjoy motoring over the 1,500 miles of magnificent roads. 
Porto Rico is easily reached from San Francisco by the 
Swayne and Hoyt line of steamers, but it is along com- 
mercial lines that California will benefit mostly and the 
people of Porto Rico are anxious to improve trade relations. 

Trade relations are improving with all Latin America 
and Porto Rico is a natural bridge over which a much easier 
approach to an improvement may be made with any South 
American country. Published by Clarence E. Ferguson, 
care of Mary Morgan, Printer, San Francisco. 



January 17, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




By ANTISTHENES 

Bucking the Grade 

SENATOR Jack Inman's recently de- 
clared intention to work to reduce 
the legislature to forty members char- 
acterizes the Sacramento solon as a 
forward thinker. Too many cooks at 
the political broth have made our civic 
soup non-edible and though we are op- 
posed to centralized government we 
feel the commonwealth could stand a 
big chunk of decentralizing and still 
be the gainer. 

One glaring fault of the system is 
that so many are headed for Sacra- 
mento and small glory, that it is im- 
possible for the electorate to sort the 
herd into goats and sheep, so, the but- 
terins butt through and hence the com- 
plexion of our legislative preserves. 
Some concentration on the merits — or 
demerits — of candidates might obtain 
were the crowd not so thick, and provi- 
dence on bur side and with the breaks 
in luck, we might be able to get an 
even chance. 

The ideal way, of course, would be 
to subject the runnerups to an exami- 
nation pat'erned somewhat after civil 
service tests, but even with providence 
batting on our side, it would be im- 
possible to put that over, for the legis- 
lators themselves would have to pass 
on the improvement and you're de- 
mented did you allow these lads 
are aching to commit hari-kari. So 
while we wish Senator Inman oodles 
of luck we tell him he's on a treach- 
erous grade, he has no skid chains 
aboard, his gas is low and his carbure- 
tor is all out of whack. 



We always suspected that "great 
British naval victory at Jutland" was 
fluky, and now Admiral Reginald Ba- 
con goes a little further than simply 
acknowledging it so to accuse Ad- 
miral Bcatty of "being to blame for 
this great failure of the war's greatest 
sea conflict !" However, suppression of 
the truth at the time steadied the allies 
and seemingly propaganda hath her 
victories more than candor. 



We reserve our private opinion as 
to Adolph Uhl's recent tearing down 
of "educational" posters desecrating 
light standards in Union Square, but 
we hint to Adolph we're with him. 
Now the astute manager who sought 
this class A free advertising space 
threatens to sue Uhl for destruction of 



DIVIDEND NOTICES 

The San Francisco Bank 

(LATELY THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS 
AND LOAN SOCIETY) 

526 California St. (and Branches), 
San Francisco 



property ! We hope we are on the 
jury that'll try the case. 

* * * 

Pauline Fredericks has ascended a 
few rounds further to the top of the 
movie star ladder by her recent third 
divorce. For it seems we have come 
to measure an actor's professional suc- 
cess by the number of his matrimonial 
failures. * * * 

The San Francisco press generally 
is to be congratulated on its forbear- 
ing to elaborate on Los Angeles' re- 
cent serious outbreak, but good ex- 
ample seems wasted on our southern 
sister city: the other evening we here 
were treated to a slight seismic flutter 
and a friend of ours, just returned 
from the sunny metropolis, asked us 
seriously if there had been any casual- 
ties ! No Damon and Pythias there, 
brother. * * * 

Who and why and how are the "six- 
ty teamsters" still in the City employ 
and mentioned recently by the Bureau 
of Governmental Research? Didn't we 
some weeks ago hearken to the edify- 
ing news from the Purchaser of Sup- 
plies that he had purchased motive 
trucks to take the places of those 
archaic, patronage-producing, nag 
drawn, scarcely motivating dump wag- 
ons? Or did the mountain of promised 
efficiency travail and bring forth but 
the proverbial mouse of hokum? 

* * * 

Gloria Swanson has received her 
final degree of divorce. Though only 
a second termer — hymeneally speaking 
—Gloria has advanced rapidly in mag- 
nitude among the constellation of 
movie stars. However, so conformity 
with the apparently accepted legend of 
"little notoriety, little advancement" al- 
most generally obtaining among that 
fraternity may prevail, we might recall 
how a near scandal or two were con- 
nected with Gloria's earlier career. 
That must account for the apparent 
deviation from the rule. 



"San Francisco Knows Mow" may be 
euphonious and correct, but "San Fran- 
cisco Has the Lowest Municipal Tax 
Rate" we think a more practical slo- 
gan to draw population and capital to 
us. However, as its adoption would 
work to knock the props from under 
the consummate knockers hereabout 
we do not anticipate the papers will 
take kindly to the suggestion. There 
is no craft so numerous as the frater- 
nity of hammer pushers. 



For the quarter year ending December 31st. 
1924, a dividend has been declared at the rate 
of four and one quarter (4 J 4) per cent per 
annum on all deposits, payable on and after 
January 2nd, 1925. Dividends not called for 
are added to the deposit account and earn 
interest from January 1st, 1925. Deposits 
made on or before January lUth. 1925. will 
earn interest from January 1st, 1925. 

A. H. MULLER, Secretary. 



BANK OF ITALY 

Head OIKee and San Francisco RrancheH 

For the half year ending December 31, 1924, 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of 
four (4) per cent per annum on all Savings 
Deposits, payable on and after January 2, 
1925. Dividends not called for are added to 
and bear the same rate of interest as the 
principal from January 1, 1925. SAVINGS 
DEPOSITS MADE ON THE FIRST BUSINESS 
DAY OF ANY MONTH (OR ON OR BEFORE 
THE TENTH DAY OF JANUARY. APRIL, 
JULY AND OCTOBER) WILL EARN INTER- 
EST FROM THE FIRST OF THAT MONTH; 
DEPOSITS MADE AFTER SAID DATE WILL 
EARN INTEREST FROM THE FIRST OF 
THE FOLLOWING MONTH. 

JAMES A. BACIGALUPT, President. 



Italian American Bank 

S. E. corner Montgomery and Sacramento 
sts. ; North Beach Bi anch, corner Columbus 
ave. and Broadway; Columbus Branch, corner 
Montgomery and Washington sts. — For the 
half year ending December 31, 1924, a divi- 
dend has been declaied at the rate of four 
and one-quarter (4*4) per cent per annum on 
all savings deposits, payable on and after 
January 2, 1925. Dividends not called for will 
be added to the principal and bear the same 
rate of interest from January 1, 1925. De- 
posits made on or before January 10, 1925, 
will earn Interest from January 1. 1925. 

A. E. SBARBORO. President. 



The Hibernia Savings 
and Loan Society 

Main Office, corner Market, McAllister and 
Jones Sts.; Mission Office, corner Valencia and 
22d sts — Po the half year ending Dec:smoer 
31, 1984, a dividend has been declared at the 
1 four (4) per cent per annum on all 
deposits, payable on and after Friday. Janu- 
ary 2. 1925, Dividends not drawn will be 
added to depositors' accounts, become a part 
thereof and will earn dividends from January 
1, 1925. Deposits made on or before January 
10, 1926, will earn interest from January 1, 
1925. 

J. O. TOBIN. Vice-President. 



The French- American Bank 

r Savings Department l. l">> Putter st and 
Branches — For the half year ending Decem- 
ber 81, 1924. a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of four and one-quarter <4»4> per 
cent per annum on all deposits, payable on 
and after January 2. 19 25. Dividends not 
called for are added to and bear the same 
rate <>f interest as the principal from January 
l. L9SB. Deposits made on or before January 
ir>. 1925, will earn interest from January 1. 
1925. 

LEON BOCQUERAZ. President. 



\\\i IL mi i:Tf\f; 

The Joshua Hendy Iron Works 

The regular annual meeting of th»* stock- 
holders of The Joshua Hendy Iron Works will 
tie held at the office of the corporation, No. 7.". 
Fremont Street, i^an Francisco. California, on 
Tuesday, the 10th dny of February, li- 
the hour of 10 o'clock a. m.. for the purpose 
of electing a Board of Directors to serve for 
the ensuing year, and the transaction of such 
other business as may come befo-e the meet- 
ing. CHAS. C. GARDNER, 

Secretary. 
Office: 75 Fremont Str 
San Francisco. Calif. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 17, 1925 



Wheat and Chaff 

By Nathaniel Anderson 




«T E 

JL/ clothes, and we will go to 
Los Angeles." Why is this offer 
an ugly bespat ering of our 
page? Because it is in the usual 
terms of an insult. Everyone 
knows we have not quoted a fre- 
quent proposal by some generous 
man to a needy but ambitious 
youth, but a bid for the honor of 
a woman — vile in being a purely 
ma'erial one. Where it is' ac- 
cep'ed, the love given in return 
for the clothes is always in the 
measure of the kind suited to the 
cold-blooded spirit suggested by 
the proposition. 

As Judge O'Brien was pro- 
voked into censuring a flirt 
caught annoying the telephone 
girls, the writer is agi'ated as his mind is frequently com- 
pelled by the like incidents to revert to the tawdry aspect of 
his kind, though the incident he proceeds to relate gives him 
a bit of satisfaction. The woman in it accepted an invitation 
to dinner from one of the clients of her firm, after refusing 
on a half-dozen other occasions with excuses apparent to any 
but the crudest of mashers. The result of the dinner was the 
offer of the unlovely trip to Los Angeles, and the answer was 
a laugh, but the woman found it hard to make a fool of a 
fool. After five or six more refusals of his dinner invitations, 
the man once more found himself beside the lady in a res- 
taurant, but a most expensive one this time, the lady with an 
appetite richly-de'ermined on her part to be a stunner to her 
companion. He was compelled to behave, as well as pay the 
bill equal to the cost of three bachelors on a whiskey-spree. 

From last accounts the man has been trained into being a 
good friend, with no particular amorous aspirations. 



\nthanlol AmlerKon 



populace are pleased to call "old hens." Special thought is 
here given to the Eighteenth Amendment. 

Down in the s ; ate of blue grass colonels they passed a pippin 
of a law the other day. Imagine an effort to check by law 
neighborly converse, or even the tongue of the more acrid 
gossip ! That was Kentucky's idea. We give deference in 
description to the question put in a local edi'orial: "What 
greater affront could Kentucky offer mankind ?" We have yet 
to come to the belief that the drys throughout the country will 
win out, tenacious as they are. As for the law in Kentucky 
referred to, why, the women will talk it down. 



A farmer had a dispute with his son. For some months 
they quarreled away, and at last, wishing to settle matters 
one way or the other, the farmer issued a summons against 
the young man. 

"Your name is Hezekiah Perkins, is it not?" inquired the 
opposing counsel. 

"It is, sir," replied the farmer, in dignified tones. 

"You have brought this action against your son?" 

"I have, sir." 

"And do I understand you to say that you have ignored 
your son for the past month?" 

"What?" asked the old man, somewhat puzzled. 

"Have you ignored your son for the past month?" 

"Oh, no," said the old man, shaking his head. "I have 
had nothing whatever to do with him." 



Established 28 Years 

EXTRA HAIR 
COVER THE BOB 



FOR 

WEAR 



EVENING 

NOW BEING SHOWN AT 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

815 Clement Street San Francisco 360 Geary Street 

2331 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley 
MR. AND MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 



All ye men who have reached forty, hear! As has been the 
case with o'hers from ye olden times to the present, the world 
conspires to keep you old. Brace up, and for the next sixty 
and ten years slap an occasional vigorous thought back. Don't 
get caught mentally climbing downhill. And you do not need 
the company of James J. Montague's saucy flapper. 



Overeating is the great bane of life, and the only way to 
attend a banquet is to be on hand hungry as a wolf. Don't in- 
dulge in food all the day previous, and be prepared to sleep 
half of the following day. Pity the poor statesmen ! who 
mostly all die too young because they are banquet-fed. If 
they follow our rule, they will receive both joy and nourish- 
ment. 

* * * 

If the great majority of men are honest, as many like to 
repeat, what on earth is meant by honesty? 



The remains of the puritanical habit of regulating conduct 
are still with us. We hope to see a blessed future entirely 
without them. What is left of prohibitions against or per- 
sonal conduct and demands upon it dies hard in the first half 
of this twentieth century, too much reinforced by acts of 
legislators influenced by silly male reformers and what the 



Qasa de zJXCanana 

La Jolla, Cal. 

San Diego County 



Southern California's new season 
hotel, located directly on the 
ocean shore on Coast Boulevard. 
100 rooms, 100 baths. Built in the 
Spanish Renaissance style. Has 
all of the up-to-date comforts of 
the modern hotels of today. Only 
strictly fresh products used on 
our table. Cuisine American. 
Rates from $8.00 per day and up- 
ward, American plan. Special 
weekly and monthly rates. Write 
for illustrated folder to 

CASA DE MANANA 
La Jolla, Calif. 



fa 



January 17, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 






i FlNANCIAp 



By Edward H. Manning 

THE merger idea is getting into the financial district, 
and not too soon. We have too many investment 
houses scrambling for the crumbs in dull periods. It is 
not a bad idea for the established houses to strengthen 
themselves and buttress their working force against the 
"let out" danger. The public will gain, too, for it is the 
weaker houses that are responsible for the "take a chance" 
issues that bring discredit on the whole business. 

^c % $ 

— The latest amalgamation is that between the brokerage 
houses of M. P. Lilienthal & Co. and Milton A. Bremer & 
Co., both holders of memberships in the Stock and Bond 
Exchange. Max P. bears an honored name in Californian 
finance and has been a member of the Montgomery Street 
Exchange for many years. Bremer's membership dates back 
a score of years. The other two partners, John B. Lowe 
and Richard O. Simon, are well known in the district, known 

and respected. 

* * * 

— Irrigation is booming. A bill is to be "promulgated" in 
the Legislature by John Creighton of Bakersfield, looking 
for a half million appropriation for surveys concerning a 
project to erect dams on every stream flowing from the 
Sierra Nevada Mountains into the San Joaquin or Sacra- 
mento Valleys, in order to conserve "waste" waters in 
winter. The scheme includes connecting the high moun- 
tain lakes by tunnels, and running their water into nearby 
streams. * * * 

■ — Among the prominent irrigation specialists who fore- 
gathered last week to discuss the proposal at Sacramento, 
I noticed the cheery Campbell, of Stephens & Co., busier 
than the busiest of bees, suggesting, criticising, ever smiling. 
Wonderful digestion that man must have, nothing seems 
able to run a wrinkle through his face. If ever there was 
an incurable optimist, Campbell, the irrepressible, is he. 
Which accounts for the pace at which he forges ahead, the 
ease with which he overcomes every obstacle, the success 
of every issue he sponsors. 

* * * 

— Bradstreet's forecast is full of wisdom, but there is a 
note of nervousness which may be all right, but is pre- 
mature. It cannot be said that our business men are going 
ahead any too fast yet, nor that they do not realize the 
dangers inherent in doing so. It cannot be said, moreover, 
that stock markets have nearly discounted the probable 
prosperity that seems insured. The devils are nowhere the 
Gadarenes porkers yet ; the bankers are busy, too, erecting 
fences on the precipice edges. 

* * * 

— So Calpack directors refused to do what the financial 
experts told us they would. Because the position does not 
warrant an immediate dividend increase, and they are very 
cautious folk. Strongly entrenched as the business is, big 
dividends are unwise in the case of one of that character. 
Moreover, 6 per cent is plenty. That it may be increased 
to 7 per cent in the near future is a possibility, but I know 
enough of the big men in it to know that when it is it will 
be because no fear is entertained that a bad year or two 
would render "passing," or even a reduction, necessarv. 
This is not to say that good news is not to be expected— of 
a different nature. When the market price goes under 100 
get ready to buy. to hold for the long pull. 
(Continued on Page lt>> 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

1 LATELY THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY) 
SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

• by mergers orconsolidatlon s with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1924 

Assets $96,917,170.69 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,009,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 461,746.52 

MISSION BRANCH Mission snd 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave, and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER {4%) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid Up Capital $20,000,000 $20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued. CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES 
THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON. ENG.; NEW YORK; 
PORTLAND. ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

San Franclaeo Ofllcei 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Anst. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

Walter W. Derr, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douclas 2244 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



"The Largest Fire Insurance 
Company in America" 

Fire, Automobile, Windstorm. 
Tourists' Baggage Insurance 
: : REASONABLE RATES 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 
208 Crocker Building (Opposite Palace Hotel) San Francisco 
Phone Kearny 391 



"Mayerle's Eyewater" 

H'or :tO yrnrn the mnxt popular Kyr Tonic 
for rhlUIren and adnlt*. At druKpltlx 35c, 
by mall 70c. 

George Mayerle, Expert Ootician, 960 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 




12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 17, 1925 




>LE/4SUI$'SW4ND 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ lorn Moore, 




By Katherine Schwartz 
Formerly of the "Chicago Tribune" 



Alcazar 

WELL! Well! If you want to know a sure cure for 
the blues — just go to the Alcazar this week ! But 
I warn you, if you don't want to laugh until your sides 
ache, you had better stay away! 

In their new play, "Just Married, "Henry Duffy and his 
excellent company have certainly shown "the City That 
Knows How" — how. From start to finish it is a laughing 
riot. One hardly knows where to begin — even the smallest 
part is so well done. 

In the first act, Henry Duffy, ably assisted by the ver- 
satile stage director, — and who let me tell you, is no slouch 
of an actor, — simply convulses the audience with his imper- 
sonation of the very much jagged young hero, Robert 
Adams. 

And dainty and talented Dale Winters ! Well you already 
know what a splendid, and talented young actress she is 
anyway, but in "Just Married" she gathered in all kinds 
of new laurels. 

As for all the rest of the cast, — from Ruth Hammond, 
new in the cast, Dorothy Lamar, Florence Roberts, Maurice 
Franklin, George Leffingwell, Leo Leone, and all the rest, — 
all must be commended for the splendid support which they 
give. 

I must mention also, the ship, the good ship Lafayette, 
on the decks and in the stateroom of which, the action of 
this very funny piece takes place — it certainly is a master- 
piece, and Mr. Murphy is to be congratulated upon the 
success of this very realistic stage setting. 

I am sure that "Just Married" will see a longer run even, 
than the "Cat and the Canary," and I know of no better nor 
happier way to spend any evening than to go and see this 
farce. 



S. F. Symphony 

Perhaps no artist who has visited San Francisco this 
season, has made a more pleasant impression on his aud- 
ience than E. Robert Schmitz, pianist, who appeared with 
the Symphony at its regular symphony concerts at the 
Curran Theatre this week. 

In a quiet, unassuming manner, he wins his audience by 
such brilliant technique, and beautiful interpretation that 
they were loathe to let him go. In the Burleske in D minor 
by Richard Strauss, there was little opportunity for heavy 
wo-k, and for a time, it led us to believe that it was not 
one of his accomplishments, but in the Symphonic Varia- 
tions for piano and orchestra by Cesar Franck he displayed 
a solidity and depth of schooling equalled by few. 

The regular symphony program opened with "Surprise 
Symphony in G Major," by Haydn, with its simple, yet 
serene melodies and perfect construction. The closing num- 
ber, the Prelude and Love Death from "Tristan and Isolde" 
by Wagner, was read by Dr. Hertz and his splendid orches- 
tra in such a manner as to further convince us that there are 
few better students of Wagner than he. 



lard, the popular movie comic in a new comedy by Ted 
McClane called "Oh Uncle." 

The concert and operatic stage will contribute an inter- 
nationally famous prima donna Mme. Bernice De Pasquali. 
The circus sends Lillian St. Leon, and Bostock's Riding 
School a mammoth comedy act with five riders and five 
horses. 

Musical comedy will be represented by Jessis Maker and 
William Redford in an amusing skit called "Rolling Stones." 
Dave Apollon sensational Russian artist is bringing his new 
edition of "Bi-Ba-Bo" with Ramona, M. Markoff, and 
Dorothy Campbell. 

Corinne Tilton, "The Cha'ter Box Doll," the Lorner Girls; 
Nelson Keyes, English character comedian is staying over 
a second week. He is assisted by Irene Russell. 



Strand 

Will King and his company present an unusually good 
offering this week — "Friend Wife." 

The dialogue is good, and this week there is a good plot, 
which affords Will King and his inseparable partner, Lew 
Dunbar with an excellent opportunity in their particular 
line of comedy. 

Howard Evans certainly knows how to put over a group 
of songs, and this week, from the opening number to the last 
group, splendid work is done. 

Special mention must be made of Will Aubrey and his 
yodeling, and the group I liked best, was the one in which 
Mildred Markle, Clara Larinoff and the Star Trio sang a 
group of "Moonlight" songs. The costuming of this num- 
ber was exceptionally pretty and artistic. 

Hermie King and his men give a delightful concert, fea- 
turing the versatile Milton Frumkin, who plays on a number 
of insfuments. all equally well. 

Next week the offering will be "Listen, Dolly." 



Golden Gate 

Next week brings William Frawley and Edna Louis in 
a Paul Gerard Smith sketch, Helen Coyne and Henri 
French, classic dancers an all feature supporting show, 
and the exclusive San Francisco showing of Charlie Ray's 
new picture produced by the late Thomas Ince, "Dvnamite 
Smith." 

Others on the prog'am are Mel Klee, the blackface mono- 
logist better known as the "Prince of Wails," Bert Gordon 
and his pretty dancing partner Alice Knowlton, both ex- 
cellent comedians ; Winifred Clarke with a new fun offer- 
ing, "Now What." Richard Hayes a juggler and ball 
bouncer, who with his very much colored valet creates a 
lot of fun. 

There are short films and splendid music by Claude 
Sweeten's orchestra. 



Orpheum 

The program at the Orpheum this week reads like a 
roster of celebrities of the stage. There will be SnubPol- 



Curran 

Pauline Frederick will m?ke her second appearance on the 
stage here at the Curran Theatre, Monday evening, in Mar- 
tin Brown's play. "The Lady" which Louis O. Macloon is 
bringing here to follow his production of "The Goose Hangs 
High" which closes tonight. 



January 17, 1925 

"The Lady" has to do with a music hall 
girl whose child, the son of a young 
scamp, a nobleman's son is about to be 
taken from her by the father of her 
lover. She gives the child away and loses 
sight of it, while she sinks into the gut- 
ter. Then in after years, her own boy, 
in her resort commits a murder, and the 
mother, discovering who he is, lakes the 
crime on her shoulders to save the boy. 



Wilkes 

The Wilkes Theatre opened in a blaze 
of glory Monday night, all refurnished 
and redecorated. 

There was a great crowd out to wel- 
come back those ever popular favorites, 
Kolb and Dill in their new vehicle, 
"Politics." The lobby looked like some- 
body had moved up an entire florist store 
there. 

It seemed good to see Kolb and Dill 
once more in a "girl show." They have 
not, however, reverted to the old slap- 
stick methods of twenty years ago, to 
get their laughs, they do sing and dance 
though, and the audience welcomed them 
with gusto. 

The second act features Ernest Ball 
and seven girls, Florence Rose Cleave- 
land, Clorine Engle, Mildred Carroll, 
Dorothy Bushner, Marion Lorraine, 
Clive Gray, and Stephanie Newton. They 
feature some new songs by Mr. Rail, as 
well as some of his ever popular old 
favorites. 

Special mention must be made of the 
fine work done by May Cloy, Eddie 
O'Brien, Mike Donlin, Mr. Elliott and 
Miss Clinchard. Kolb and Dill, as al- 
ways, are the whole show, and it is a 
riot of fun from start to finish. 



Columbia 

There is one of the best classic reper- 
toire companies at the Columbia in an 
age. 

The opening night Duma's "1 hree 
Musketeers" was the offering, and Fri'z 
Leiber brings to this characler all the 
romance, swashbuckling, lovemaking, and 
adventure that one could expect or 
imagine in the role of D'Artagnan. There 
is a splendid supporting cast, who read 
their lines extremely well, and Mr. Lei- 
ber has shown a fine discrimination in 
their selection. 

It is qui e a step from "The Three 
Musketeers" to the various plays of 
Shakespeare which this company will 
appear in for the balance of their stay, 
but I have no doubt, judging from the 
excellence of their performance the open- 
ing night, that they will in every way 
prove more than equal to the task. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 

On the vaudeville part of the bill will 
be seal Brosius ana Brown, billed as 
"The Brainless Wonders." Ray and Eva 
La Rue in "Hollywood," De Marco's 
"Harpland" in "Melodious Moments;" 
Morley and Auger "He Who Gets Slap- 
ped ;" and Joe Melvin in a European 
comedy novelty. 



13 



Beatty's Casino 

Next week the picture at the Casino 
will be "Greater Than Marriage," featur- 
ing Marjorie Daw. Lou Tellegen, Dag- 
mar Godowsky and a strong supporting 
cast. 



Ceremonies at Legion of Honor Palace 
Last Sunday it was cold but sunny, 
but even the coldest wind wouldn't have 
kept away the enthusias'.ic crowd that 
gathered in the spacious court of the Pal- 
ace by the Sea, and witnessed the unveil- 
ing of the Memorial Palms, presented by 
the Republic of France, and the dedica- 
tion of the Concert Organ, the latter be- 
ing the gift of John D. Spreckels. Very 
simply, Mr. Spreckels presented his gift, 
saying: "You have it in your hands; it 
is yours. I have bought it for the peo- 
ple of California." 

An excellent musical program was ren- 
dered by the orchestra, which was con- 
ducted by Eugene E. Schmitz, and there 
were many old-timers who rejoiced in 
seeing 'Gene manipulating his baton 
again. The attendance at the Palace for 
the last few weeks has numbered into 
the hundreds of thousands, people as a 
rule believing that the slight climb up th: 
hill is amply repaid by the wonderful 
view from the heigh s, and the interest- 
ing features of the Palace itself. 



The Comfort Route 

The Royal Mail S. S. Company, with 
offices at 544 Market St. have issued some 
very interesting and prettily go I en up 
booklets, describing in text and picture 
the comforts to he found on their dif- 
ferent steamers. — the "( Irbi'a." the 
"Orca," the "Ohio," ami the "Orduna." 
Here we find state room luxury that can 
only be compared to the be^t hotels, with 
two, three or four her lis. or the taste- 
fully furnished "cabin-de-luxe. " which 
might be a replica of a room in one of 

(Continued on P&gr 



ALCAZAR 

O'Fnr-cll Strr«*l at Powell 

Telephone Kearny Two 

-ml » nk Sunilny Night. January i-ili 

Seat* Now: 

THE HENRY Dl FFV PLAYERS 

Prenrnt 

A Boat Load of Lanfcha 

"JUST MARRIED" 

By (he Author of "Ahle'a Irish Roue" 

Nights: 25c, 50c. 75c $1. $1.25 

Bargain Matinees Wednesday. Thursday 

Saturday — 25c. 50c, 75c 



^you pay no more a 



fiESTFLOWHg 




TWb*» <f* TTnutnd Ondero' 

224-226 GarrtrW. lei Kearny 4975 



Amusements 



SE.XT \\ EBK 



ALEXANDRIA 
18th and Geary 



"His Hour" 



CASINO 
Ellis and Mason 



'Greater Than 
Marriage" 

Vaudeville 



CAMEO 
936 Market St. 



"The Memphis 
Minstrels" 

30 Colored Entertainers 



CURRAN 
Geary, Nr. Mason 



Pauline Frederick 

(In Person) 

"The Lady" 



CALIFORNIA 

4th and Market 



"The Dark Swan" 



COLUMBIA 
Eddy and Mason 



Fritz Lieber in 
Repertoire 



CAPITOL 

64 Ellis St. 



"White Collars" 



GRANADA 

1066 Market St. 



I Reginald Denny in 
J "Oh, Doctor" 



GOLDEN GATEl Vaudeville and 
G. G. Ave. and Taylor] Pictures 



IMPERIAL 

1077 Market St. 



"Greed" 



LOEWS 
WARFIELD 
988 Market St. 



I" 



Beban in 

The Greatest Love 
of All" 



METROPOLITAN 

2055 Union St. 



'The Sea Hawk" 



NEW FILLMORE 
NEW MISSION 



"Captain Blood" 



ORPHEUM 
O'Farrell and Powell 



Vaudeville 



ROYAL 

1529 Polk St. 



"Three Women" 



STRAND 
965 Market St. 



Will Kind and 
Compnny In 

'Listen, Dolly" 



WILKES?™'''! K ° lb * ndDiU 



Geary and Mason 



'} 



in 
"Politics" 



Concerts 



S. F. Symphony 

Popular C'oneert. Sundny Afternoon. January 
I-. currnn Theatre. Seventh Pair Regular 
Concerts. Erna Rubinstein, Violinist. 

Krl.. Jan. 23. 3 no p. m. CURRAN 
In, Jon. 2.".. 2:4.'. p. m. THEATER 

E. Robert Schmitz Illustrated 
Lecture Recital 

Monday Fvenln(C. January 19, St. Francis 
Colonial Ballroom. 

Thursdny Evening:. January 22. Recital. Srol- 
tlsh Rite Hull. 

Jascha Heifetz, Violinist 
Beatty's Casino 

Sunday Afternoon. January Is. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 17, 1925 




By KEM 
"After a longlsh run on homespun and calico In fiction fashions, 
this season's novels incline to the employment of more sophisticated 
and luxurious materials. Having investigated the small towns and 
the remoter rural regions, the slums and the service quarters, we 
are invited to refresh our aesthetic sensibilities with an hour of 
drawing room amenities." — Isabel Paterson in The Bookman, 
December, 1924. 

CfT^HE White Monkey," by Galsworthy, "The Little 
J. French Girl" by Anne Douglas Sedgwick, "A Pas- 
sage to India" by E. M. Forster, "Nina" by Susan Ertz, 
all come under the category of "Drawing Room Fiction," 
and are worthily ranked amongst the best novels of the 
year. The Bookman's Monthly Score given in the Christ- 
mas number, shows more of a leaning in some cases towards 
the "homespun and calico"; viz: 

So Big by Edna Ferber, 
Rose of the World by Kathleen Norris, 
The Little French Girl by Anne Douglas Sedgwick, 
A Gentleman of Courage by James Oliver Curwood, 
The Home-maker by Dorothy Canfield, 
The Able McLaughlins by Margaret Wilson, 
The Plastic Age by Percy Marks, 
Old New York by Edith Wharton, 
Peacock Feathers by Temple Bailey, 
The Coming of Amos by William J. Locke. 
A number of novels which may be said to belong to the 
"Between" class and which are very much called for still at 
bookshops and libraries are "The Interpreter's House," 
which gives us both the drawing room and the business 
world ; "Julie Cane," which keeps us oscillating between 
the homes of the well-to-do and the grocery store, and 
"Mother Mason," which supplies charmingly the at- 
mosphere of comfortable American family life. Sophisti- 
cates are reading Michael Arlen's "Green Hat," "Charming 
People," Aldous Huxley's "Young Archimedes." Readers 
who like to hark back to colorful, romantic times or person- 
alities and are spurred on by radio hints are calling loudly 
for "The Divine Lady" by E. Barrington, "The Beauty of 
the Purple," by Wm. Stearns Davis, "The Slave Ship," by 
Mary Johnston, or "Ariel," and the life of Shelley by Andre 
Maurois. 

Besides, these mentioned, are scores of novels, some of 
them worthwhile, to satisfy the taste of the normal fiction 
readers and some of them unmistakably the output of the 
"Melting Pot," which Henry B. Fuller in the December 
21st "New York Times Review," tells us forcefully and 
truly "is beginning to smell." To quote: 

"A young, eager, ambitious, receptive people, newly 
stirred to an interest in music, art and literature, opens 
wide its mouth and deeply expands its chest to take in — 
what? Well, whatever a congeries of new arrivals, rather 
irresponsible and often insolent beyond its own conscious- 
ness, chooses to provide; . . . 'the new fiction,' per- 
haps long or short. Here we begin to encounter the 'soul !' 
The soul has multiplied of late, and it is too often small, cheap 
naked and nasty. Really, souls ought to dress more — as 
once they used to . . . but the new soul, parading the 
literary beach with no vestige of attire, and disclosing will- 
ingly, even eagerly, its foulnesses and deformities, calls 
loudly for the bathrobe. . . . The lowest depth of all 
is_ reached in the • moving pictures. . . . Hollywood 
with its clinches and close-ups, its ready-made orgies of the 
upper world and the under world, its distortions of actual 
life . . • the men and money come from the East . . . 
they represent. a metropolitan 'throw-off in the direction of 



California ... so out here they are, cutting up cal- 
culated, commercialized viciousness into standard lengths, 
. . . and despatching these wherever two or three 
hundred may be gathered together. These may be loosely 
grouped as the Emotionals. There remain the Intellectuals. 
These irk us almost as much. They are here to tell us What, 
How and Why. The young Intellectual of alien race is a 
trial. He himself needs to be told that stark mentality and 
abstract theory (coupled with the merest minimum of 
practical experience) leads you, if any where, to — Russia. 
. . . . The Intellectuals, however they may have been 
balked on their quest for the good things of life, are mostly 
earnest and honest . . . but to the body of greedy and 
irresponsible adventurers who have taken it upon them- 
selves to supply the emotional needs of this land of ours 
it may be worth while to say that there is an America, and 
that it is not so new and pliable as it seems, but is grounded 
on something that the acquisitive newcomer may well 
pause to sense . . . that it has come to feel disgusted 
at finding the general fiber of its life so coarsened and 
cheapened and its general atmosphere so vitiated and pol- 
luted. . . . Therefore, brethren of the Newer Miscel- 
lany, lay off . . . try to understand the tone and tem- 
per you have found here, and do a little less to impair the 
one and to try the other." 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

tf/PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL. ELDER'S LIBRARY 
239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



Make yourself at home at 

GEORGE HARGENS OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tillmann Place, at 241 Grant Ave. 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Rare Books — First Editions — Pine Bindings 

Importations from Zachnsdorf, Root, Morrell, etc., of London 

Commissions in London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

Phone Kearny 5816 



Be Photographed This Year on Your Birthday 




STUDIOS IN All. 

PRINCIPAL CITIES OF 

CALIFORNIA 



Oakland 

408 Hrli Street 

Snn Franeliico 

41 Grant Avenue 



St. Mary's Academy 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 



For particulars address 
SISTER SUPERIOR 



Select Boarding and Day School Under the 
Direction of the Sisters of St. Dominic 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Salt* Pressed By Hnnd Only— Salt* Called For and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

PARISIAN DYEING AND CLEANING 



521 Pout Street 
In Vlrclnla Hotel 



Snn Franclaco 
Phone Franklin 2510 



January 17, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



Hollywood Gossip 

By Madeline Jamison 



WHERE TO DINE 



ARE the French and German producers going to take 
our best motion picture material away from us? The 
foreign fields seem to have a strong lure for many of our 
popular stars. Every few days we read in the papers that 
another famous one has gone abroad. 

Gloria Swanson, Norma Talmadge, Carmel Myers, Jus- 
tine Johnston, and Kathleen Key are all in Europe, and 
now comes the news that Betty Blythe has accepted a 
long term contract in France and is leaving soon. The 
Gish girls long ago professed a fondness for working 
abroad. After a six years absence from California, they 
returned for the opening night of "Romola" at Grauman's 
theatre in Hollywood and stayed less than two weeks. 

It is said that Bettye Blythe has offers from a French 
company that she is considering, and that certain European 
companies are moving heaven and earth to get Gloria 
Swanson, offering her fabulous sums, but the latest rumor 
is that she has signed a contract with Joseph Schenk in 
Paris to make pictures for the United Artists after the ex- 
piration of her contract with the Famous Players. 

By the way, Rod La Roque has just sailed for Paris to 
join Gloria's company. 

Everyone is wondering whether "Ben Hur," which has 
just been filmed in Europe, will ever pay the cost of its 
production. When Fred Niblo took Enid Bennett, Ramon 
Novarro, Carmel Meyers, and the rest of the enormous 
cast over last summer to make the picture in Rome, it was 
supposed to cost, royalties and everything, between two and 
three millions of dollars; but one hears nowadays rumors 
of costs amounting to many times the first estimate. 

Very few pictures made in California have ever reached 
the million mark. In fact, the first of the year the head of 
one picture making concern announced that in 1925 pictures 
costing no more than fifty thousand dollars would be made. 
The idea being to increase the quality and decrease the 
quantity, arguing that too much energy went into spending 
large sums of money and not enough into making really 
worthwhile pictures. 

Is this mad rush to Europe just a phase in the evolution 
of picture-making or is it a real menace to our supremacy? 
No one knows. It may be only the outcome of the constant 
demand for "something new" by the jaded public; but in 
the meantime some of our best actors and actresses are 
being missed on their native shores where they won fame 
and fortune and our good hard American dollars are being 
spent abroad. 

Pola Negri gave up her European contracts to come to 
California. True, she has not made a really s;ood picture 
since she did, but she has made money. Her lovely new 
home in Beverly Hills is mute testimony to that fact. Her 
next picture will be a ^lap stick comedy, so one has hopes, 
for as one writer expressed it, "Pola never was a queen." 

Rudolph Valentino, Charlie Chaplin, George Beban, and 
many other foreign actors were practically unknown until 
they came to California. 

* * * 

— George A. VanSmith, who is the new warden at San 
Quentin, is starting out with an idea of prison reform. 
They all do, all the best of them, and in the end they all 
yield to the old system and the thing goes on just as be- 
fore ; indeed we are lucky if it goes on no worse. Too, we 
don't put any too much faith in the good intentions of the 
new warden, but we do give him all good wishes and hopes 
for the successful carrying out of his very difficult task. 



CAFE MARQUARD 



r| 










liff^jr 



Adjoining Wilkes and Curran 

Theaters, Geary and Mason. 

Phone Prospect 61 

1925 REVUE 

Sparkling Entertainment 
DINING— DANCING 

After-Theater Suppers 
Superb Service 



Dnrliecue 
CuiU Con Came 
Coffee 




Enchiladas 

Tamales 

Drolled Steak* 



Red Bull Pit 

72 EDDY STREET, San Francisco 
JOE W. ANDERSON, Prop. Telephone Douglas 6198 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

THE MOST POPULAR RESTAURANT IN SAN FRANCISCO 
05 Post Street. Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny -1536 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners. $1.25. Meals Served a la Carte. 

Also Regular French and Ttalian Dinners. 

l-'l-ih and Game n Specialty 



BLANCO'S 



O'Fnrrell and Larkln Street* 



Phone Franklin 



No visitor should leave the city without dining: 
in the finest cafe in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.> ..... 7r.<- 

Dinner, W>fk Dny» -----._ 91.50 

Dinner. Sunday* and Holiday* ..... 91.75 



The only real artistic place in the Latin Quarter. Bohemian 

dinner. 75c — served every evening. Saturday, Sunday and 

Holidays. $1.25. Dancing from 7 to 1 every evening. 

BEGIN'S BOLOGNA RESTAURANT 
240 Columbus Avenue Phone Sutter 8825 



Tallin rVrlAB T^nn RarrArp. John Plepth. Prnps. 

NEW SHARON GRILL 

Formerly Bergez-Frank's Old Poodle Dog, Bush Street 

35 NEW MOXTC.OMEHY STREET 

Opposite Palace Hotel Phone Suffer RIMIS 




Mary Hereth Caroline Jones 

Luncheon is served from 1 1 :30 to 2 :30 

and tea from 3 to 5 



V^-te^K* 334 Sutter St. 



Douglas 7118 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

Pit Thl-d Irem, BAH mateo 



Featuring Southern Cooking" 

Open From 

11:30 a. m to 2:2n p m. 

5:30 p. m. to 8:30 p.-m. 

Sundays and Holidays 

4:30 to 8:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED F.VFRV MONDAY 
Half fllnrk f-om Hlchvrny 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 17, 1925 



EDITORIAL 

(Continued from Page 5) 

Last week we mentioned the fact 
Coast Guard Heroes that the coast guard service was to 

be used for the enforcement of the 
prohibition law. We wonder if the bulk of our readers 
have any. idea how wonderfully fine a body of men we have 
in that service, and if they grasp the actual human values 
of their work. It may not be generally known that it is 
due to the coast guard service that there have been no 
losses of ships by iceberg collision since the dreadful acci- 
dent to the Titanic. Our coast guardsmen find the ice- 
bergs, report them by wireless and destroy them by T. N. T. 
Ships seeing icebergs report the same by wireless and the 
coast guard service takes them in hand. Not only that, but 
the coastguard ships deliver mail to fishermen on the sea, 
provide medical attendance to people on ship at times ; give 
medical advice by radio to merchant ship officers who are 
worried with cases out of the normal, and perform a variety 
of social functions which are of the greatest humanitarian 
value and bring out the best in man. Not only that, but 
they assist in biological science, as appears from a note in 
the log of the Modoc which says: "While the cutter drifted 
for the night, nets were towed and samples of marine life 
were obtained. A Vertical haul was made with the plank- 
ton net to obtain specimens of sea life," and from the same 
log book we get the information: "On June 11, medical 
advice was furnished by radio to a merchant ship." There 
is a fine record which we can say, without boasting, may be 
matched but cannot be excelled by any other service any- 
where, and as a matter of fact we would not know where to 
look in order to match it. Even in the one matter of look- 
ing for and destroying derelicts, the coast guard service 
stands out preeminently as a magnificently valuable nation- 
al asset. And to set the men that are doing all this fine 
work to the task of chasing rum runners appears to be a 
waste of splendid material and very poor social economics. 



Nothing shows the improvement in 
The Return to Gold the European condition and the grad- 
ual recovery from the effects of the 
war better than the recent advance in American exchange 
and the general stoppage of inflation in European curren- 
cies. These facts have moved as eminent an authority as 
the London "Statis" to declare that the question of an in- 
ternational gold standard is "nearer than it has been at any 
other time since the Armistice." Sweden has already re- 
adopted the gold standard and today the dollar is at a 
fractional discount in Stockholm. The Canadian dollar 
is now on a parity with gold. Australian and South African 
pounds are nearer to gold than to sterling. The Swiss franc 
and the Dutch florin are at a very small discount and within 
the last few days the pound sterling has again gone up. 
An important group of countries has been brought back to 
the gold basis including those like Canada and Sweden which 
are already back in the fold and others like Poland with the gold 
zloty, and Russia with the gold ceernovetz. Latvia with the new 
gold lat, and Germany with the new gold Reichs mark. These 
are only a few instances of countries in which the new 
gold currencies have been introduced upon the basis of the 
devaluation of depreciated paper currencies. At present it 
is really only London which is keeping the world waiting 
so says the Statist for a general reversion to the inter- 
national gold standard. Countries like France, Belgium and 
Italy will by sheer force of financial gravity be compelled 
to accept devaluation of their paper currencies and it is 
only the fact that there is still a discount on the pound ster- 
ling at New York that halts the procession. The approach 
to the gold standard is rendered all the more easy from the 
fact that there has been a fall in the value of gold of about 
ten per cent as expressed in rising prices in this country. 
So far the decline in the value of gold is helpful rather than 
the contrary but there is a question as to how far it will go. 



The' New Richmond Ferry System 

Business and passenger traffic always follow the lines 
of least resistance and that is the reason why an almost 
immediate improvement is made manifest when better 
means of communication are provided between widely 
separated communities. San Francisco has been said, in 
the past, to be surrounded by a Chinese Wall and that this 
wall should be torn down by the building of bridges and 
the inauguration of new ferry systems. Bridges have been 
built and are even now designed to be built in the near 
future, but the building of such gigantic structures is a 
very slow process comparatively. The new ferry system 
of the Southern Pacific Company will make possible a much 
more rapid transit than is now available to the motorists 
to reach those parts of the State most easily accessible from 
Richmond. 

In announcing this yesterday J. H. R. Parsons, passenger 
traffic manager for the Southern Pacific Company, stated 
that the new ferry steamer "New Orleans" will be placed 
in service between the two bay cities. 

The "New Orleans" is one of the new ferryboats recently 
constructed for the railroad by Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation. It has a capacity for 75 machines and will 
make the trip across the bay in 40 minutes. On week days 
the new ferry steamer will make eight trips each way across 
the Bay; the first boat leaving San Francisco at 6:20 a.m. 
and Richmond at 7:10 a.m. On Sundays and holidays the 
first boat will leave San Francisco at 7:00. a.m. and Rich- 
mond at 8:00 a.m. The service will be maintained until 
midnight. 

San Francisco. Richmond and points in the Sacramento, 
San Joaquin and Napa Valleys, will greatly benefit by the 
new Richmond ferry service. The "New Orleans" is ideally 
suited to handle vehicular traffic across San Francisco Bay. 
Everything possible for the convenience of passengers has 
been incorporated into the new steamer. 

Richmond itself will profit greatly through the new 
ferry line and it will only be a short time, in the opinion 
of transportation people, when they will run to capacity. 

The country tributary to San Francisco through the oper- 
ation of the new ferry system consists of some of the most 
productive and rich counties around the bay. Contra Costa 
County is one of the richest sections of the State as re- 
gards the production of grapes, apricots and peaches, while 
its grazing lands are rich in pasturage and the farmers of 
the country arc among the wealthiest. 

The opening function occured on the fourteenth of Jan- 
uary and was enthusiastically attended by the people of 
Richmond and San Francisco and invited guests. 



A Noisy Affair 

A dear old lady from the country traveled to London to 
see her married daughter, and returned with stories of her 
wonderful experiences. 

London was enveloped in fog during the first two or three 
days of her visit, and as her bedroom looked out upon the 
railway she was troubled by the fog signals. She came 
down to breakfast after her first restless night and required 
the cause of the strange banging she had heard so often 
during the hours of darkness. 

"Oh, that was the fog," explained her son-in-law. 

Her visit over, she returned to the country, full of the 
wonderful sights and sounds of London life. 

Did you see a Lonnen fog, granny?" asked one of her 
listeners. 

"Aye, that I did," replied granny; "and I heard 'un, too!" 

"Heard 'un, granny?" exclaimed another listener. "How 
didst hear a fog?" 

"Why," was the reply, "Lonnen fog hain't like ours. 
Every now and then it goes off wi' a rare bang." 



January 17, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



Bits of Unwritten History 

By Edward S. Spring 



(Author's Note: This is a collection of odds and ends — queer say- 
ings and doings in the local financial district and the mining fields, — 
that came to the writer's attention during many years past, and, so 
far as he knows, none of them have been hitherto published.) 

CHAPTER XIX 
"Old Yank" of Lake Tahoe 

IT'S a far cry from San Francisco's financial district to 
the shores of beautiful Lake Tahoe. But, when the 
writer began to spend his summer vacations at Tallac on 
the lake, in the '80s, he found so many local banking and 
stock people quartered there that it seemed like being back 
in the bustle of California, Pine, Montgomery and Sansome 
streets. It afterward became quite "the thing" among this 
class of folks, to build and occupy summer homes on the 
lake. None appreciated the charm of vacation life there 
more than the late I. W. Hellman, president of the Wells 
Fargo Nevada National Bank and, in some years, his visits 
were prolonged far beyond the month's allotted time. 

Under cover of the above remarks, the writer will now 
introduce a queer inhabitant of Lake Tahoe's shores, who 
quickly made himself known to newcomers and amused 
everybody with his eccentricities. This was old "Yank" 
Clement. In the '49 times, Clement and his wife kept a 
tavern on the Placerville road and made a nice amount of 
money. They came to Lake Tahoe and bought a short 
stretch of the shore, with quite a deep backing, including a 
grove of grand old tamarac trees, immediately adjoining 
"Lucky" Baldwin's big estate, on which he erected the 
Hotel Tallac. Baldwin vainly tried to buy the Clements 
property, and so did another rich man, who owned a large 
lot on the other side of them, for the "improvements" which 
old "Yank" put on his land did not add to the beauty of 
the spot. These improvements consisted mainly of a 
rickety two-story unpainted shanty, put up by "Yank" 
himself. There was a shallow cellar underneath, over the 
door of which was a sign bearing the significant word, "Bar." 
A shingle nailed to one of the corners of the house read : 
"Hotel. Boarders Wanted." 

Were "Yank" Clement and his wife alive in these days, 
they could make a big fortune in the movies, which are 
always after "types" of their kind. No one appeared to 
know how old they were. "Yank" owned up to one hun- 
dred and five years, and, pointing to the old lady, would 
say: "She came over in the Mayflower, so you can guess 
how old she is." 

Dwellers in the mountains surrounding the lake gave 
Mrs. Clement a good name. They said she understood tin- 
virtues of all kinds of herbs and was well versed in the art 
of healing and would tramp twenty miles, if necessary, to 
reach and cure anyone she heard was sick. Try as hard 
as they could, they did not get any boarders for their 
"hotel." for appearances were against it. How "Yank" 
worked the "bar" is told further along. He felt very bitter 
against Baldwin and his neighbor on the other side. who. 
he said, were trying to "freeze him out" and would not give 
him right of way through their land, forcing him to wade 
around in the water to reach the wharf at Tallac. 

"Yank was never known to have worn a hat. He had a 
great shock of tousled hair, that originally may have been 
white, hut w.is now dirty and full of dry leaves and twigs, 
and so was his long, bushy beard. Leaning across his 
fence, he shamelessly confessed to the writer that he had 
never taken a bath hut once in his life. and. he explained: 
"That was when I fell in the lake and could not help it. 
It nearly killed me." 

"These are grand old trees. 'Yank,' " said the writer. 
pointing to the towering tamaracs, centuries old. 



"Guess they are. I'm proud of 'em, for I set 'em all out 
myself. 

This was amazing, but more astonishment came when 
Yank invited his new acquaintance to visit the "hotel." 
Climbing the fence, the writer was led to the "bar" in the 
cellar, where a plank across two saw-horses served as a 
counter. "Yank" went into a corner and produced a gallon 
demijohn and two glasses, which he filled to the brim with 
the liquor. 

"There's something that will make your hair curl," said 
the old man with much pride. 

As "Yank" turned to put the demijohn back in the corner 
tie writer lifted one of the glasses and had a whiff of some- 
thing that smelled like spirits of turpentine. He quickly 
poured the stuff on the ground, covered the glass with his 
hand and pretended to have drained the last drop, when his 
host again faced him and emptied his own glass with one 
gulp. 

"How does that strike you?" asked "Yank," smacking his 

lips. 

"That's great stuff. I've never seen its equal before " 
"Well, it ought to be great stuff," said "Yank." "It cost 

me 75 cents a gallon in Sacramento." 
* * * 

"Yank" and his worthy wife put up a hard fight to retain 
their land and the tamarac grove and the hotel and all that 
went with the outfit, but, in the end, the "bloated capital- 
ists" came out on top, as they usually do. 

Stuff That "Takes Right Hold" 

Writing about liquor with a "kick in it" and that "takes 
right hold," like the stuff that old "Yank" said he paid 75 
cents a gallon for, in Sacramento, reminds one of what the 
late E. A. Fargo (related to the great express people), and 
who was in the liquor business here for many years, once 
said : 

"Miners, teamsters and other hard working people up in 
the mountains and laborers on the river steamers and 
ranches will not touch liquor that does not bite." 

And then Fargo went down into his basement and showed a 
row of eighteen barrels of whiskey. "Starting at this end," he 
said: "Here is our finest, oldest and smoothest whiskey. The 
price is $12 to $15 a gallon and, as we go along the row of bar- 
rel-, the liquor gets poorer and cheaper, but more fiery, until 
it would take a throat and stomach of cast iron to retain the 
stuff in the last barrel on that end, the price of wdiich is 85 
cents a gallon." 

"We had a buyer here from French Corral," continued 
Fargo, "and he wanted our best whiskey and was willing to 
pay $12 a gallon for it. As a joke, we gave him a sample of 
the best, smooth whiskey and told him the price was 85 cents. 
But it seemed tasteless and he would have none of it, and as 
we went along sampling and as the whiskey got poorer and the 
price became higher the man's face brightened and when we 
reached the 85 cent stuff he said: 'That's the right taste — that's 
the real $12 whiskey, dive me a barrel of it.' " 

"We let him into the joke and lost a good customer," said 
Fargo. (To be continued) 



The January fuK SALt at Gassner's 

GASSNER STANDARDS very definitely estab- 
lish the exceptional importance of this occasion. 
All the Gassner Furs included — all the fur 
.oats, all the fur wraps, all the fur jacquettes, all the 
fur neckpieces. 

Reductions to SO' , 

LOUIS GASSNER 

Incorporated 

112-114 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

"The new store that is 32 years old" 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 17, 1925 



FINANCIAL 

(Continued from Page 11) 

—The Community Chest people ask me to say a word 
for them, to help them in their campaign for 1925. I have 
heard little against their past work, much that does them 
credit. Like many others, I think it is bit of a close cor- 
poration, in that many deserving charities are excluded 
from its beneficent support. But then, how many of its 
critics know anything really of the societies excluded, or of 
the reasons? I do not like the way employes of big cor- 
porations are practically forced to contribute, because in 
many cases they cannot afford to (for reasons that they 
cannot e? plain to everyone). But the pressure cannot be 
"blamed on" the Chest. And, when all is said, the idea is 
good, and we are not supporting it as we should. 

* * * 

— No one will be sorry to hear the good news put out by 
Thomas Magee & Sons concerning real estate transactions 
in San Francisco. I can never hear too much about home 
building, too little about rabbit-hutch erections. Be that 
as it may, building investments in any of our larger cities 
are safe enough, if under experienced management. Build- 
ing bonds show fine yields, and are as a rule well seemed. 
Their popularity will increase every year. 

* * * 

— We are going to be well treated in the matter of oil 
stations. The General Petroleum Company is following in 
the footsteps of Pan-American, with a million dollar bank 
roll to support its enthusiasm. That the company's move 
has the element of permanency, is evidenced by its having 
arranged for a fleet of tank trucks to bring the oil from 
the south, and for the construction of steel storage tanks of 
200,000 barrel capacity. Warehouses, garages, shops, etc., 
are included in the plan of operation. All this means com- 
petitive service, but do not look for lower prices. The mar- 
ket position does not warrant any such expectation. 

* * * 

— A big increase in passenger traffic from the East and 
Middle West is expected by the officials of the Southern 
Pacific Company. It was below normal in 1924, but a 
larger proportion of those who came to look remained to 
thank their stars that they had taken the peep. As many 
as 5076 refunds on unused portions of tickets were issued 
during the last six months of last year. Let them all 
come — except the Chicago bees. 

* * * 

— "Why a laborer's wage of $6.00?" is asked. The refer- 
ence being to the liberality of our Supervisors. I express 
no opinion, not being a municipal laborer — if there is such 
a thing, correctly so described. But when the opponents 
of the increased pay tell me that a daily wage of $5 50 is 
10 per cent in excess, of the rate fixed for skilled labor in 
private employment, I rub my eyes. Under what classifi- 
cation does a bricklayer come? Mechanic? Unless the 
suggestion is that he is skilled, but not a laborer, though 
non-municipal. 

* * * 

— Hunter, Dulin & Co., of 256 Montgomery Street, offer 
a carefully selected list of "Considered Investments." If 
more of us considered there would be complaining. Also, 
if more personal modesty guided our investments, there 
would be fewer blunders. We have skilled advice at our 
elbows, why be out of elbows after a lot of self-sacrifice in 
savings? Because we think we know. 



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Some think thnt n vlgjorou* brushing; once or twice a day In 
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"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

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Phone Gnrflcld 33S 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions Crowns; Self Cleaning; Bridges. 

Porcelain Work nnd Roofless Plates 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED AND GREASED 

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Rate*, 35c per day; 97.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floor* for Service and Storng;e of Automobiles 



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Phone Garfield 5364 



January 17, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



19 




TownMLCrier 



i WHO THE DEVILART THOU 

'ONE THAT WILL PLAY THE 
} pEVIL.Sm WITH YOU" 

— Shakspeare. 



A MERCHANT on upper Sutter 
street called my attention to a 
young girl entering the machine of a 
stranger. He explained to me that the 
automobilist had been following the girl 
for over a block persuading her to take 
a ride. 

"Now," said my friend, "that young 
woman doesn't know whether she is 
going home or not, and I wish she had 
called to me for help. I should like to 
have landed into that fellow. But what 
can one do in a case of that kind ?" As I 
left him, he said, "It makes a man afraid 
to raise a family." 

* * * 

— She was rather proper herself, but 
thought she liked the he-man idea, — a 
man fashioned in the most he-masculine 
style that is dear to the heart of a gco.lly 
portion of feminine writers. She showed 
me a story she wrote herself about the 
kind of a woman she evidently thought 
was her kind, and my heart echoed with 
a cynical laugh-beat. 

I sometimes think that civilization has 
developed a manlier type than the cave- 
man at least, and I read with thrilling 
interest that according to Professor 
George L. Collie the "cave-man" theory 
of murderous love-making is about as 
solid as stewed minced apples. Professor 
Collie, who is of Beloit College, says that 
the he-man of the cave to be sure to get 
the girl of his eye, instead of hitting on 
the head with a club to drag her to his 
domicile, coaxed her there by mincing 
means, and flattered her, and strung 
her beads. We think, by the way, that 
the cave-woman was some husky herself, 
and can imagine what she might have 
done with that same club when she re- 
gained consciousness from its contact, 
her head still throbbing, and while her 
supposed lord and master was snoring 
like the meat-eater he was. 

* * * 

— "S. F. Men Will Avenge Death." 
That is a pretty title a newspaper is com- 
pelled to print to indicate the sate of 
affairs locally reached between the pro- 
hibition agents and those who refuse to 
be prohibited. Of course we are talking of 
liquor. What other object denied to the 
citizens by law or action restrained by it. 
has brought opposing forces in contact 
where guns are mounted, ships sunk and 
men killed? 

* * * 

— We belong to no cult, and have no 
spiritualistic fad, but we wonder why we 
hear of a case on good authority of a 
woman screaming when her son is mur- 
dered three thousand miles away in a 
foreign land, and should an article, ap- 



parently truthful, appear in a local news- 
paper telling of a man who turned back 
in the city because he felt his wife was 
in danger, thus saving her from being 
overcome by escaping gas? If such 
things are, why laugh at Sir Conan Doyle 
and Sir Oliver Lodge and the late Henry 
James? Many have grown to believe 
in telepathic thought, but reject any kind 
of spiritualis'.ic theory. In the two there 
is something akin. 



— We only know this life, most of us, 
and they who are with us and claim 
knowledge of ano.her, may have a hap- 
piness we cannot comprehend. That is, 
perhaps, why we do not believe them, 
and cannot understand. 

* * * 

— The jury found Kid McCoy guilty of 
manslaughter in the case of the death of 
Mrs. Mors with whom he was intimate, 
and the judge sentenced him to a possible 
one year's imprisonment ; in other words, 
from one to ten. To the writer it looks 
very little. Was there a lingering doubt 
in the judge's mind ? We ask the ques- 
tion cautiously, because the trial is over; 
and the judge is the judge, but the sen- 
tence does seem very little, especially on 
a man who shot at two or three people at 
the time of Mrs. Mors' death. 

* * * 

— It always seems to us that where an 
opera singer is paid from $1000 to $2500 
for two or three nights' work, there 
should be some leeway in the finances in- 
volved to pay some hing to members of 
the chorus. Sometimes they are paid 
and sometimes not, but an operatic star 
w ill often hold up the curtain, or try to do 
so, unless handed in advance his small 
fortune. 

* * * 

More bluejackets' lives snuffed out 
by another explosion ! Surely in our 
Navy is exemplified the aphorism par- 
aphrased : Peace hath her victims more 
than war. 





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20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 17, 1925 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller 
National Automobile Club 

Motor Car Thieves 

'f TT is when the shoe pinches us that 
-"■ we are most concerned," recen ly 
declared a prominent detective who has 
a great deal to do with apprehending 
motor car thieves. This statement was 
made in commencing upon the number 
of automobile thefts daily occu ring 
throughout the country. 

"Americans are not a selfish race, but 
are apt to be thoughtless by nature," 
he said. "When we rely too long upon 
'George doing it,' George generally be- 
comes tired and falls down on the job. 
Laws can be made by legislatuies and 
brilliant legal minds, but the enforce- 
ment of these laws rests with the con- 
scientious support and co-operation 
they are given by 'Mr. Eve.y-day Citi- 
zen.' " 

The problem of motor car thefts i- 
like all other similar ones, a mat.er of 
public interest. Mr. Citizen is ver^ 
apt to be apathetical towards his neigh- 
bor's car being stolen, but let him find 
his car amongst the missing and it is 
an entirely different story. It is a 
known fact that outside of the amateur 
car thief theie are organized groups 
of motor car thieves operating through- 
out the country. The cleverness and 
skill of these bands of ou.laws is so 
ingenious that the most brilliant minds 
in the Police Departments are needed 
to cope with them. It is for these 
organized gangs that the Theft Details 
are at present spreading their nets. 
Already the meshes of this fine net 
which extends over eleven Western 
states, have entangled some of the 
shrewdest ciiminals in the country. 
But to accomplish this work in a 
speedy manner, the co-operation and 
assistance of the public is essential. 



This help which the individual car 
owner may give comes mostly in the 
form of following just plain horse 
sense in matters pertaining to his car. 
Many of the present t.affic rules which 
seem unnecessary to the average per- 
son are laws which were adopted for 
the pu pose of preventing the theft of 
cars or accessories on cars. The fol- 
lowing are a few simple suggestions 
which would greatly assist in lessening 
such thefts : 

Don't park your car in out-of-the- 
way places. Don't leave the keys in 
your car. Always secure your car with 
eithe' an ignition lock, or tire lock be- 
fore leaving it. Report immediately to 
the polite when you rent your private 
garage to any outsider as stolen cars 
are often altered in private garages to 
confuse identity. Always keep a mem- 
orandum of you " car's license and mo- 
tor numbers and any particular mark 
of identification. Keep your license 
registration certificate in your car and 
last, but not least, if your car is stolen, 
report immediately to the nearest 
police station, giving them intelligent 
informa'ion, and not a confused state- 
ment of mere surmises." 



The e is no approved spotlight list 
authorized by the Motor Vehicle De- 
partment. This was the statement 
made by Inspector Harder of the State 
Mo'.or Vehicle Department to a repre- 
sentative of the National Automobile 
Club last week. All spotlights "are 
approved" provided they conform to 
Section 10SA and Section 108B of the 
State Motor Vehicle Act. 

The first defines the term spotlight 
as any light, the rays of which are pro- 
jected fo ward, other than headlights 
and sidelights. 

The law governing the use of such 
devices is as follows: 

All spotlights used on motor vehicles 
shall be affixed to such vehicles in such 
a manner that the centers thereof shall 
be not less than fifty nor more than 
seventy-two inches above the level sur- 
face upon which the vehicle stands, 
and shall be so constructed and ar- 
ranged that no portion of the main 
substantially parallel beam of light 
when measured one hund.ed feet or 
more ahead of said lights, shall rise of 
shall be capable of being raised from 
the front seat to more than forty-two 
inches above the level surface of the 
highway upon which the vehicle 
stands, directly ahead of such vehicle. 
The provisions of this subsection shall 
not apply to police or fire department 
vehicles. 

According to Inspector Harde-, ths 
use of the ipotlight is so definitely set 
forth in the Motor Vehicle Law that it 
is unnecessary for the Motor Vehicle 



Department to test any such devices, 
and the corps of Inspectors will only 
occupy themselves in checking up the 
use of these devices to ascertain 
whether they are being employed 
strictly in accord with the law or not. 
If they are so employed, there is no 
danger of any glare and there is no 
necessity of issuing any prescribed list 
of approved devices. 

The following telegram was sent out 
by the State Motor Vehicle Depart- 
ment in regard to the use of spotlights 
on motor vehicles : 

"Any spotlight that complies 
with Section 108 complies with 
law. Laboratory test not required. 
Laboratory test has been made at 
request of several manufacturers 
but this was for advertising pur- 
poses only. 

(Signed) 
Division of Motor Vehicles." 



General Auto Body Repairing 
Stationary Top General Trimming- 
Telephone Mnrket 1835 

Tom Meek 

Auto Body Building 

Company 

710 GOLUEX GATE AVENUE 
San FranclNCO, Cal. 

Radiator and Fender Repairing 
THOS. J. MEEK 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 

Wilson Bros. Co. 

Incorporated 

1G20-30 MARKET STREET 

Bet. Frnnklln nnd Gough 

Telephone Park 271 



January 17, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



21 







Captain Shotover, in "Heartbreak House," says he has at- 
tained the "Seventh Degree of Concentration." Not one man 
in a million attains the First Degree of Concentration. A bul- 
let goes farther than a pound of buckshot. The secret of suc- 
cess is concentration. A perfect sonnet is concentrated poetry. 
A diamond is concentrated coal. If you want to get on, you 
ought to focus your energy on one aim, not on twenty. Versa- 
tility is a curse for the artist as well as for the business man. 
You cannot be everywhere and do everything. Be one thing 
and do one thing thoroughly. The man who can do one thing 
well has attained the First Degree of Concentration. 

"Our new cook always boils my eggs hard." 
"Lucky man! We can never get one to stay that long!" — 
— Kasper (Stockholm). 

It happened in a Baltimore market. "What." said a 
woman customer of one dealer, "is the price of these chickens?" 
"A dollar and a quarter apiece, ma'am," replied the dealer. 
"Did you raise them yourself?" asked the lady. 
"Oh, yes, ma'am. They was only a dollar ten last week," 

was the reply. 

* * * 

"I say, Gadsby," said Mr. Smith, entering the fishmonger's 
shop with a lot of tackle in his hand, "I want some fish to 
take home. Put them up to look as if they'd been caught to- 
day, will you?" 

"Certainly, sir. Flow many?" 

"Oh, you'd be'ter give me three or four — mackerel. Make 
it look decent in quantity without appearing to exaggerate, you 
know." 

"Yes, sir. You'd better take salmon, though." 

"Why? What makes you think so " 

"Oh, nothing except that your wife was here early this 
morning and said if you dropped in wi'h your fishing-tackle 1 
was to persuade you to take salmon, if possible, as she liked 

that best." 

* * * 

"When you refused him my hand did he fall on' his knees. 
papa ?" 
"I didn't notice where he fell !" — Karikaturcn i Christiania I, 

* * * 

cold in brother's room at college." 



The Old Dear — "Yes, we've been married goin' on forty 
years, an' my husband has never received me once 1" 

The Dear — "My, isn't that wonderful!" 

"Yes, isn't it? I can tell when he's lying — every time." — 
Sydney Bulletin (Australia). 

* * * 

"When my wife starts to scold I go for a walk!" 
"Indeed! The shoemaker told me you arc one of his best 
customers!" — Dcr Brummer (Berlin). 



"It must be awful 
"Why so?" 

"He writes that his roommate just slipped in with a 
o' Lantern. 

• * * 



ikate 



on." — Dartmouth Jack 



"Do you speak French ?" 
"No." 

"Do you speak English?" 
"No." 

"But on your window it says 'French and English spoken 
here.' Who speaks it ?" 
"The customers!" — Strix (Stockholm). 

* * * 

Tom's wife was commenting upon a love passage in the 
novel she was reading. 

"Were you embarrassed when you proposed to me. dear:" 
she inquired. 

"Yes, darling." replied her husband. "I owed over £300!" 
— Weekly Telegraph (London - ). 

* * * 

Rhyme and Reason — A little kissing now and then is why 
we have the married men! — Pearson's Weekly. 



New President for Down-Towners 

F. W. Milburn was elected last Tuesday by the directors 
of the Down-Town Association as president of their organiza- 
tion for the ensuing twelve months, to take the place of J. M. 
Kepner, the latter having held the chairmanship for three 
years. The o'.her members of the board are : Horace H. Allen, 
John Breuner Jr., B. C. Brown, Frank E. Carroll, Thomas J. 
Coleman, Richard W. Costello, Tom Dillon, J. F. Douglas, 
W. D. Fennimore, Marshal Hale, J. M. Kepner, Frank W. 
Marston, Byron Maijzy, Andrew G. McCarthy, Angelo J. 
Rossi, E. V. Saunders. Max Sommers, James A. Sorensen, 
Harvey M. Toy, Frank I. Turner, John I. Walter and Fred- 
erick A. Wilson. Joseph M. dimming remains as executive 
secretary, Edgar D. Peixotto as attorney and James C. Craw- 
ford as publicity director. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE 

The Mineral Development Company, Location of Principal Place of 

Business, Snn Francisco, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a regular meeting of the directors 
held on the 13th day of January. 1 i J l; .'> . an assessment of one-half cent 
per Share was levied upon the issued capital stock of the corporation. 
payable immediately in legal money of the United States, to the Sec- 
retary, at the office of the Company, Room No. 237 Monadnock Build- 
ing. San Francisco, California. 

Any stock on which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 20th 
day of February, 1925, will lie delinquent and advertised for sale at 
public auction, and unless payment is made before will he sold on 
Friday, tin- 20th day of March. 1925, to pay the delinquent assessment, 
together with msis of advertising and expense of sale. 

M. .1. SEELT Secretary, 
_M, Monadnoi k Building;, San Francisco. California, 



"The World's 
Most Beautiful" 

Showing the Fairest daughters of many lands, is an 
attractive page in Sunday's rotagravure section. There 
>i unusual pictures taken "Abroad," and 
some out of iin ordinal 1 ] scenes taken "Afloat and 
Ashore." 



"Picturesque 
Visitors 

At the White House.' shows an even dozen notables 
from various lands: there are some interesting scenes 
from "The Woolly West." some styles for the ladies, and 
a delightful front page. "The Masquerader." Don't miss 
The 



Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 17, 1925 




'the better it gets- 



£?jiLLi.-iia$ 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 

1,800,000 caps were served at the Pan- 
ama Pacific International Exposition 



DUCO 

LACQUER 
Everluster Auto Enameling Co. 

BEAUTY AND DURABILITY 

Not affected by exposure. We guar- 
antee every one of our jobs. 

Phone Franklin 2775 
946 Bush Street San Francisco 



ielands 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from Page 13) 

New York's or San Francisco's smartest 
hostelry, while the shining floor of the 
ballroom makes you want to dance. 
When contemplating a trip across the 
briny "pond," secure some of these pam- 
phlets, and an'icipa'e and enjoy before- 
hand some of the features of a journey 
on one of the "Royal Mail" steamers. 



Cameo 

Burns Brothers' Memphis Minstrel, 
an organization of 30 colored perform- 
ers, is heading the stage presentation 
this week at the Cameo. The min- 
strels opened a week's engagement 
Saturday in conjunction with the pic- 
ture feature Buck Jones in "The Des- 
ert Outlaw." 

The colored minstrels are a complete 
modern organization, and with their 
Creole Beauty Chorus, present as one 
episode a minstrel revue. Willie Wil- 
liams, a dancer, The Dixie Four, a 
quartet of male voices; "Skating" 
George Green, Claude Burns and Ed 
Lancaster are also prominent in the 
cast. They carry their own minstrel 
band, which not only appears on the 
stage, but gives typical Southern airs 
in front of the theater each day. 

"The Desert Law" is a fast moving 
Western story. It tells of a young 
prospector who saves the life of an 
outlaw, brother, of the girl he loves, 
and gets into trouble himself by the 
act. An exciting scene in the picture 
is when Buck, handcuffed, escaping 
from a posse, leaps from his flying 
horse to a fast moving train. Evelyn 
Brent plays opposite Jones and other 
members of the cast have been well 
selected. 



Warfield 

George Beban, perhaps the world's 
foremost delineator of Italian charac- 
ter on both the stage and screen, comes 
back to this city Saturday as the star of 
the film. "The Greatest Love of All," 
at the head of his company, and enacts 
a bit of the play on the stage. Loew's- 
Warfield will house this attraction be- 
ginning today. 

This same method of entertaining 
an audience — that of showing a com- 
pany on the screen and then having 
them on the stage speaking their parts, 
was done by Beban and his company 
several seasons ago with great success. 
This time he has a company of 24 play- 
ers, all of them from the original film 
cast. A court room sequence of the 
storv will be done on the stage of the 
Warfield. 

Added to this will be the usual lib- 
eral quota of short films, a concert by 
the music masters under Seven's lead- 
ership, and another flashing Idea 
staged by Fanchon. 



Tel. Prospert 6979 



H.& S. 

GARAGE 



639 Turk Street 
San Francisco, Calif. 



% 



The above firm means lots to the auto- 
mobile owners. For a small monthly 
payment they take all your automo- 
bile worries away from you. Your car 
is kept in first-class mechanical condi- 
tion. It's greased and oiled. It's towed 
in San Francisco free of charge. Re- 
placement of parts up to $50 free, in 
case of damage by collision. 10 per 
cent discount on oils and greases and 
gasoline. Automobiles washed for 
$1.50. And other features. 

Investigate, or phone for 
representative 



*«*!*% 




.PIONEER 



The 
Name I 

on a box of office 
stationery* whe- 
ther ft be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete sa t i s fac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
i -»_i-j-'t^' -*^ printer or sta- 

mivu^iud^.TT^ir ^«-,v m ^; how 
BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
41 First Street, San Francisco 



Mail Advertising 
Specialists 

ACCURATE AND PROMPT 
SERVICE 

Andrews-Breeding Company 

Sutter 6224 

Room 801 G Uette Building 

830 MARKET STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Time 




Card 



THE DEPENDABLE AUTOMOBILE FERRY Route offer* 
motorists the shortest and most direct means of transporta- 
tion from Oakland, San Francisco, and nil points south, to 
Vallejo, Sacramento, Sonoma, Napa and Lake Counties and 
all points north. 



Leave Oakland 


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•Snturdaya. Sundays. Holidays — Extra Trips During Heavy 
Traffic. ISundays and Holidays only. 

ATEJI J. H.VNFORD, Pres. and Gen. Met. 



/$AV* 



fc 



[COOKS] 



TICKETS ISSUED 

To All 

PARTS OF THE WORLD 

INCLUSIVE INDEPENDENT TOURS 
ITINERARIES FURNISHED 

CRUISES SUPREME 



MEDITERRANEAN 
Leaving New York January 24, 

ROUND THE WORLD 
Leaving New York January 22, 

Write for Booklets 



1925 



1925 



, 128 Sutter Street 



San Francisco 



i. 



MacRORIE-McLAREN company 



Landscape 
Engineers 



General 

Nurserymen 




California 
Garden Specia lists 



Phone 
Douglas 4442 

3oiPhelanBldg.,S.F. 




/OEPORTS from all parts of the 
J[ J country indicate that the new 
/ De Luxe Sedans are enjoying 
I the most enthusiastic reception 
any Chandler has ever received 
during its twelve years of success- 
ful achievement. 





Today's 

AN 




R 



possesses 

every conceivable feature 
any motorist could desire. 



CHANDLER-CLEVELAND MOTOR CAR CO. 

Van Ne»« at Sacramento — Prospect 6700 
Hebrank-Hunter & Peacock Co., 3020 Broadway, Oakland 



OPEN SUNDAYS 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



California Advertiser 



$5.00 PER YEAR 



SATURDAY, JANUARY 24, 1925 



LOS ANGELES 







Coll.cn Mttre and her husband, John McC*rmack 
CtlUen will star in Edna Ftrber'i "St Big," aming to Luw's Warfield this Saturday. 



/chJpA (j7i?y~ 




^deJJne 



A Galaxy of Mack Senneti Stars 




Eltabllihtd July 20, 1«KS 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1866, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

Jr., from 1884 to 1925. Is now printed and published by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 235 Montgomery St., San Francisco, California. Telephone 

Douglas 6S53. Entered at San Francisco. California, Post Office as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, 10, C. London, 

Fngiand. Subscription Rates (including- postage), one year. $5.00. Foreign, one year. $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00, 



Vol. CVI 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF., SATURDAY, JANUARY 24, 1925 



No. 4 



— Very seldom do both sides of a record appeal to us. 

* * * 

— The cork on a fishing line dances around and attracts a 
lot of attention, but it is the hook that is doing the work. 



— That an employment agency can function efficiently 
and profitably on a 10 per cent basis, has been proved con- 
clusively by a certain firm here in San Francisco; realizing 
this, it seems an unnecessary hardship to burden working- 
girls with, when an agency demands a third of the first 
month's salary. 



— Japan signs treaty of recognition with Russia. \Ye can 
read much significance into that fact. 



— "Education is good behavior to the young, comfort to 
the old, riches to the poor, and decoration to the rich." 
— Diogenes. 

* * * 

— Emerson advised us that "The true test of civilization 
is not the census, nor the size of cities, nor the crops; no, 
but the kind of man the country turns out." 



— When circumstances appear as too montrous fur us to 
contend with, and the future appalls us. it is comforting to 
remember what Plato said: "Combat is beautiful and hope 

is great." 

* * * 

— Listening to the orchestra at the Fairmont last Sunday 
evening, and looking around at the absorbed audience, their 
faces keenly alive to the beauty of the music, we thought: 
"Thank Heaven, the whole world is not jazz mad." 

* * * 

— To ignore the power of gold in the present organization 
of the world would be folly, like failing to recognize the 
power of the elements in nature, but man. a superior being, 
ought to be able to dominate it, use it and never let himsell 
become subjugated by it. 

* * * 

—Hear what Luis II. Debayle says on evil speaking: 
"When vou hear, 'they say that they say.' ask. rather: 
'What is it that they do not say?'. . .Calumny is the miasma 
of the social swamp. . . The evil speaker is an evil do 

germ." 

* * * 

— In a recent speech to the American Society of Newspaper 
Editors, President Coolidge stated that the ideals of American 
newspapers are high, that the) lead 'be world— that their 
success bes in avoiding propaganda— that there is no such 
thing as the influence of the "Capitalistic pro-." etc.. etc.. 
and much more fulsome praise. Well— well— even it these 
■ statements have to be taken with a pinch of salt, we believe 
that occasional praise is a valuable thing and tends to create 
a desire on the part of the recipient to live up to the stand- 
ards set forth. 



— Much adverse criticism has been aroused in motoring circles 
regarding the proposed raise of taxes on gasoline to 20 per 
cent of the retail price. The present tax is 12j/> per cent of 
the value of the commodity sold. A little reasoning will show 
the motorist who considers himself over-taxed that the up- 
keep of roads means the up-keep of his machine, for bad roads 
mean the rapid deterioration of an automobile. 



— To quote the English Times: "Facts which none dispute 
have convinced the Government- of the United States, against 
its will, that the exis hiL; regime in Russia is based upon the 
negation of every principle of honor and good faith, and every 
usage and convention underlying the whole structure of inter- 
national law, thai is. to the negation, in short, of every principle 
upon which it is possible to base harmonious and trustful re- 
lations, whether of nations or of individuals." 



— So it is decided that the old U. S. A. cannot elevate its 
own battleship guns. More European arbitration. Well, we 
might be suffering a few qualms of apprehension over all this 
handicapping and handcuffing of Uncle Sam. except that history 
tells us. whether elevated or not, "its the man behind the gun 
that <}oe^ the work," an 1 tin- American "gob" has yel to 
be beaten. 



— In ihe recent matricide that has shocked the whole com- 
munity an 1 to which the daily press ha- devoted page upon 
p ge of space, there may he extenuating circumstances which 
arc unknown to the public, or even unrealized by the girl 
criminal herself. Often the fact that a child is not wanted 
serves to react against the mother and brings about an ab- 
normal hatred which the child it-elf cannot understand. 



— If your affairs of life seem to he inexplicably mixed, and 
there is no loop-hole of escape from various disagreeable 
business duties that stare you in the face, and an impenetrable 
wall seems to he between you and the future, take a stroll 
around the water's edge to Land's End, and standing mi the 
cliffs by the sea. steep your tired vision in the gray-green 
waves and the blue-green Marin hills beyond, attune your 
Fagged pulses to the throbbing of the tides, face the breeze 
with a cheerful countenance and your perplexities will drop 
from your consciousness like a smothering and unnecessary 
cloak from your shoulders. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 24, 1925 




We have always taken the position that 
Back to Unity an economic unity, once achieved, is a 

matter of great moment and that any at- 
tempts to destroy that unity and to break it up again into 
its component parts is a step to the rear and a reactionary 
move. We always consider that the expression of the 
famous J. Pierpont Morgan that one cannot unscramble 
eggs was a very wise and unassailable statement of a fact 
which mere political demagogues are very apt to ignore. So 
we considered, always, that the breaking up of the Austrian 
Empire into congeries of small states was a great mistake 
which could not fail to throw Europe backwards. The 
"Succession State-;," as they are called, are now beginning 
to see that they cannot exist as separate entities, but 
that they are really parts of one system. They have 
begun to talk about economic union and in this they are 
eloquently aided by the London Times and the Paris 
Temps, it might be carping to say that these papers 
might have been sagacious enough six years ago to have 
seen where the separatist tendencies would lead. Now it 
seems to lie evident that these nations must have economic 
union, and, if economic, why not political? Indeed the 
one is the correlative of the other. They cannot exist 
apart. As one authority puts it : "To break up a natural 
economic unit like the Austro-IIungarian monarchy was 
such a unique, extraordinary and fantastic piece of politi- 
cal malpractice as to be explainable only by the atmosphere 
of blind passion and still blinder ignorance in which it was 
committed but nature has its own way of healing wounds 
and rest and quiet will restore damages inflicted by acci- 
dent or recklessness. So, also, political mistakes foolishly 
and ignorantly committed in times of war are corrected in 
times of peace. We may hope therefore that if the peace 
of Europe is maintained for some time, there will be a 
general tendency to remedy the errors of the unfortunate 
Treaty, particularly in view of the movement towards a 
United States of Europe. 



and progressive peoples are engaged in a friendly rivalry 
with the purpose of dominating the air and extending the 
domain of man into regions which until a very few years 
ago were regarded as entirely inaccessible. It is our 
national glory to have taken the very decisive steps in 
the history of those human gains. It will also be our 
future glory that we have not fallen into the rear in this 
race, but have steadfastly maintained the fame of Ameri- 
can inventiveness and mechanical skill. 



If the war put many old forces, such 
Africa Awakening as the feudal classes of Germany, Aus- 
tria and Russia out of existence, it 
also brought, in other places, new forces into life and has 
made possibilities of action among people who before the 
war were considered as negligible savages. This has been 
particularly true of Africa, and a writer in the English Re- 
view. St. Barbe Baker, is very emphatic in his statement 
that the war should have been kept out of that continent, for 
its disturbing effects upon the African' natives can hardly be 
appreciated by those who were not acquainted with the 
country prior to the employment of large numbers of na- 
tives in European hostilities. Events have so speeded up 
an abnormal development that periods which it took Europe 
hundreds of years to pass will be traversed by Africans in 
a few decades. We have the motor car and the telephone 
side by side with the witch-doctor. The war has given the 
natives a fondness for the play of military evolutions and 
they are already organized with lighting men and a staff, 
which very cleverly imitates the methods of civilized fight- 
ers. Such is the ignorance of the civilized with respect to 
the African native, that none can say whether war sports 
are purely amusement or part of a hidden design to organize 
and drill the Africans for effective fighting. As a matter of 
fact, we know next to nothing of the history of Central 
Africa and the inner circle of the Council of Elders seems 
tii guard that history very closely. There seems to have 
been at some time a central kingdom to which all the tribes 
owed allegiance and there is today a very deep desire to 
restore that unity. What the effect of such a desire, coupled 
with the discipline and power of organization due to the 
war, will be on the nations now occupying and exploiting 
Africa, is one of the deepest and hardest problems of mod- 
ern imperialism. 



We make no apology for con- 
Air Ships Extraordinary stantly in the*e columns cal- 
ling attention to the develop- 
ment of air transportation because we think that it is 
destined to have a very important effect on the develop- 
ment of the race as a whole and we are convinced that it is 
perhaps the most remarkable achievement of this very 
remarkable quarter century. In the Shenandoah and the 
Los Angeles we have two very fine airships, the best to 
date. Now England is preparing t<> build two airships of 
five million cubic feet capacity or twice the size of the 
Shenandoah or the Los Angeles. These are to run be- 
tween England and India. They are to be ready by 1927. 
One is to be built by the government and the other by a 
commercial company. They will be 720 feet in length 
and 140 feet high, driven by seven engines each of 7<)l) 
horsepower burning heavy fuel oil. The maximum speed 
will be about 70 miles an hour and they will each accom- 
modate about a hundred persons. ( )f course, that all 
sounds quite formidable and does mark a great advance, 
but the specifications show that this form of transportation 
is. as yet. only in an experimental state and it may easilv 
happen that progress will be so rapid that these designs 
may be abandoned before completion, in view of great 
progress in heavier than air machines. What is worth 
while from the point of view of general human progress, 
is the fact, now fairly apparent, that the most energetic 



( hie would think to read the front 
Our Grisly Press page of the local papers that we were 

bathing in a sea of dread crime and 
awful and abandoned cruelty. The morning papers seem 
to have taken the motto of the Fat Boy in Pickwick and 
make our "blood run cold." They turn out for our delecta- 
tion columns of misery which make the heart to bleed, 
even the tears to congeal on our cheeks, these chilly morn- 
ings. Why is all this? Can it be truthfully said that the 
condition of things is worse than usual and that we are all 
off full speed to the eternal bowwows? We think not. 
There is no reason to suppose that any particular wave of 
fell and horrible criminality has struck us at the present 
time nor that this, the first month in a new year of grace, 
is bestotted and begored to a greater extent than its prede- 
cessors. Yet the front pages of our papers scream crime 
at us in flaring letters, and the evening papers follow 
suit, also piping the dance of death. To ride in a street 
car or on the ferry boat in the earlier hours of the morning 
and to watch the people with their morning papers is to 
see a group bowed in awe-struck interest over the talc of 
doings that would disgrace any tribe of savages. Think 
of the effect upon the minds of large numbers of those 
readers, of the horrible start to the day. of the perversions 
and psychological twists which arise from the contempla- 
tion of these monstrosities! If it were necessary it would 
be bad enough in all conscience; but it is not necessary. 



January 24, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Wells Fargo Bank and Union 
Our State Prosperity Trust Company have issued a 

pamphlet called "Business ( hit- 
look" in which the results of the fanning operations of the 
State are well handled. The report arrives at the con- 
clusion that the farming- operations resulted much better 
than was anticipated from the conditions earlier in the 
year. The drought caused a loss of about 25 per cent of 
the acreage harvested. There was an increase of 8 per 
cent in the acreage of tree-fruits over 1923. The total 
tonnage of field and tree-fruits was 7 per cent less than in 
1923, but increased prices brought the returns up to within 
1 per cent of the former year. Total value of the field and 
tree crops was in 1924 $368,427,000 as against $370,398,000 
in 1923, a comparatively slight falling off, very much less 
than was anticipated. There was also a slight falling off 
in the amount of lumber produced; $1,400,000,000, approxi- 
mately as against $1,600,000,000 in 1923; according to the 
estimates of the California White and Sugar Pine Associa- 
tion. The prices of lumber have increased, however, from 
$2.00 to $5.00 per thousand since the early autumn. The 
year 1924 was a good one for both fruit growers and pack- 
ers. There was a lower tonnage, but the prices were 
better than in 1923 and the carry-over is very slight as 
compared with most former years, about one-third less than 
it was last year. Taking it altogether, the State weathered 
what might have been a very bad year quite successfully 
and the agricultural and fruit growing sections are in good 
condition and can look forward with a great deal of con- 
fidence to the future. The cities were very prosperous 
and the industrial growth and commercial development 
of San Francisco is reflected in the fact that 5,027 new 
businesses were started and the building permits reached 
a point never before attained. $57,852,973 in building 
permits is a record of $7,000,000 higher than the best 
hitherto. 



Assemblyman S. C. Hart- 
Taxation of Public Utilities ranft of Fullerton has in- 
troduced a bill into the 
State Legislature which will undoubtedly cause much dis- 
cussion during the present session and possibly a good 
deal of feeling. He proposes to tax publicly-owned util- 
ities on the same basis as private utilities are taxed under 
the King Act, which is 7 per cent of the gross earnings. 
It is said that behind the proposed action is the support of 
the State Farm Bureau Federation and all the other farmer 
organizations. The idea is not to tax water and irrigation 
projects, as such, but all public light and power and trans- 
portation enterprises would be affected. The San Fran- 
cisco delegation announced that the bill would meet with 
their determined opposition ami the statement was made 
that the bill was an attack upon the principle of public 
ownership. If the community goes into municipal trading 
and the act only applies to municipal trading — it would 
appear to he equitable, that it should take up that phase of 
activity under the same conditions as apply to other enter- 
prises of a like character and that the public should not 
have the advantage over private concerns in so essential a 
matter as taxation. A San Francisco enterprise free from 
taxation places the state at a disadvantage with respect to 
the amount of taxation which could be derived from the 
enterprise if it were in private hands. It thus becomes very 
obvious why the farmers should object to municipal trad- 
ing enterprises being free from fair taxation, as the state 
must have the revenues. If the municipal enterprises are 
excused it mean- that the farmers would have to pay so 
much the more in taxation. The mere fact that an enter- 
prise is a public trading concern out of which a given com- 
munity gains or saves money, at least in theory, should not 
give that enterprise any advantage in taxation which might 
operate to the detriment of the rest of the State. 



He Took a Vacation 

\\ ho that was in the financial district, during the 70s 
and '80s does not remember the little old man that sold 
eye-glasses and spectacles, standing on the steps of one of 
the basement entrances of the old Merchants Exchange 
Building, on California street. He was always bundled in 
a thick overcoat and wore a big pair of goggles. For many 
years, in rain, or shine, heat, or cold, there he was, promptly 
at 8 o'clock, every morning, with a small push cart, bear- 
ing a big tray, full of his wares. If it rained, he was pro- 
tected by a big umbrella. The little man did a good busi- 
ness. His method was, to allow you to do your own fitting 
of the glasses. Bankers, brokers, merchants and others 
would stop and try one pair after another until they got 
one that was suited to their eyes and they all appeared to 
be satisfied. Many declared that they were better pleased 
than at the big optical stores. The little man and his cart, 
grew old together on the spot. His customers died, but 
he was always there. Bank and insurance clerks used to 
set their watches by him. One morning, California street 
got a shock. The little old man with the glasses was miss- 
ing. Three days passed and he did not appear. On the 
morning of the fourth day, another man' was there at 8 
o'clock, with the tray of glasses, ready for business. 

"Where is the little old man?" asked the writer. 

"Oh! He's gone on a vacation?" 

"Dead?" 

"Dead." 



A Square Deal 

Twenty years ago the suit on your back cost you thirty 
dollars ; today similar raiment costs you sixty ; twenty 
years ago a car ride was purchased for five cents ; today 
it is five cents! The contrast emphasizes the ludicrousness 
of the city railways situation : the materials and workman- 
ship entering into the manufacture of that suit of clothes 
are no whit different in volume from the material and work- 
manship incident to the railway upkeep and operation ; 
these have doubled or trebled in both cases but the corpora- 
tions are prohibited by archaic legislation from charging a 
just price for their "product." This is senseless and politics 
is to blame for the condition. 

In the Board of Supervisors is vested authority to grant 
relief for this intolerable and unjust condition, but favor- 
able votes being necessary to election, and permission 
granted for an increased tariff being handmaid to unpopu- 
larity politically, elective officials are fearsome of estab- 
lishing even the small though equable increase asked. 

Both the Municipal and Market Street railways are suf- 
fering seriously in their revenues — are tending toward the 
brink of bankruptcy — because of the five cents fare obtain- 
ing and it is a serious condition that must be remedied to 
stave off the inevitable crash. We therefore advocate the 
creation of a committee representing commercial and labor 
elements which would study the situation ; we are confident 
any unbiased body of serious observers would be forced to 
issue an opinion consonant with common justice. 



Why Daddy Washed 

Mr. and Mrs. Jones had been invited out to tea. 

"Come along, dearie," said Mrs. Jones to her three-year- 
old son, "and have your face washed." 

"Don't want to be washed." came the reply. 

"But," said mother, "you don't want to be dirty, do you? 
I want my little boy to have a nice clean face for the ladies 
to kiss " 

Upon this persuasion he gave way and was washed. 

A few minutes later he stood watching his father washing. 

"Daddy!" he cried. "I know why you are washing!" 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 24, 1925 




'LEISURE'S WW 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ lorn Moore- 




By Katherine Schwartz 
Formerly of the "Chicago Tribune" 



Curran 

AS a long time admirer of Pauline Frederick both on 
stage and screen, I rise to say that in her new play, 
"The Lady," which opened Monday night at the Curran, 
she displays a depth of emotion and intensity never dreamed 
of before. 

In this play, a rather melodramatic, but gripping and 
unusual drama, she ran the gamut of emotions — lightness 
and gayety, then quick as a flash, portraying the very 
depths of tragic emotion. She carried her audience with 
her, playing on their emotions so that they responded to her 
every mood. 

The play opens with a prologue — The Brixton Bar, 
Havre, France. In this she portrays the keeper of this bar, 
in a reminiscent mood. Next she is seen as the beautiful 
and honest Polly Pearl in the dressing room of a London 
Theatre, then as the wife of an English gentleman who 
tires of her and wants to divorce her, then in the next act 
as a distracted mother who sacrifices everything" for her 
child's welfare, and finally in the epilogue, where her intense 
mother love again prompts her to sacrifice herself for her 
boy. 

There is a splendid supporting cast. June Elvidge as the 
devil-may-care Fanny LeClare gives a splendid character- 
ization. Special mention must be made of George Barraud 
as the weak husband ; Charles Coleman as the flashy race 
track lover; Rose Dione as Mine. Blanche. 

To my mind, "The Lady," from start to finish, is one of 
the smoothest and best acted plays I have seen for many a 
day. Much credit is due for the direction of this play by 
Lillian Albertson, and to my way of thinking it is another 
big triumph for Louis O. Macloon, who produced it. 



Jascha Heifetz 

With every seat filled, and many standing, Beatty's 
Casino presented a gala appearance Sunday afternoon, fur 
the only appearance of Jascha Heifetz in San Francisco this 
season. 

He comes heralded as the world's premiere technician on 
the very difficult instrument, the violin, and after hearing 
him, we acquiesce in this claim. Certainly nothing on the 
program overtaxed his ability. 

Opening at his concert with the Concerto by Glazounoff, 
he gave a perfect demonstration of the Auer teaching. Fol- 
lowing this very difficult work was a variety of exquisite 
and delicate numbers, ranging from the Sixteenth Centurv 
to the very modern Cyril Scott — finishing his program witii 
the Introduction and Tarrantelle by Sarasate. 

The audience refused to leave, and he very graciously 
responded with several encores. Surelv there is only one 
Heifetz! 

A word in passing must be given to the very excellent 
accompaniments as played by Isidor Achron. 



Golden Gate 

A well known favorite of the stage and screen heads the 
bill at the Golden Gate next week, in her new offering, 
"Scrubby." Assisted by Williard Barton and Edward Tall- 



man, Miss Barriscale in the title role gives a splended per- 
formance as the little scrub girl. 

Herbert Williams, in his very funny offering, "Soup to 
Nuts," is guaranteed to chase away the blues. Ruth Budd, 
aerialist, musician and dancer, has a splendid offering. 

Odiva, "the water queen," and her school of Pacific sea 
lions, will be seen in an exhibition of diving, endurance, 
and feats of grace in a large glass tank. Walter Weems, 
monologist, presents "Southern Humor." Rhea and Mar- 
guerite Lorner, little English dancing girls have a pleasing 
number. 

On the screen will be seen "Idle Tongues," which was 
adapted from the very popular novel of Joseph Lincoln's 
"Dr. Nye." Claude Sweeten and the orchestra have some 
special numbers in preparation. 



Orpheum 

Joseph E. Howard, popular musical comedy composer, 
with a company of 25 singers, dancers, comedians and musi- 
cians, will head the new bill at the Orpheum next week. 
Edith and Dickie Barstow. Mammy Jinny, Jannette Gil- 
more, Ed and Mirian Root, Ruth Miller and The California 
Serenaders are some of the principals who will be seen 
with Mr. Howard in his new musical offering entitled "The 
Toy Shop." 

Another popular musical comedy star, Mabel McCane, is 
also on the bill in a novelty of song called "Life," written 
expressly for her by Blanche Merrill. 

William Damarest with his $1.50 cello, and Estelle Col- 
lette, the talented violinist, have an entertaining 1 mixture 
of comedy and artistry. W'alter and Emily Walters, ven- 
triloquists will entertain in an original manner. 

Lew Lockett and Peggy Page in "Say It While Dancing,"' 
assisted by Ruby Ward at the piano ; Neal Abel and his 
darkv stories; Don Valero premier wire dancer complete 
the bill. 



Strand 

"Listen Dolly," this week's offering of Will King and his 
company is replete with laughs and good musical numbers. 
Will King and Lew Dunbar appear in this number as a 
couple of tramps and laughs and chuckles are the rule from 
the moment they walk on. 

Bessie Hill and James Ellard stopped the show the night 
I saw them in their impersonations of the different stars, 
ending up with Ellard impersonating Will King. 

The opening number, a group of "California" songs done 
by Clara La Verne and Howard Evans, is especially beauti- 
ful, but it is unfortunate Miss La Verne had to sing with 
such a heavy cold. The scenic effects in this number are 
lovely — a bungalow tucked into a valley between two 
mountain peaks, and in the last number the chorus carried 
the letters to spell "California." 

Another pleasing number is Will Aubrey's excelling sinn- 
ing of "Wait Till the Morning After" — he was obliged to 
give several encores. 

Hermie King had some pleasing numbers, including a 
saxophone solo by Mickey McConnell. 



January 24, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Next week this popular company will 
offer "Papa Loves Mama," with Alma 
Aster, an old favorite of the Casino 
pays added to the cast. 



Wilkes 

Kolh and Dill, the ever popular 
comedians are playing to packed 
houses at the Wilkes — and their new 
vehicle, "Politics," seems to have 
"caught on" with a vengeance. 

The play affords a glimpse of po- 
litical methods as they used to be, and 
Ernie Ball and his galaxy of beautiful 
girls come in for their share of ap- 
proval. 



S. F. Symphony 
Mischa Elman 

Just to prove that San Francisco is 
indeed a music-loving city, there were 
perhaps twelve thousand people at the 
Auditorium to listen to the famous 
artist, Mischa Elman, play the very 
difficult Tschaikowsky Concerto in D 
Major for violin. Elman always has 
been noted for his large tone and dis- 
played this to the best advantage in 
the large auditorium. He played the 
most difficult passages with apparent 
ease — at times appearing almost care- 
less, and the Andante was rich in color 
and phrasing. He was most gracious 
with encores which would not be de- 
nied by the large audience. 

A very happy and entertaining pro- 
gram was also offered by the splendid 
symphony orchestra playing such pop- 
ular selections as the Peer Gynt Suite, 
by Grieg ; and "The Irish Washer- 
woman," by Sowerby ; "Caprice Vien- 
nois," by Kreisler ; and "In the Vil- 
lage," from the Caucasian Sketches of 
Ippolitow-Ivanow., which was offered 
a few weeks ago to our great delight, 
the English horn and the viola were 
heard to great advantage. The Leonora 
overture by Beethoven opened the pro- 
gram. 



French Theater 

Under the direction of Andre Fer- 
rier, "La Fleur d'Oranger," an up-to- 
date three-act comedy, by Andre Bira- 
beau and Georges Dolly, is to be pres- 
ented this evening at La Gaite Fran- 
caisc, 1470 Washington street, and will 
be repeated on Friday evening and Sat- 
urday afternoon. This play was one 
of the greatest of the 1924 successes 
in Parts. Saiil the critic of "Le 
Figaro"; "'La Fleur d'Oranger' est 
unc comedie ou les families pourront 
iver de 1'allegresse. Ces 3 actes 
sont pleins de drolerie et d'agrement." 

In the local presentation Ferrier 
plays the leading role as Raymond le 
het. 



Warfield 

"So Big," one of tin- truly great stories 
of all time and one of the biggest sellers 
of today, has been brought to the screen 
with the versatile Colleen Moore as its 
star and will be at the Warfield theatre 
attraction for one week beginning next 
Saturday. 

Following a series of "flaming youth" 
and "flapper" stories, this star attempts 
to offer proof conclusive that she is an 
actress of the very first order, for in "So 
Big" she portrays the life of a woman 
from 18 to SO, a feat which few actresses 
would have the temerity to even try. 

Surrounding the star is a long list of 
film celebrities that sound like a "who's 
who" screenland. Most important of 
these is Wallace Beery, Ben Lyon, John 
Bowers, Ford Sterling, Jean Hersholt, 
Sam DeGrasse, Dot Farley, Gladys 
Brockwell, Rosemary Theby, Phyllis 
Haver, Charlotte Merriman, Henry 
Herbert and Frankie Darrow. 

Fanchon will offer another of her 
spectacular reviews that will compare 
favorably with her "Bagdad Ballet." A 
comedy, a concert by the music masters 
under Severi's guidance, and other short 
films will also be included. 



Alcazar 

The second week of the riotously 
funny farce-comedy, "Just Married" at 
the Alcazar is announced, beginning 
Sunday night. The Henry Duffy Play- 
ers have entered into the spirit of this 
amusing play in a manner that puts it 
over with a vim, and those who like to 
laugh and are fascinated by situations 
of an original sort, will find much that 
is entertaining in it. 

Despite the implication that might 
be taken from the name, "Just Mar- 
ried" is iu no sense a bed-room farce 
of the sort that thrived several sea- 
sons ago. It is a brand new comedy 
(Continued on Page 22) 



ALCAZAR 

O'Farrell Street at Powell 

Telephone Kearny Two 

ttrd Meek Nundny \ Ik lit, Jnniinry 2."(h 

Seats Now! 

THE HENRY Dl FFV PLAYERS 

Prenent 

A Boat Lond of i.nuehs 

"JUST MARRIED" 

By the Author of "Able - * Irish Rose" 

Nights: 25c. 50c. 75c. $1. $1.25 

Bargain Matinees Wednesday. Thursday 

Saturday — 25c. 50c. 75c 



fiESTFLOWE^' 




TneVbos c/"« Thousand Oardens' 

224-226 fowl An. TeL Kearny 4975 



Amusements 

NEXT WBHK 



CASINO 

Ellis and Mason 



Plctnrea 

"The Girl on the 
Stairs" 

Vaudeville 



CAMEO 
936 Market St. 



'It Is the Law" 



CURRAN 
Geary, Nr. Mason 



Pauline Frederick 

(In Person) 

"The Lady" 



CALIFORNIA 

4th and Market 



"The Salvation 
Hunters" 



COLUMBIA 
Eddy and Mason 



May Rohson 

"Something Tells 
Me" 



CAPITOL 

64 Ellis St. 



'White Collars" 



GRANADA 
1066 Market St. 



Tom Mix 

'The Deadwood 
Coach" 



GOLDEN GATE 
G. G. Ave. and Taylor 



Picture 



'Idle Tongues" 

Vaudeville 



IMPERIAL 

1077 Market St. 



Marion Davies 

'Janice Meredith" 



LOEWS 
WARFIELD 
988 Market St. 



Edna Feber's 

"So Big" 



NEW FILLMORE 
NEW MISSION 



'He Who Gets 
Slapped" 



ORPHEUM 
O'Farrell and Powell 



Vaudeville 



PANTAGES 
Market at Mason 



Vaudeville 



STRAND 
965 Market St. 



Mill Klne ,v Co. in 

"Papa Loves 
Mama" 



„, TT ^.^-Formerlyl Kolb and Dill 
WlLKlib Geary I in 

Geary and Mason J "Politics" 



Concerts 



S. F. Symphony 

CURRAN THEATRE 

Sunday Afternoon, January 25 

ERNA RUBENSTEIN 
Violinist 



MARIA IVOGUN 

Scottish Rite Hall 

Monday Evening, January 26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 24. l r »25 






Mi-Lady and What She Reads. 

DOES mi-lady read? Indeed, she does. Ask the book- 
dealers. Inquire at the libraries. Question lecturers 
who give scholarly dissertations on world-wide affairs, or 
conduct students through preparatory travel tours. 

Mi-lady reads, not fiction only; nor newspaper headlines 
and society, alone; nor mere magazines, exclusively. She 
reads many of these from cover to cover, fashion magazines, 
especially; and the home periodicals; good magazines, and 
weeklies, the News Letter, for instance, where she finds 
much of reliable interest and real news. She reads other 
fine publications, weekly or monthly editions, according 
to individual taste and liking. 

.Mi-lady reads considerably. She must, forsooth, in order 
to keep up with the times. 

What if brother comes home well informed about the 
big things in the world and intelligently relates them to the 
family? Must sister only smile Mveet ignorance? No 
sir! 

She, too, must be able to participate in dinner hour 
table-talk, enter into discussions, and have ideas that regis- 
ter. Besides, the man whom she most admires is a man of 
affairs. She must, perforce, be mentally alert, in order to 
interest him. So, she thinks. 

I know of cultured American families who make it a 
daily schedule to discuss, at the dinner hour, events that 
have transpired in the world. It has been a custom handed 
down to them through generations of refinement, erudi- 
tion and progress. 

Every night the young folks seated at the evening meal 
are challenged to tell of some one thing that they have 
learned during the day. What big outstanding world-wide 
activity do they know? What has the city, the state or the 
nation done, particularly, to interest them? What old liter- 
ary classic have they read? What new book has been 
written? What opera, what music has the creative world 
given them that day? 

Has any great or brilliant man. any noble woman 
achieved something to brighten the world, or make brave 
the heart of humankind ? 

The mother presiding like a queen in the home, seated 
with happy dignity and graceful poise at her end of the 
damask tablecloth; father, keen and sensible, full of busi- 
ness reckonings; smile at each other, with beaming pride 
across the length of the family board, rejoicing over the 
refreshing things their .bright-minded children bring. 

There is never any gossip at these dinner tables. No 
idle chatter nor scandal in such homes. Things worth 
remembering are all that are allowed at the pleasant dinner 
hour to constitute their mental calories. For, these people 
do not just "have a meal." They dine. 

They dine with ceremony, gaining strength of mind as 
well as bodily refreshment and physical sustenance. 

Society, based on such foundations of American ideals, 
with such standards of hopes, resources and a generous 
view of life, contribute solidly to the unified force which 
makes this country a nation that commands the admiration 
and universal respect of mankind. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

050 Husli Street, Between Powell and Stockton, Snn FrnnuiHco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



By Antoinette Arnold 

Mi-lady read? Yes, she does. 

She has to — to keep apace with the men ! 



Officers of Men's Clubs. 

Election of officers in the most prominent of local or- 
ganizations seems to have been a pleasurable past-time 
during the week just closed. 

The annual meeting of the Union League Club held on 
Tuesday, January 13. places Mr. Charles W. Helser in 
the executive chair as president of the club. In making 
his annual report, the retiring president, Mr. John L. 
McNab, declared that the Union League Club was in ex- 
cellent financial condition. Less than one hundred resident 
memberships are now open, according to the report. 

In appreciation of the president a dinner has been an- 
nounced for the evening of Saturday, January 31, honoring 
Mr. McNab for his excellent executive service which has 
extended over a period of seven years. 

The new president will be supported by a staff of officers 
which includes: Hugh M. Cochran, first vice-president; 
John D. McGilvray, second vice-president; Frank P. 
Jacobs, treasurer; Charles E. Sloan, secretary; William F. 
Tatroe, Samuel F. Fulton, Ur. S. E. Welfield, Louis Fisch- 
beck, U. S. Webb, William Chatham, are the directors. 

* * * 

Officers of the club elected to serve through the new 
fiscal year on the executive board with Mr. A. E. Schwab- 
acher are : Mr. K. C. Ward, first vice-president; Mr. William 
• 1. Vilkmann, second vice-president; Mr. Ronald T. Rolph, 
honorary secretary ; Charles F. Ryan, executive secretary, 
reelected. The new directors of the Commercial Club in- 
clude Messrs. Charles W. Bain, James B. Black, E. A. 
Bunker, Victor F. Palmer and J. W. Pew. 

* * * 

"A Night in the South Seas" was the motif of an inter- 
esting dinner given the San Francisco Yacht Club, recently 
in Sausalito in compliment to members who are going to 
enter their yachts in a race to Papeete. 

A special ferry carried the guests from San Francisco 
and the bay cities to the scene of the gaiety, where dancing 
and merry making took place under the efficient manage- 
ment of a capable committee. 

* * * 

A wide acquaintance in the army set regrets the orders 
that take Colonel and Mrs. Charles Reese, of the Presidio, 
to Washington for the next few years. Colonel and Mrs. 
Reese sail on a transport January 23. 

General Morton Retires. 

\ftcr forty-two years of service in the United Stales 
Army. Major-General Charles G. Morton. Commander of 
the Ninth Corps Area, with headquarters at the Presidio, 
retires. The first plan for his leisure time is a trip with 
Mrs. Morton around the world. Following that they will 
pass at least some time at their country estate at Los Gatos 
in the Santa Clara foothills. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter 0130 Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 






January 24, 192S 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



HOTEL, CANTERBURY 
750 Slitter Street 

San Francisco's Finest 

Family Hotel 

250 Rooms 

Rates: From $2.50 per day 

Istead, Hotel 
Hotel Bilt- 
Ridge road. 



General Morton's officers said an official 
good-bye with a luncheon in the officers' mess 
at the Presidio, when Brigadier-General 
Henry T. Todd of the (.'oast Artillery pres- 
ented the retiring officer with a loving cup in 
tribute from his associates in the army circle. 
Menoher Coming * * * 

General Morton will be succeeded in com- 
mand of the Ninth Corps Area by Major- 
General Charles T. Menoher, who will arrive 
from the Hawaiian Islands on Monday on the 
transport Chateau Thierry. 

General Morton takes his place among a 
distinguished group of army and navy officers 
who are retired and living in the San Francisco 
Bay district environs. Some of these are: 
Major-General Hunter Liggett, 2760 Scott 
street ; Major-General Frank L. Winn, 2930 
Clay street; Major-General William C. Davis, 
2444 Oregon street, Berkeley; Brigadier-Gen- 
eral Ira A. Haynes, 81 Marcella avenue; Briga- 
dier-General E. (). Hunt, 1108 Shattuck 
avenue, Berkeley; Rear-Admiral William H 
Bullard, Hotel Cecil ; Rear-Admiral A. S. Ha 
St. Francis; Rear-Admiral John B. Milton, 
more; Rear-Admiral Charles F. Pond. 2621 
Piedmont; Rear-Admiral George C. Reiter, Los Gatos, and 
Rear-Admiral William H. Whiting, 1317 Arch street, 
Berkeley. 

During the long years when General Morton devoted 
his services to his country he took part in campaigns on 
the Indian frontier, the Spanish-American war, and the 
World War. 

Now Comes the Brilliant 
Gold Ball for Humanity's Sake 

Society has centered attention for several weeks on the 
Gold Ball to be given at the Civic Auditorium, Saturday 
night, January 24. when leaders of the smart set from San 
Francisco, the peninsula cities and the bay region will 
commingle in happy contribution of gaiety. 

The society matron. Mrs. Phillips Dunn, won Monday 
evening in the lively battle of votes for the chosen honor of 
Queen of the Mardi Gras Gold Ball, with a margin of 20,000 
votes over the pretty telephone girl. Miss Constance White, 
who ran a close second. Miss White was supported in the 
contest by the following out-standing ligures. 'who have 
been dubbed "The Four Horsemen": Chief of Police Dan- 
iel O'Brien, Lorry Harris, Frank Sykes and William II. 
McCarthy. The proceeds of the contest netted $35,000. 

Back of the social event is the big purpose for which the 
beautiful affair has been planned and that is — as it always 
has been with Mardi Gras affairs — the Children's Hos- 
pital. All of the proceeds accruing from the ball, this 
year, will be devoted to the construction of a new maternity 
wing to the hospital. 

Reservations have been received at the Mardi Gras head- 
quarters in the St, Francis Hotel for the supper that is to 
attend the Mardi Gras. This is to be served by the Hotel 
St. Francis management and will afford an interesting side 
picture to the big affair in the main auditorium. The menu 
is to be Italian, the decorations and setting in keeping with 
this idea, with Italian street singers. The supper arrange- 
ments are m charge >'i a committee headed by Mrs. Horace 
Hill .Mrs. Fentress Hill and Mrs. Edmunds Lyman. 




The committee on decorations and enter- 
tainment is headed by Mrs. Augustus Taylor 
and Mrs. Latham McMullin. A dazzling ar- 

ra\ o| prizes contributed by local merchants 
through thc.solicitation of a committee headed 
by Mrs. Andrew Welch will add to the inter- 
est of the evening. 

The doormen have been named by Mrs. 
Stewart Lowery, chairman. These, will form 
a striking picture garbed in evening mats, 
gold knickers, black silk hose and a broad rib- 
bon after the fashion of the Legion of Honor 
to be worn across the breast. 

Special preparations are under way to make 
the crowning of the queen impressive. Her 
court is being selected by a special committee 
headed by Mrs. George Bowles. Among those 
already named for ladies-of-waiting to the 
queen are Mrs. Nion Tucker, Miss Helen 
Foster, Miss Jean Howard, Mrs. George Eb- 
right, Mrs. Alexander Wilson, Miss Frances 
Mathieu, Mrs. William Schuman, Miss Gladys 
Quarre, Mrs. Ruth Fisher, Mrs. Alan Lowrey, 
Mrs. Kenneth Monteagle, Mrs. C. Ellsworth Wylie, Miss 
Audrey Willett, Mrs. Vernon Tenny, Mrs. George Hearst, 
Mrs. James C. Jackman, Misses Marie and Florence Welch, 
Mrs. Alfred Whittell, Mrs. Hooper Jackson, Mrs. John 
Clark Burgard, Mrs. John Boissevain. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralston White were hosts at one of the 
enjoyable recent dances, when they entertained a hundred 
of their friends at a party complimenting Mrs. White's 
brother and sister-in-law, Dr. and Mrs. Charles Boericke. 

The dance was given at "The Garden of Allah," the 
White's attractive home in Mill Valley. 



To Europe --Norway Cruises --South America 
West Indies 

ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET COMPANY 

"The I ninforl llmile" 

.-.Til MARKET STREET, - \ \ rnv\< l>i n 
Phnnr Sutler MS3 









Seeing Tour Way 
to Success 




Good eyesight often determines 
one's success or failure. An in- 
conspicuous pair of glasses will 
stop the drain of nervous energy 
that comes from eyestrain. 
Good vision is a prime essential 
of success. There is only one way 
to be sure. Have your eyes 
examined today. 

HIRSCH&KAYE 

Optometrists 

139 Grant Avenue 
SAX FRANCISCO 











SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 24, 1925 




By Hoot McGregor 



Jim Symon, the Adonis of the water tront, and Jack 
Hazlett, the giant golf aces of the Masons, have invited Jack 
Taver, the giant from Texas, to compete for the heavy- 
weight golf championship of the state. 



Walter Hood, the expert accountant, always turns in a 
fine score ; no wonder he's fine at figures. 



Jim and Jack admit that their combined weight doesn't 
compare with the Texan's, but weight don't count in a 
golf match. 



Harry Marsh is going to take along a laundry tray. He 
says the cups are too small. 



Burr Eastwood, Sr., is going to try his hand, but insists 
that he should be allowed to use a tennis racket in driving. 



Jim Symon says he bumped one the other day farther 
than Abe Mitchell ever did. 



Symon hit one off Pier 41 that landed in Alameda on 
a ferry boat. 



Jack Hottes and Bob Nicholson, the east bay champs, are 
coming over to show the city boys how golf should be 
played. 



Lee Dolson says he hopes his son Lee, Jr., will caddie 
for him, then he's sure to win. 



Jim Wallace, of Crane Co., says the reason he plays such 
classy golf is to be in keeping with his display exhibit. 



The Symon brothers. Bill, Dave, George, Jack, Jim and 
Turn, have challenged the Walker sextette, Bert, Harry, 
Joe, Tom, Bill and Charlie, to a golf match, the losers to 
pay for a trip around the world. 



Mike Wangenheim is hurrying back from the east so that 
he can give Newt Stern a trimming. 



Frank White, the reporter's nose-gay, declares that he 
will reduce his score this month by at least 2 columns. 



Frank Keesling has been taking enough time from his 
political activities to secretly prepare himself to cover the 
course in less than par. 



Jim Pinkerton is going along to keep the boys honest in 
the count. 



"Bill" Crocker has clipped his beard in order to lighten 
his weight for the approaching match. 



Joe Ahlbach says his motto is "Think Twice," and gives 
that as the cause of his high score. 



Jack Houston says anyone can get in the bunkers, but 
show me the man that can dig them out. 



Charlie and Lloyd Traung hope to put their label on 
the Championship Cup. 



John Wished claims he is the champion veteran grand 
secretary of golf in America. Jack is willing to back his 
opinion up to a 1,000. 



Harold Ballantine is always there with his $10 smile, but 
when it comes to golf Herb Billsbrough always puts the 
585 sign on him. 



Ira Coburn is willing to wager he can go around the 
course in less than a day. 



Claude Alexander, the golfing tenor, is willing to take on 
McCormick or Martinelli anytime they will train down 
to his scale. 



Arthur Joel has been conditioning himself by hiking over 
Marin hills. 



Walter Walsh, the diminutive vice-president, says he will 
take up golf if he can get clubs small enough. 



Bill Warden has just purchased several new suits of golf 
togs, and hopes to make a score with them. 



Bill Carson has bought a new record called "The First 
Hundred Strokes are the Hardest." 



George Pomeroy, the Shrine Drummer, will furnish the 
music on the tee. 



Herbert Molt has stored his clubs for the winter. 



"Bill' Sherman, the ice peddler, has promised to supply 
the ice for the 19th hole. 



"Parson" Sherman says he is going to build a "Robot" 
to play his woods for him. 



"Jawn" McNab will use Scotch thrift on his strokes and 
thus save effort. 



Jack Houston claims it is a cinch to play around the 
'World" with a putter. 



Bill Newhouse, the banker, and his brother Hugo will 
play the Bernard twins, Ed and Al. 



Al Ferreria is now out of the hospital and claims that in 
about 30 days he will be able to give Norman Kidwe'l a 
sweet trimming. 



Hugh McKevitt, the Pote, has resorted to Blackstone to 
prove the game of golf is non compis mentis. 



Louis Thynnes claims that he holds the record for selling 
bonds on the golf links. 



January 24, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 






LF1NANCIAU 

By Edward H. Manning 

THE Southern Pacific "Spur Track" is creating quite a 
bit of trouble. I can sympathize, in some measure, 
with the resident protestants, but I cannot but realize that 
industrial development is the first consideration, as things 
are. The difficulty is always to reconcile the conflicting 
viewpoints of the old and the new spirit. "Youth must be 
served," as all parents know. Will the S. P. people send me 
the means of forming a balanced opinion? It too often 
happens that newspaper men mislead the public through 
lack of full information. I have no predilections and am 
no propagandist. 

* * * 

— "California for the Cotton Planter," recently issued by 
the Southern Pacific Company, should be in the hands of 
everyone interested in the progress of our state. I happen 
to know that, not long since, a member of one of the 
largest cotton houses in Liverpool, (Eng.), was prospect- 
ing in California, with a view to investment in the growing 
end, and that he went back deeply impressed with climatic 
conditions in parts of the state, for the growth of the 
American type — the best for all-around purposes. I won- 
dered if we were about to witness a second edition of the 
oil story. I do know that the gentleman was qualified to 
judge ; I know, too, that the Britisher does not form con- 
clusions hastily. 

* * * 

— May I ask the Southern Pacific Bureau of News why 
a copy of the booklet has not been sent to me? I am in- 
terested in what they tell me about it, but a copy of the 
publication would tell me far more. 

^ H* H* 

— I am sometimes sorry for such men as Mentzner, con- 
suming midnight oil on matters regarded by him as so 
much more important than beachcombing, lie will have it 
that the financial district ought to be interested in the 
truth, that actual conditions in industry are more influential 
in deciding their financial fate than the gossip"of the side- 
walk. And — here's the rub — can they be induced to think 
that the laborer is worthy of his hire if their palate is not 
educated to the appreciation of what he produces for their 
consumption? The tripe and onions addict is with difficulty 
fed by a Ritz cook. * * * 

— For a paltry $40 a year he gives four valuable letters 
a month and as many — in reason — carefully studied opin- 
ions as demanded, by telephone, or by personal letter. The 
opinions are justly described as "studied." No wonder he 
wears a worried look, as lie sits in his office in the Crocker 
Building. * * * 

— A big construction and maintenance program, the P. G. 
& E.'s for what we are getting accustomed to hear spoken 
of as "a banner year." Around eighteen million dollars will 
be spent. Early next July the Pit No. 3 plant of the 
Chain of 1 1 vdro-Klectric Developments on the Pit River 
will be in operation and adding 1,000.000 killowatt hours of 
electrical energy daily to the company's output, but long 
this plant is completed men will be at work on Pit 
Xo. 4 plant. This No. 4 plant calls for a tunnel four miles 
long, a big diversion dam, a surge chamber, three Penstock 
line- and a Power I louse with an installed capacity of 
135,000 horsepower. $2,500,000 of the $15,000,000 that Pit 
No. 4 will cost, will be spent in 1925. 
(Continued on rago i^» 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

(LATELY THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY) 
SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

by mergers or-consolidatlonswlth other Banks. 



Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

S26 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1924 

Assets $96,917,170.69 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,000,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 461,746.52 



MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haieht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Porta I Ave, and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (4J4) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid Up Capital $20,000,000 $20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued, CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES 
THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 
PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

San Francisco Office: 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHAHD 

Manager Asgt. manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 
Walter W. Derr, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douglas 2244 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



"The Largest Fire Insurance 
Company in America" 

Fire, Automobile, Windstorm. 
Tourists' Baggage Insurance 

: : REASONABLE RATES 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 
208 Crocker Building (Opposite Palace Hotel) San Francisco 
Phone Kearny 391 



^"Mayerle's Eyewater" 

POT H year* the nm-«t popular Kye Tnnlr 
for rli Mil rrn nnd mlulf*. At ■! ' iikl: i>l» ."c, 
lij- rnnil 7«c. 

I George Mayerle, Expert Optician, 960 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 




12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 24, 1925 



Bits of Unwritten History 



By Edward S. Spring 



CHAPTER XX 
Old Time "Practical Jokers" 

THE old San Francisco Stock and Exchange Board in- 
cluded several inveterate, "practical jokers" in its mem- 
bership, and they surely made fun for themselves anil the 
crowd on occasions. Chief among them was Fulton G. 
Berry, afterwards appointed Commissary of the State 
Prison at San Quentin and who, later, went to Fresno and 
made a big fortune in real estate there and became widely- 
known as the "Commodore of the Fresno Yacht Club." 
A bulky volume could be filled with stories of the pranks 
which Berry played upon his fellow brokers in the Board, 
but, an account of what was regarded as his crowning 
achievement in the practical joking line, will now suffice. 
It contains several things not hitherto published. 

Berry was a very tall and slim man and added to his 
height by wearing a tall silk hat, that is — when his col- 
leagues in the pit allowed him to keep it on his head. He 
generally wore this kind of hat well tilted back and had 
to buy a new one every few days, when the previous hat 
became badly battered. The tall silk hat had no connection 
with Berry's great practical joke and is only mentioned to 
show the man's eccentricity. And now, for the story. 

Berry selected for his victim, one of the oldest, richest 
and most elegant members of the Board. Seventy years of 
age and always dressed in the height of fashion, this per- 
son carried himself with great dignity. Early in life, he 
had become quite bald and had taken to wearing a wig. 
As the years advanced, he wore his wigs grayer and grayer, 
in order to conform to his age. The wig, at this time, was 
almost white and formed a contrast to his full, florid face 
and carefully trimmed, well-waxed mustache. 

The day Berry played his joke, the little, old boardroom 
on California street, where the Insurance Exchange build- 
ing now stands, was closely packed with spectators, and 
several distinguished visitors from the East were present in 
the gallery. The brokers' seats were in several rows, in a 
semi-circle, around the center of the room. Berry's elderly 
victim had a seat in the outer row, next to the railing. He 
had just sat down and carefully removed his hat, when 
Berry quickly slipped around behind him and tied one end 
of a long string to the railing. At the other end of the 
string, was a small fish hook and this was cleverly fastened 
to the back of the old gentleman's wig by Berry. The latter 
then hastened to his own seat, after having had a few 
words with one of the messenger boys at the entrance to the 
pit. The gong sounded and the session was called to order by 
Chairman Howard Coit. The latter was about to call the 
stock list, when the messenger boy, spoken to by Berry, was 
seen to hurry over to the elderly broker and hand him a 
small note. It was evident that somebody wished to see 
him at the door. He rushed into the center, with the 
string trailing behind him. When half across the center 
of the pit, the string became taut, and — 

Off flew his wig, exposing his bald head, bare and 
glistening, like a billiard ball, to the full view of the as- 
tonished brokers and spectators. Amid the veils and laugh- 
ter that followed, and which the chairman was unable to 
check for several minutes, the mortified victim of Berry's 
joke, recovered and replaced his wig and left the room, 
glaring around to discover the perpetrator of such an 
outrage. 

It was really- a mean trick for Berry to play and even his 
best friends, who knew that he was guilty, did not condone 
the act. But they, and others, who saw him fasten the hook. 



were loyal to him and not even a liberal reward that the 
highly respectable old financier offered, tempted them to 
confess the secret. 

Like most practical jokers, "Fult" Berry was a poor hand 
to take a joke played upon himself. Other members of the 
old San Francisco Stock and Exchange Board who were 
great jokers included W. C. Budd and J. W. ("Billy") 

Brown. 

* * * 

Guarding His Treasures 

There was a little man on the street, in the old times, 
named "Jake" Marx. He was well-to-do and had the bum]) 
of caution developed to a high degree. He was a box- 
holder in the old California Safe Deposit Vaults and so care- 
ful was he of his treasures, there, that every afternoon, 
when he locked his compartment and started for the street, 
he would return several times and feel of the little steel 
plate, that covered the key-hole, to make sure that his box 
was secure. This was noticed by many and among them, 
"Billy" Brown, who saw a good chance to play one of his 
pranks. 

So, "Billy" Brown obtained some of the stationery bear- 
ing the letter-head of the California Safe Deposit Company 
and addressed a note to Mr. Jacob Marx. This missive 
he left with a barkeeper in Leege's saloon on Halleck street, 
where there was a stock ticker that Marx used to visit 
regularly at 10 a. m., every day. Marx was to be given the 
note immediately he entered. When Marx opened the note, 
it read something like this: 

Dear Mr. Marx: — Important. Come here at once. We 
wish to know if you locked your box yesterday afternoon. 
(Signed) Calif. Safe Deposit Box Co. 

Marx, upon reading this note, turned white and nearly 
collapsed, but partly recovered and ran, as fast as he was 
able, to the safe deposit vaults where he learned that the 
whole thing was a hoax. This was also a cruel trick, but 
Marx was a good sport and pretended, at least, to enjoy 
it. It was observed, however, that he did not relax in his 
daily habit of making sure that his box was securely locked. 

* * * 
Telling Ore By Taste 

Four old Comstockers were disputing over what mines 
half a dozen samples of ore came from. One of their num- 
ber knew. The others had a hot discussion over one par- 
ticular piece of rock and named the wrong mine, until one 
of them — old Archie Borland — took the piece and passed his 
tongue over it several times and then smacked his lips, 
saying — "That's from the Savage." And it was. 
(To be continued). 



"What do you do when your wife tells you of her first hus- 
band ?" 

"Envy him!" — Karikaturen (Christiania). 

* * * 

He — -"How much do you weigh ?" 

She — "Oh, not enough to spoil the crease in your trousers." 

- — Lafayette Lyre. 

* * * 

Diner — "I'd like a juicy tender steak, medium done, with a 
lump of butter on top." 

Soho Waiter — "That would be very nice, sir. And now, 
what will you have?" 

He — "Where did you do most of your skating while learn- 



ing; 



She 



"I think you're horrid. 



"Mamma." cried little Tommy, "Hilly Thompson hit me!" 
"What did he hit you for?" asked his mother, ready to take 
up arms against Mrs. Thompson. 
" 'Cause I hit him," piped Tommy. 



January 24. 1925 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller, 
National Automobile Club 

SPRING is already in the air and in 
spite of the fact that the higher 
Sierras are resting under a blanket of 
snow, it will only be a few weeks be- 
fore the Yosemite roads will open and 
the annual Economy Run, which marks 
the start of the motor car season in 
the Yosemite, will be under way. An- 
nouncement was made by the National 
Park Service recently that Yosemite is 
at last to be rescued from dust and 
motoring dangers. Its valley roads 
will be paved and its mountain roads 
widened, straightened, and flattened. 
For years efforts of the National Park 
Service have been directed toward the 
securement of funds for the purpose of 
improving the road system of various 
national parks that visitors might tour 
them in comfort and safety. The first 
tangible result of these efforts came 
when on December 5, the President 
affixed his signature to the Second De- 
ficiency Bill, which carries an item of 
$1,000,000 for the improvements of 
roads in the national parks and monu- 
ments. This money became available 
immediately, and of the total sum, 
$150,000 has been allotted to Yosemite 

National Park. 

A second hill now being considered 
by Congress carries an additional $1,- 
500,000 for similar purposes with every 
indication of becoming a law in the 
near future. < M' tin- amount, it i- ex- 
pected that Yosemite will get S.oO.OOO. 
thereby making a total of $500,000 
available during the first year of a 
three years road improvement program 
authorized last year by Congress, dur- 
ing which Yosemite will receive $1,- 
1,000 for the improvement ami re- 
construction of it^ road system. 
* * * 

Some snow has fallen at Placerville. 
hut melts rapidly. Those seeking snow 



AND CALIF! IRNIA ADVERTISER 

in quantity will find it at the 14-mile 
house above Placerville. They can 
continue as far as the ld-mile house, 
hut beyond this point the road is 
closed. 



More than 225 
nearly 457 miles 



miles of roads and 
of trails were con- 
structed within or adjacent to the 17 
National Forests of California during 
the last fiscal year, according to re- 
port by the San Francisco district 
headquarters of the U. S. Forest Serv- 
ice. In addition, maintenance work 
was performed on 963 miles of roads 
and 3,617 miles of trails. Major road 
projects were built in co-operation with 
the Bureau of Public Roads. 

Including the construction work 
completed within the last year, the 
total mileage of National Forest roads 
in California District constructed by 
June 30 of this year stood at 535 and 
the total mileage of trails at 1,642. 

The sum of $1,396,146 was expended 
on National Forest road and trail work 
in California by the Forest Service dur- 
ing the last fiscal year. This sum was 
augmented by funds to the amount of 
$396,000 from co-operative agencies 
such as the State, counties and local 
organizations. 



Under this program, by the end of 
1927, the main roads on the floor of 
Yosemite Valley and El Portal Road 
to its connection with the all year 
highway, now under construction by 
the State, will have been paved, and 
the entire mountain road system of the 
park reconstructed on safe widths and 
grades, surfaced with gravel or crushed 
rock, and sprinkling systems installed. 

As this program progresses, Yose- 
mite winter and summer, will become 
more anil more the mountain mecca of 
in. itorists. 

* * * 

Some states have a motor vehicle 
law requiring motorists to dim their 
lights while passing a car coming from 
the opposite direction. Such a law. if 
enacted in California, with all of its 
traffic, would cause inconvenience and 
slow down the speed of the car> on the 
road to an irksome rate. Yet such a 
law for this State i> not in any way 
an impossibility, and whether it really 
ever does become effective here, in my 
estimation, depends largely upon the 
co-operation the motorists give to the 
present lens law. 

Have you ever ventured forth on a 
dark night and had the experience of 
a car coming from the opposite direc- 
tion almost cause you to drive off the 
road because of the glare of headlights? 
You naturally condemn the driver of 
this car. yet the chances are that your 
own lights are just as much out ~<i 
focus as the other car"s. 



13 



The State has appointed in every 
city certain garages and battery houses 
to act as testing stations for automo- 
bile lamps. These places are fully 
qualified to not only examine the lights 
but adjust or repair them if necessary. 
A flat rate charge is prescribed for this 
service, which is most nominal. The 
fact that nine out of every ten cars 
on the road have poorly adjusted head- 
lights shows the present amount of 
co-operation given this law. 

As thousands of accidents each year 
are directly caused by poor lights, it is 
obvious unless the present law is fol- 
lowed more closely by car owners, a 
new one will have to take its place. 

ANNUAL MEETING 

The Joshua Hendy Iron Works 

The regular annual meeting of the stock- 
holders of The Joshua Hendy Iron Works will 
be held at the office of the corporation, No. 75 
Fremont Street, San Francisco, California, on 
Tuesday, the 10th day of February, 1925, at 
the hour of 10 o'clock a. m., for the purpose 
of electing a Board of Directors to serve for 
the ensuing year, and the transaction of such 
other business as may come before the meet- 
ing. CHAS. C. GARDNER, 

Secretary. 
Office: 75 Fremont Street, 
San Francisco, Calif. 



General Auto Body Repairing 

Stationary Top General Trimming 

Telephone Market 1835 

Tom Meek 

Auto Body Building 

Company 

710 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 

San Frnnclsco, Cat. 
Radiator and Fender Repairing 
' THOS. J. MEEK 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 

Wilson Bros. Co. 

Incorporated 

tOt-M 1MRKET STREET 

Ret. Franklin and Gough 

Telephone Park WTt 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 24, 1925 




By EDWIN 

Rugby Football. A splendid example of true American 
Sportsmanship was set during- the holiday weeks just 
passed. 

Hardly noticed by the local press, a few followers, just 
a mere handful, of the now practically dead Western sport, 
Rugby, organized themselves and started practice. Every- 
thing was against them. They were men of "medium" 
years, very much past college days, who were spending 
their time in the busy realm of business, and though weary 
after their day's toil, they gave a few hours of strenuous 
effort to their Rugby practice, even in the rain, and right 
up till the time old Sol's last rays vanished. Then into a 
shower, and home, not to study as of yore, but to families 
of their own. However in time they raised the necessary 
funds, and went up to British Columbia to struggle it out 
in Rugby fashion for supremacy with their English brothers. 

Against the odds of their older years, their length of time 
out of the game, their lack of boosters on the side lines, 
they battled their way to victory, conquered in every en- 
counter and brought home the bacon. 

When a man lays down his life for his country he is a 
hero, so when a man lays aside his work and dons football 
togs just to show that America is still supreme even in 
Britain's own sport, we'll say he's a sportsman! 

More sportsmanship is our crying need. Teach it to the 
Young Idea. The Boy Scout Movement keeps it alive and 
breeds it in our youth. Why not give the Scouts your 
support? This movement tends to make bigger and better 

men. 

* * * 

And now come Helen Wills and Paavo Nurmi, two ( >lym- 
pic World Champions, one a shining example of American 
womanhood, the other an excellent example of the best in 
European manhood! Both, however, the results of con- 
centration. 

Little "Poker Face" as the Sport Writers have named 
Miss Wills, concentrated on Tennis. She didn't just live 
and breathe it as the ordinary Idea of Concentration goes, 
but when she had her racquet in hand, she dismissed tem- 
porarily from her mind all thoughts of outside interest and 
happenings. Tennis commanded and circulated through 
her veins. The result was not just a half way done job, 
but a real thought out product. 

The "Runner of Runners," with years of devotion to one 
branch of sport, Running, has also Concentrated. He ate in 
accordance to training rules, studied out track problems 
scientifically, i. e., just what movements were necessary 
and what were lost motion. He built up a "world beating" 
body and stamina, and did not stop training when success 
came, just kept on plugging, not just to prepare for 15,000 
meter runs, but for a longer one yet, the Race of Life. 

Concentration is the thing. Ever stop to think that 
when you stumble on the stairs, cut your finger with a 
knife, hit the "hammer with your thumb," its just because 
for the moment your mind wandered. The Object in View 
disappeared, and you did not accomplish your aim? 

And by the way, Nurmi may be a member of our famous 
California advertiser, the Olympic Club. He is at present 
negotiating business arrangements which may allow him 
to enjoy sunny California's sun and invigorating San Fran- 
cisco fog. 

* * * 

Boxing under the new California State Laws is due for 
a big boost. It should soon come under the head of a 
Gentleman's Sport in the real meaning of the word, in- 



MARRIOTT 

dulged in by gentlemen and enjoyed by the same element. 
Already several fighters have been barred from future ap- 
pearance by not showing up at bouts scheduled for them 
by promoters and accepted by them. These "run out" tac- 
tics will not be tolerated by the new Commission. 

Captain Seth Strellinger has no equal in the country for 
being absolutely suited to his position as president of the 
Boxing Commission. The game will profit by his able ser- 
vices. 

The boxing world has just lost by retirement one of its 
greatest exponents and upliftcrs, Benny Leonard. For 
many years he has held his title against all comers. In 
fact it was away back in 1917 when he downed Freddie 
Walsh for the Lightweight Championship of the world. It 
was only however after five years of battling with many 
other just as ambitious youngsters. 

His last opponent, who had won the right to meet him, 
was Pal Moran, whom he punched to submission in August 
of last year. 

Leonard was always noted for his gentlemanliness both 
in his ring and every day life. 

For many years Benny's mother has been failing in 
health. Time and again she has requested him to give up 
the business. During every ring encounter his mother was 
in a terrible mental condition and after it was over would 
often collapse totally from the anguish she suffered. In 
fact, she suffered more than her child ; much as the father, 
who was spanking his child, said : "Son, this hurts me more 
than it does you." But at last Benny has given in to her 
pleas and has retired for good and for always, he says. 

Just as so many of' our World War Veterans have so 
often said ; "It's nice to be a hero and all that, but you can 
not eat medals nor can you put them in the bank and draw 
against them." 

This same idea of the peculiar power money has of talk- 
ing, has evidently gotten into one Jackie Fields of 
amateur fame. He, too, went to the last Olympic game 
as one of the defenders of America's glories and returned 
victorious, with the World's Featherweight Championship 
to his credit. But it's a long time between Free Meals sup- 
plied our teams enroute to the Olympic Games, so, to keep 
his stomach off his backbone, he has turned Professional. 
Here's hoping that he eats regularly as so many ex-ama- 
teurs have failed utterly on entering the pro world. 
# * # 

Swimming, the most complete of any single sport as a 
health and body builder, is never dead in California with 
such a number of public swimming baths at the disposal 
of all. Right here in San Francisco we have enjoyed two 
very nice baths for many years, the Lurline Baths, right in 
town, and the Sutro Baths at the beach. Now, however, a 
new one has sprung up, down in the Latin quarter and it 
is worthy of your patronage. It is the Crystal Palace 
Baths and has perhaps the most sanitary and up-to-date 
tank in the world. Watch for the meets there and you'll 
enjoy them. 

And last but not least, a little advice on light exercise. 
Did you ever stop to think what a great blood circulator 
it is in the early morning? Not too much of it to start; 
wake yourself up gradually, stretch a while. That allows 
the muscles to get fully awake. Then start in slowly and do 
your little daily dozen. Good health is worth a million 
dollars, so why not start the day with money in your 
pocket. 



January 24. 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



Archbishop Hanna 
Authorizes Holy Year 
Pilgrimage — 



The year 1925 will be featured 

by pilgrimages from all parts of 
the world to Runic, heeding the 
invitation of the Sovereign Pon- 
tiff in celebration of the Holy 
Year of Jubilee, which His Holiness, in a Bull issued on 
the Feast of the Annunciation, declared to the faithful. 
The conditions prescribed for pilgrims are as follows: 
Holy Communion; visits to the Basilicas of St. Peter, St. 
Paul, St. John Latern and St. Mary Major, with prayers 
for the intention of the Holy Father. It is necessary to 
visit each of the four Basilicas named at least once a day 
for twenty days (if a resident of Rome) or once a day for 
ten days if from abroad. 

Intending pilgrims from California are invited to join 
an Official Pilgrimage to be conducted under the auspices 
of the National Committee on Pilgrimages to Rome, having 
the sanction of His Grace, the Most Rev. E. J. Hanna, Arch- 
bishop of San Francisco. The itinerary schedules a de- 
parture from San Francisco June 20, sailing from New York 
June 27, arriving in New York on the return trip August 
16. In addition to the required ten days' visit in Rome, 
visits will be made to Lourdes, Naples, Milan, Florence, 
Avignon, Nice, Paris, London, Dublin, Cork and Killarney. 
Every arrangement has been made covering the tour, which 
will be personally conducted, thereby eliminating the usual 
difficulty of securing accommodations in Europe during the 
height of the season. Application for membership in this 
Pilgrimage should be made to James F. Moses, member of 
National Committee on Pilgrimage to Rome, 601 Market 
Street, San Francisco, Calif. 



Northern California Horse Show Association 

Herbert Woolf, millionaire sportsman of Kansas City, 
arrived Sunday in Oakland, bringing 12 of his prize horses 
in special American Express cars. The blue-blooded ani- 
mals were headed by "Moon Magic," winner of the Chicago 
International trophy last year, and several championships 
since 1923. This is the first consignment to arrive of nearly 
three hundred thoroughbred entries for the initial Northern 
California Horse Show, February 6th, to 10th inclusive. 
in the arena of the Oakland Auditorium. 

* * * 
Noah's Ark. 

A culinary equipment costing over $40,000 is to be in- 
stalled in Noah's Ark, at 93 Third avenue, San' Mateo, the 
new and unique cafeteria which will be open for public in- 
spection on Sunday afternoon, January 25th. The formal 
opening will take place Tuesday evening, January 27th. 

This whole establishment will be run on the most sani- 
tary and efficient lines, special machinery being provided 
for sterilizing ice boxes, steam tables and even the floors 
of the restaurant, including those of the storeroom and 
dining room. 

Culinary experts declare this equipment to be the equal 
of anything ever set up on the Pacific Coast, while the 
cuisine is pleasurably anticipated by everyone who has par- 
taken of real Southern style cooking. 

* * * 

East Bay Country Club 

I In -en-clad hills and the "pre-Spring" weather of the pa>t 

fortnight attracted many members to the estate of the East 
- ountrj nub in beautiful Crow Canyon, twenty miles 
from downtown Oakland. The last two week-ends, groups 
of enthusiastic golfer- played over the first nine holes com- 
pleted on the eighteen hole course that has been laid out 
■ >n a sporty range. 

The first womens' golf tournament, a sweepstake event 
will be held at the club. February 25th. An attractive list 
of trophies is being arranged for the day. I hie of the fea- 
tures of the- occasion will be a barbecue luncheon. 



K. of C. Bal Masque 

The "Casey" bal masque and pageant to be presented 
Saturday night, January 31 in the Civic Auditorium, is 
interesting virtually all Catholic societies of San Francisco 
and the bay cities, as the event will be the major Catholic 
charity social of the pre-Lenten season. General head- 
quarters have been established in rooms 303-304 Hobart 
building, where committees and sub-committees have been 
holding a series of conferences working out details for the 
function. A number of valuable prizes are to be offered 
for the most unique costumed couple, as well as group cos- 
tumed teams, and the latter is expected to attract a number 
of fraternal organizations to appear en masse at the func- 
tion. 



Mrs. Eleanor Egan Passes On 

A writer of note, and a lovable and interesting personality 
was lost to the world when Mrs. Eleanor Egan, wife of 
Martin Egan, of J. P. Morgan and Company, passed away 
in New York on January 17th, after a brief illness. 

She was the author of a number of books, the latest of 
which was "War in the Cradle of the World." She also con- 
tributed frequntly to magazines and had traveled exten- 
sively. The writer knew her in Manila, and will remember 
her sweetness and fascination for many a long day. 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS, FLUMES, 

PENSTOCKS, GASHOLDERS, SMOKE STACKS, ETC. 

San Francisco, Calif. Los Angeles, Calif. 

444 Market St. 5717 Santa Fe Avenue 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel— 771 to 777 Valencia Street, Bet. 18th and 19th Sts., 

San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



|| 




HARRY DIXON 

INTERPRETS 
YOUR IDEAS 

IX METAL 



241 GRANT AVE. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



rJ> 



H 



The January FUR SALE at Gassner's 

GASSXER STANDARDS very definitely estab- 
lish the exceptional importance of this occasion. 
All the Gassner Furs included — all the fur 
coats, all the fur wraps, all the fur jacquettes, all the 
fur neckpieces. 

Reductions to 50' , 

LOUIS GASSNER 

Incorporated 

112-114 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

"The new store that is 32 years old" 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 24. 1925 



Hollywood Gossip 

By Madeline Jamison 



WHERE TO DINE 



WE are promised by the leading producers, that in the 
coming year we will see fewer sex pictures on the screen 
and more like "Peter Pan," "The Thief of Bagdad," and 
"Ben Hur." That the public is tired of the sex type of 
production has been proved by the failure of such pictures 
to make good. Even "East of Suez," a story with great 
dramatic possibilities, has been cheapened and made com- 
monplace by too much sex. 

Pictures like "Anna Christie." "lie Who Gets Slapped, 
and "Omar the Tent-Maker," too, were financial failures be- 
cause thev were all over the ordinary public's head. 

Out-of-door pictures are predicted' for the future, not the 
type of hard-riding, gun-toting pictures that had such a 
vogue a few years ago, but pictures of the "Covered Wagon" 
and "Sea Hawk" kind. 

Almost all audiences are two-thirds women, seeking a 
few hours diversion from household cares or the humdrum 
of drab every-day life. Hard working wives and mothers 
like pictures'of gay social life with the stars wearing gor- 
geous clothes, beautifully furnished homes, servants and 
automobiles. Tired business men. shut up in their offices 
all day, like Western pictures or stories of adventure. Young 
people want love, of course, but not the flagrant sex kind, 
if they are normal, — and most of them are. In the dim 
light of the movie play-house they give their secret dreams 
full plav. They become, unconsciously, the hero or heroine 
of the story that is being depicted. Very few people have 
any ambitions to break up homes or to live through a 
thrilling illicit sex experience, even. In real life it would 
give them a headache, but they do like the vicarious thrill 
of a good clean love story, whether they are sixteen or sixty. 

It is rumored that Cecil de Mille left the Famous Players- 
Lasky corporation of which he has been director-general 
for the past twelve years, because he and Adolph Zukor, 
the president, could not agree on the type of pictures that 
the public wanted, but must people think it was not as 
simple as that, but the combination of a disagreement over 
a split of profits, and a desire on Mr. de Mille's part to be- 
come the head of a concern of his own. Mr. de Mille is 
silent about his future plans beyond the fact that he has 
a very- ambitious program planned and a schedule of stories 
and stars to appear in them in his independent career. 

It is known that he has been negotiating for the Thomas 
11. [nee Studio and also, that the United Artists are trying 
very hard to get him to join them. If he does he will be 
associated with such stars as Mary Pickford, Douglas Fair- 
banks. Norma Talmadge and Charlie Chaplin. Mr. de 
Mille's activities are not confined to pictures alone; he is 
said to be a director of three different banks in Hollywood 
and Los Angeles. 

It was announced some time ago that Betty Bronson, 
who was chosen to play "Peter Pan." was to be starred 
in a new picture, "The Little French Girl," but the latest 
reports are that the idea has been abandoned on account of 
the sex problem in the story. 



A bureau whose business it is to impart information of 
many kinds received a letter recently from a Chinese mer- 
chant in Pekin requesting a list of all firms in the United 
States manufacturing "male water-sheep." 

The letter was shown around as a curiosity until a sten- 
ographer undertook its interpretation. 

As a result of her efforts, a list of manufacturers of hy- 
draulic rams was dispatched, the girl was promoted and the 
Chinaman, it has been learned, was made happy. 



CAFE MARQUARD 




Adjoining Wilkes and Curran 

Theaters, Geary and Mason. 

Phone Prospect 61 

1925 REVUE 

Sparkling Entertainment 
DINING— DANCING 

After-Theater Suppers 
Superb Service 



Barbecue 

I hili Con < tirni- 

Coffee 




KnHi Marin* 

Tnmnles 

H roiled Steak* 



Red Bull Pit 

72 EDDY STREET, San Francisco 
JOE W. ANDERSON, Prop. Telephone Douglas 6198 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

THE MOST POPULAR RESTAURANT IN SAN FRANCISCO 
G5 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4536 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners, $1.25. Meals Served a la Carte. 

Also Regular French and Italian Dinners. 

Flab and Game a Specialty 




and tea from 3 to 5 



'*TSa: 



334 Sutter St. 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

1(3 Third Avrnur, SAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Conking 

Open From 

1 I :30 a. mi. to 2:00 p. m. 

5:80 p. m. tn s:::n p. m. 
Sundays and Holidays 
4:30 to 8:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 
Hnlf Block front HlKhwny 





BLANCO' 


S 








O'Farreli and I.nrkin Streets 


■•I.. 


Franklin 




No visitor should leave the city without 
in the finest cafe In America 


din 


ng 




Dinner, Week Days - 
Dinner, Sunday* and Holidays 


- 


: 


- 


75c 
$1.50 
*1.75 

■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 4 



The only real artistic place in the Latin Quarter. Bohemian 

dinner. 75c — served every evening. Saturday. Sunday and 

Holidays, $1.25. Dancing from 7 to 1 every evening. 

BEGIN'S BOLOGNA RESTAURANT 
240 Columbus Avenue Phone Sutter 8825 



Louis Cerles. Jean Barrere. John Plegth, Props. 

NEW SHARON GRILL 

Formerly Bergez-Frank's Old Poodle Dog, Bush Street 

35 NEW MONTGOMERY STREET 

Opposite Palace Hotel Phone Sutter 8008 



Mary Hereth Caroline Jones 

Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 2:30 



Douglas 7118 



January 24, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



Wheat and Chaff 

By Nathaniel Anderson 




N' 



X a tli an i el An tier sun 



•OTHING is more distres- 
sing than to hear of cases 
where children because of the 
just correction of their parents 
grow to the belief that those 
who are near them are their 
enemies, and that these chil- 
dren, to show decidedly they 
have been injured, resort to 
tragedy to tell their parents, 
their relatives, and the grown- 
up world generally just how 
they feel on the subject. It is 
hard for us to think we thus 
fail with our youth. And what, 
we wonder, is there to learn of 
their peculiarities in order to 
teach them who are their real 
friends? The young of this sort 
often destroy themselves, but to- 
day we have a terrible case where a wrongheaded, wilful 
girl killed her mother evidently because that mother wanted 
her child to take her pleasures like a rational, well-behaved 
girl should. Still, this awful youngster needs some help 
during her trial for murder, and we are glad to hear that the 
father and brother who were so determined, by reports, to 
leave her entirely alone, have made up their minds that there 
is a human duty due the child in the remains of her wrecked 

life. 

* * * 

We find a hearty second to a recent editorial entitled 
"As Others See Us." In England some cowboys in the 
show business in an imported rodeo emulated the cruel bull- 
fight of the Spaniards. It was at the interempire exhibition 
at Wembly where America was represented by the rope 
throwers who twisted the necks of bulls and threw them 
violently to the ground. 

The editorial we speak of, quotes Mrs. J. C. Graham of 
Bishopstoke, England, who complained that it .was hor- 
rible to learn that horses and steers were treated in the 
brutal manner as shown in the cheap heroics of the rodeo 
The writer of the article approves of the indignation oi 
Mrs. Graham in her protest of this savage treatment oi 
dumb creatures. We personally are glad that the authori- 
ties of the Wembly exhibition saw no fun in this American 

sport and stopped it. 

* * * 

We saw a man drink from stuff cm his hip, and it did 

not take long after imbibing to break up a respectable 
party, lie was the type who could not take his liquor 
without a devil's meanness coming out of him. If it were 
possible to have a nice prohibition amendment for him and 
his kind! \\ hat shall we say to this however; A wife tiles a 
complaint for divorce, and alleges drunkenness on the part 
of her husband, but also complain- that the man was 
meaner sober than drunk! 

* * * 

If you have not read the speech on a dog's faithfulness 
by the late Senator Vest, of Missouri, you should to find 
OUt how line and true it was, and why the judge at Houston, 
Texas, sentenced a boy who had been cruel to a dog to 
write five hundred times this "Eulogj of a Dog." It is an 
odd boy who must be punished for a trick like his. and we 
hope by the time he has finished his writing, he will re- 
member forever what he wrote 



"lie wanted me to leave my husband and five children 
and run away with him." lie didn't want much, and the 
very idea made Mrs. Ccsaria of South Boston angry, so 
much so, that she fired two shots at him, and seemed 
afterwards to be worried that she might have missed him 
— Frank Lucina. 

She couldn't get rid of him, she said, and it is safe to 
further say that he was one of those suitors that not only 
refuse to take "no" for an answer, but considers no cir- 
cumstances surrounding the object of his wild affections, 
does not care a rap about the happiness of the woman with 
whom he is infatuated — thinks of nothing but the fact that 
he wants her, body and soul, and usually ends in murdering 
the woman if continually rejected. Mrs. Cesaria shot first, 
and we think she has the right idea. 



When public officials begin to look around to find a way 
by personal sacrifice to save for the state, we are on the road 
to low taxes and economy. There was a debate the other 
day as to whether economy had been effected in this state 
during the last year. It was hard to tell at the end of the 
battle whether this was true or not, but saving and reduc- 
tion of expenses and taxes will come about with the right 
spirit and determination, and we admire the act of the new 
Warden at San Quentin, Frank J. Smith, in doing away 
with the job of prison chauffeur, giving the reason that he 
is a bachelor and does not need a chauffeur. Usually men 
in public service need about everything they can think 
of and get. 



Established 28 Years 

EXTRA HAIR P | ECES TO 
COVER THE BOB F0R 
EVENING WEAR 

NOW BEING SHOWN AT 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

815 Clement Street San Francisco 360 Geary Street 

2331 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley 
MR. AND MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 







asa de z^hCanana 

La Jolla, Cal. 

San: Diego County 



Southern California's new season 
hotel, located directly on the 
ocean shore on Coast Boulevard. 
100 rooms. 100 baths. Built in the 
Spanish Renaissance style. Has 
all of the up-to-date comforts of 
the modern hotels of today. Only 
strictly fresh products used on 
our table. Cuisine American. 
Kates from :>S.0O per day and up- 
ward. American plan. Special 
weekly and monthly rates. Write 
for illustrated folder to 

CASA DE MANANA 
La Jolla. Calif. 



_J 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 24, 1925 



FINANCIAL 

(Continued from Paee 11) 

— All divisions and districts will get new work and ad- 
ditions to meet the fast growing demands. In Shasta divis- 
ion $905,000 will be spent for a new substation at Cotton- 
wood and the lines that will bring additional power from the 
California-Oregon Company. The substations at Red Bluff, 
Roseville and Livermore are to be reconstructed. In the 
East Bay territory nearly a million and a half dollars will 
be spent in the construction of new substations. In the 
Sacramento district, Vaca-Dixon improvements, including 
the largest condenser ever constructed in California will 
cost $900,000. San Francisco additions to the new Marin 
substation will take $660,000 and $236,000 will be devoted 

to new feeder lines. 

* * * 

— The gas department will have an equally busy year, 
setting up generating equipment with a daily capacity of 
20,000,000 cubic feet and laying 600 miles of pipes. Addi- 
tional gas generating equipment will be installed at San 
Francisco, Oakland, San Rafael and Sacramento. A new 
gas holder is planned for Chico. 

* * * 

— Know the Palace Hotel? If you don't, your are a 
freak. 'Well, you have a chance of lending its owner money, 
for the use of which they will pay you over 5 l / 2 per cent 
every year. The loan is secured by a first mortgage on 
property valued at nearly eight million dollars, so you arc- 
on velvet. Ask George W. Lewis, 815 Kohl Building about 
this, and make it snappy if you want to get in on the deal 
before the interest paid gets less — through the price of the 

bonds getting higher. 

* * * 

— Get a copy of Housman's Review from 301 Montgom- 
ery street, when passing, or send a postal for it. It is issued 
every two weeks and will keep you posted on the security 
and commodity markets as no other easily digested source 
of information will. Specially, I recommend what it says 
about the oil situation. The average "expert" is talking 
through his hat and has been indulging in this form of 
amusement for some months past. Housman knows. 

* * * 

— If you want a sound investment, the value of which will 
appreciate, send to the Mortgage Sales Company, Under- 
wood Building, for particulars of the National Mortgage 
Company of California issue of stock. Ask to see Mr. Gree- 
ley, he knows more about the working of this busines than 
anyone I know. I am told there is an element of risk in 
mortgage investments, but when you are dealing with the 
type of men who run the show I am talking about, the risk 
is as small as the vision of the critics. 

* * * 

— If you want to be in the swim, consider irrigation 
bonds. And when your cogitation cap is on, call on Mason 
at Merchants Exchange Building. He knows all about irri- 
gation, knows its history, the undercurrents to be avoided, 
will see to it that you feel better for your venture. Ask 
about Vista Irrigation District 6s. 

* * * 

— If municipals appeal to you, counsult Heller, of Heller, 
Bruce & Co., Mills Building. He is the kind of specialist 
who has preserved his sanity — few have. If you have not 
time to call — the call of pleasure is sweet-toned — phone or 
write for a copy of the market letter he writes. 



TRADEMARK. -_- -jr f~^ . -t 

Af Motor Oils 




Are recognized by the highest authorities in engine 
building as the most economical, efficient and uniform In 
quality — 

A PURE PENNSYLVANIA PRODUCT 

VALVOLINE OIL COMPANY 

462 Bryant St., San Francisco 122 Center St., Los Angeles 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that a vigoroiiH brushing once or twice a day 1m 
taking: very good care of them. Brushing In only a part of the 
process. Many things can happen to your teeth which only n 
competent dentist can take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as you Imagine. A toothache means 
trouble; do not wait for the ache. Watch your teeth and guniN. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth sore? Do your gums bleed? Call In today 
and talk It over. Tt will cost nothing. My nerve blocking sys- 
tem blocks off all nerves and pain. It will please you. 

DR.W.W. H0AGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfield 335 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions! Crowns; Self Cleaning Bridges) 

Porcelain Work and Roofless Plates 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED AND GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates. 35c per day; ?7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage of Automobiles 



SANITARY DRINKING WATER 

For Homes, Offices and Factories. Quality Guaranteed 

KEYSTONE WATER COMPANY 

130 Russ St. Phone Hemlock 170 San Francisco 



ARE YOUR BRAKES SAFE? 

We Specialize on Brakes Only-— Flat Prices on All Cars 

S. F. BRAKE SERVICE 

ST. FRANCIS GARAGE, 1240 POST STREET 

(Bet. Van Ness Ave. and Franklin St.) 

Phone Prospect 1915 




TEL. FRANKLIN 3BSS 

Metal AVork Apper- 
taining to Automo- 
biles. — Oxy- Acetylene 
« e I tl I n b — Black- 
KitiithlnK. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



Income Tax Service 



Advice Given and Returns Made at Your Home, 
by Appointment. 

J. Leo Park 

230 Russ Building — 235 Montgomery Street 
Phone Garfield 5364 



January 24. 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



19 




By Antisthenes 



li'TpHERE is no need for Super- 
J. visor Shannon to go to Sacra- 
mento. He can have no more im- 
portant business in the city's interest 
there than he can in this." A worthy 
mouthful emptied by Supervisor Hay- 
den the other day apropos the super- 
visors' junketing expedition to the 
state capitol. We'll say he's quite cor- 
rect and in this connection why is the 
assistant clerk of the Board of Super- 
visors presently luxuriating in Sacra- 
mento at taxpayers' expense? If he's 
not necessary for performance of duties 
here, why continue his position in the 

city government? 

* * * 

James Ryan who robbed the Pacific 
Gas and Electric Company is really 
named Schmidt ; hence the enigma : 
why do desperados, prizefighters, etc., 
adopt Celtic pseudonyms in their avo- 
cations? If it's for the purposes of 
intimidation, the object is well served, 
but Lord help the masquerader, if a 
culprit who appears for trial at the 
hand of a Judge O'Brien, Sullivan or 
Dunn and the deception is uncovered ! 
Here the quality of mercy may logic- 
ally be strained. 

* * * 

On Catering to Our Guests 
The bill introduced by Senators 
Lewis and Taylor providing for the 
establishment of a state's prison in the 
vicinity of Los Angeles is commend- 
able. Of late we've been enrolling in 
our San Quentin and Folsom public 
institutions quite a few guests from 
the southern locality so why not save 
the State the long expensive haul. 
Also the rapidly swelling population in 
our penal settlements up hereabout is 
confronting us with the problem of 
what we shall do with the coming har- 
vest of reprobates. 

In the olden days before the sobby 
sister and her twin brother were in- 
Qicted on us we got rid of quite a few 
life takers via the route of the hempen 
noose, but, presently we are told about 
half of the incarcerated felons in Cali- 
fornia are murderers! Incident!} in 
line with the prevailing jelly-hearted 
treatment cutthroats and kindred ilk. 
the proposed southern pen might conic 
in handy as a winter resort for such of 
the pampered culprits who might com- 
plain of the rigors of climate around 
Folsotn prison; likewise their presence 
in the new locality would serve to alibi 
a splendid boost in the Los Angeles 
census. 



On Shopping Early 

A couple of years ago the properties 
of the Market Street Railway were ap- 
praised by City Engineer O'Shaugh- 
nessy at $27,000,000 ; — a week ago or so 
Fred Bullock, cost estimator, at the be- 
hest of the city government, found 
their present value to be $30,000,000. 
In computing the value of utilities a 
certain amount is deducted each year 
for depreciation ; this is mandatory but 
likewise, as in other going concerns, 
there is a steadily increasing value 
which, with improvements, must be 
taken into consideration when a price 
is set by the owner for consideration 
by a prospective purchaser. In the case 
of the Market Street Railway no re- 
cession from the price set is likely ; 
this property is not up for forced dis- 
posal ; it is first-class merchandise so, 
as in other businesses, it behooves the 
buyer — in this case the voters of the 
City and County of San Francisco — to 
shop early. 

* * * 

The new warden at San Quentin 
is reported to favor the establishment 
of a higher education institution at 
the penal colony, the preceptors to be 
inmates who have received college de- 
grees. As it has been said : the greater 
knowledge the greater rascal, we view 
the contemplated innovation with 
mixed emotions. Given what these fel- 
ons already know of cleverness in 
crime, will the schooling lead them 
into better, channels of endeavor when 
released, or, as is equally logical to 
suppose, will it make of them more 
dangerous criminals? 



A machine has been invented to 
wash the outside of railroad cars as 
they pass through it. 
* * * 

The pope's daily average of letters 
is 22,000, and these are dealt with by 
25 secretaries. 




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20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 24, 1925 



JjBI^n^TtfBLE 



By KEM 

"Fop some reason or other, we have blundered into a period 
in which the intellect is over-honored. We appear to be living 
in a period when people in general think that the intellect is a 
very wonderful faculty, while they pay comparatively little at- 
tention to the mental accomplishments of the sensibilities and 
emotions." — Clayton Hamilton. 

Clayton Hamilton in "Conversations on Contemporary 
Drama," tells us that it is "comparatively easy to cultivate 
the intellect," rather than "to teach people to look through 
magic casements," or to give them the "ideas men fight 
for . . . ideas of the sort that are sneered at by the 
intellectuals, ideas about home and mother, about honor, 
about some flag or other, about God. . . . Who would 
not rather have said, 'Lafayette, we are here,' than have 
been the first man in the world to prove that the whole is 
equal to the sum of its parts?' " In exemplification of the 
foregoing we find a horde of readers devouring the horde of 
books commended by the intellectuals demanding nothing 
more than that they be well-written. Many of Michael 
Arlen's books fall in this class, also Van Vechten's and 
Ben Hecht's, brilliantly written but lacking in ideals and 
inspiration. Stuart P. Sherman tells us in his very timely 
"My Dear Cornelia," that these same writers belong to the 
"Emetic School of Fiction," including also Mr. Hecht's 
"Spiritual Satellite, Mr. Maxwell Bodenheim," and stating 
that evidences of this same scholastic training are to be 
found in "a steady undertone running through the stories 
of Sherwood Anderson; the "Narrow House," and "Narcis- 
sus" of Evelyn Scott ; "Rahab" of Waldo Frank, and in 
Tames Joyce's . . . rolling odorous pandemonium. The 
normal, healthy-minded reader, he advises, after the stench 
of this sort of writings, will cry with King Lear: "Give me 
an ounce of civet, good apothecary to sweeten my imagina- 
tion!" 

"My Dear Cornelia," by Stuart F. Sherman, is well worthy 
a reading. The chapter from which the above has been 
quoted is but one of the many charming and enlightening 
conversations between "Cornelia" and Professor Sherman 
which delighted the readers of The Atlantic and are now out 
in book form. "The Tendency of the Modern Novel," "The 
Eighteenth Amendment," "Religion," "Marriage" and 
"Modern Girls," are wittily and wisely discussed by "Ameri- 
ca's leading literary critic of the penetrating vision," — ' 
Professor Sherman with charming "Cornelia, who walked 
smoothly and well in delectable regions far above the level 
of the rank-scented multitude." 

The Atlantic Monthly Press. $2.50. 

San Francisco feels proud over the success of her talented 
writer, Charles Caldwell Dobie, in winning the Harper's 
$750 second prize. Mr. Edward J. O'Brien rates Mr. Dobie 
amongst the three greatest short-story writers of the coun- 
try and publishes a story by him in the new 1924 O'Brien 
Collection of Short Stories. The O. Henry Memorial Cot 
lection will bring out his famous story "Horse and Horse." 

The Paul Elder Company gave a very successful party 
for their employees in their picturesque gallery, Tuesday 
evening, January 6th. As befitting a Book and Art Shop 
the program was of a distinctly literary and artistic nature. 
Mr. Paul Elder gave all a happy welcome in a few well- 
chosen words which was followed by music, both classical 
and "modern," by the celebrated California String Quartet 
under the able direction of Mr. Scott Elder; the soloist of 
the evening, Mrs. Carl Stevens of the Art Department 
sang "The Star" by Rogers — the words being a fragment 
from Plato and was repeatedly encored ; the short address 



on the Psychology of Salesmanship by Professor Maslin 
Hulme of Stanford University was both practical and 
humorously interesting; "Sympathy with — not for people 
was the secret of successful salesmanship," he told his 
appreciative audience, "and sympathy could be best acquired 
by reading Biography and Auto-biography." The eager- 
ness with which the book-sellers listened and the spirited 
dancing that followed, showing they could use their heels 
as well as their heads, augured well that customers of this 
unique Bookshop would have even more efficient and en- 
thusiastic service in the future. The live-jazz music for 
the dancing was furnished by the Elder Quartet under the 
direction of Mr. Paul Elder, Junior. 



Silence Is Golden 

Mother: "Betty, John brought you home very late last 
night." 

Betty: "Yes, it was late, mother. Did the noise disturb 
you?" 

Mother: "No, dear, it wasn't the noise. It was the 
silence. — Cornell Widow. 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

^PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 

239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



Make yourself at home at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tillmann Place, at 241 Grant Ave. 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Rare Books — First Editions — Fine Bindings 

Importations from Zachnsdorf. Root, Morrell, etc., of London 

Commissions in London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

Phone Kearny 5816 



Be Photographed This Year on Your Birthday 



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PRINCIPAL CITIES OF 

CALIFORNIA 



Oakland 

408 Mlh Street 

San Frnnchco 

41 Grant Avenue 



St. Mary's Academy 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 



For particulars address 
SISTER SUPERIOR 



Select Boarding and Day School Under the 
Direction of the Sisters of St. Dominic 



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fanuary 24, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



21 




ii/qVeyou 
HE/aRpiT? 



Not For Sale 

A five-year-old boy went with His mother to make a call. 
The lady of the house, being fond of children, told him to 
ask his mother to let her have him. 

"Don't you think your mother would let me buy you?" 
she asked. 

"No," answered the little fellow ; "you haven't got enough 
money." 

"How much would it take" she continued. 

"A hundred pounds," said the boy, promptly, as if that 
would settle the matter once for all. 

"Oh, well, then," said the lady, "I think I can manage 
it. If I can, will you come and stay with me?" 

"No," was the reply. "Mamma wouldn't sell me anyhow. 
There are five of us, and she wouldn't like to break the set." 

* * * 

A young married woman anxious to inform her girl friend 
of the arrival of her first child, decided to send a telegram 
to her. Being of a religious turn of mind, she wrote: "For 
unto us a child is born. Isaiah ix., 6." When the telegram 
was opened the girl friend ran to her mother and said, 
"Joan's got a baby, mother. His name's Isaiah, and he 
weighs nine pounds six ounces." 

* * * 

Friend — -"I say, your wife looks charming. Her dress is a 
poem." 

Author (who foots the bill) — "Much more than that, old 
man ; ten poems and a short story." — Passing Show. 

* * * 

Our inimitable contributor, Mr. F. W. Thomas, has just 
had another book published — "Merry-Go-Round" (Put- 
nam). To celebrate the occasion, I asked him to send me 
something amusing for my page, and this was what 
resulted : 

"I don't think people realize how much punctuation 
counts — how much it can change the meaning of a sentence. 
Neither did I until the other day I came across the follow- 
ing in an old paper: 'Lord Palmcrston then entered on his 
head, a white hat upon his feet, large but well-polished 
boots upon his brow, a dark cloud in his hand, his faithful 
walking-stick in his eye, a menacing glare saying nothing.' " 

* * * 

It was a sultry afternoon, and Henderson, of Henderson 
and Henderson, carpet importers, leaned flabbily against 
his goods. 

Two women entered the shop, and in the arms of one 
there basked a crowing infant. 

"Can you," one of them said, "can you please show us 
some carpets?" 

"Madame, I can," he answered. And he did. 

Again and again he did. Roll after roll he spread before 
their critical eyes. The perspiration rolled down his cheeks. 
He gasped, lie tottered, he staggered. 

At last: "Don't you think," said one, glancing at her 
watch, "that it is time to leave?" 

"Not quite, dear," said her friend. "We've plenty of time 
to spare to catch the train, and baby does so love to see him 

roll them out !" 

* * * 

Coming from Key West 
Miss Tourista: "1 suppose you have been on the boat so 
long you are accustomed to sea 

Cad Coles: "1 wasn't even looking. Miss." 



Club Beaux Arts 
Paintings that vibrate with the compelling understanding 

of our Western country — that is Maynard Dixon's contri- 
bution to California art; hut that is not all. If you have 
ever stood in the presence of desert or mountain and felt 
its spirit — its akiness to the the infinite, you will instantly 
recognize that Dixon, in his recent canvases has caught the 
essence of desert or mountain, has caught and translated 
it for us. To those accustomed to the inoffensive sweetness 
in pictures, the Dixon exhibit at the Club Beaux Arts may 
seem a bit arbitrary : no vague feeling, no casual senti- 
mental landscapes, but he who lingers, soon discovers that 
poetic imagination is the keynote to many of the pictures ; 
for instance. "Winter Moon" ; "Evening and Afterthought" ; 
and "The Desert Moon," are all paintings that awaken and 
satisfy imaginative thought. 

Then there are decorative compositions built from vigor- 
ous sketches ; direct interpretations of Nature. 

San Francisco art lovers cannot help but feel that this 
exhibition at 116 Maiden Lane, stimulates and fascinates. 
It will continue until February 1st. 
* '* * 

Subscriber — " 'One Wife Too Many.' The story of a biga- 
mist, I suppose?" 

Much-Married Library Assistant (absent-mindedly) — "Not 
necessarily, madam." 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE 

The Mineral Development Company, Location of Principal Plnee of 

ItUNineMN, San Francisco, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a regular meeting of the directors 
held on the 13th day of January. 1925. an assessment of one-half cent 
per share was levied upon the issued capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in legal money of the United States, to the Sec- 
retary, at the office of the Company, Room No. 237 Monadnock Build- 
ing. San Francisco. California. 

Any stock on which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 20th 
day of February. 1925, will be delinquent and advertised for sale at 
public auction, and unless payment is made before will be sold on 
Friday, the 20th day of March, 1925. to pay the delinquent assessment. 
together with costs of advertising and expense of sale. 

M. J. SEELY Secretary, 
2:;7 .Monadnock Building. San Francisco, California. 



"Bits 

of Fashion" 



from the world's style centers will prove attractive to 
our women readers. There are interesting pictures of 
"The Fuss in Egypt," and some notables from the 
"U. S. A." 



"Masterpieces 
of Art" 

Reproduces many of the world's art treasures. There 
are interesting views from "Around the World"; views 
taken "On the Cattle Range." and a clever front page. 
"Coquetry." Don't miss the 

Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 24. 1925 




The longer p t 

Qswells 

-^NAUONAl CREST 

offee 




-the better it gets- 



2^ 

MnounWa 



GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 

1.800,000 cups were served at the Pan- 
ama Pacific International Exposition 



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PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from Page 7) 

with all of its scenes laid on a steamer 
and the atmosphere of ocean travel has 
heen carefully and painstakingly ob- 
served not only by the producers, but 
also by the players themselves. The 
play is one long gleeful jaunt over the 
briny, with an occasional storm of roar- 
ing laughter. Henry Duffy in the star 
role, which was specially written for 
him, is at his best. He never loses a 
chance for coined}' and it is interesting 
to watch his work as he keeps his au- 
dience chuckling. 

"Just Married" gives us an oppor- 
tunity to see Dale Winter in a new and 
interesting" characterization and she is 
as charming and delightful in it as 
ever. 



Wisps of Wisdom 

The parent's life is the child's copy- 
book. 

Habits are the only cobwebs that 
grow into cables. 

^Yhen a man aims at nothing he sel- 
dom misses his target. 

Revenge may be sweet, but seeking 
it sours one's disposition. 

If you are doing good work, don't 
worry ; somebody will find it out. 

Optimism parts the clouds and sorts 
out the tangles, and costs nothing. 

Faith in something and enthusiasm 
for something make life worth living. 

We ma)' not fill pulpits, but each of 
us lives some kind of sermon every 
day. 

Be warned against nursing revenge- 
ful thoughts; they are apt to develop 
sharp stings. 



Don't move the other fellow's car 
in order to make room for parking, 
Any person who molests another per- 
son's car without proper permission to 
do so is guilty of a misdemeanor. This 
law at first thought may seem of little 
importance, but when one considers it 
in the light that it was passed with 
the view of protecting motor cars from 
thieves the wisdom of such legislation 
is apparent. 



California Poetry Club. 

The California Poetry Club ( Mrs. N. 
Lawrence Nelson, president), will hold 
i t s monthly social gathering on 
\\ ednesday evening, January 2S, at 
Sequoia Hall, in Washington street. 
Several of its masculine members have 
taken the program in hand, but they 
refuse to divulge what their scheme of 
action is going to be. The hosts for 
the evening include: Mr. Irwin Ayres. 
Mr. Madefrey Odhner, Mr. John Burke 
and Mr. Harold Berkheim. 











Tel. Prospect 6979 




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San Francisco, Calif. 


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in San Francisco free of charge. Re- 
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case of damage by collision. 10 per 
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Established 1S55 
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NOTICE OP ANNUAL MEETING OK 
STOCKHOLDERS 

Notice is hereby given that the annual 
meeting of the stockholders of PATTERSON 
RANCH COMPANY, a corporation, will be 
held ;ii the offlee of the corporation, to-wit: 
the "Directors Room," in the office of the 
Union Trust Company of San Francisco, al 
the junction of Market and O'Farrell streets 
and Grant avenue, San Francisco, California, 
mi TUESDAY, February 1". 1926, al the hour 
.a' ten o'clock a. Qi., for the purpose of elect- 
ing directors for the ensuing year ami 111 
transaction of any other business which may 
properly come before the meeting". 

W. W. Patterson. Secretary. 



Time 




Card 



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motorists the shortest and most direct means of transporta- 
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'Saturdays. Sundays, Holidays — Extra Trips During Heavy 
Traillc. fSundays and Holidays only. 

AVEN J. HANFORD, Pres. and Gen. Mgr. 



[COOKS] 



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TICKETS ISSUED 

To All 

PARTS OF THE WORLD 

INCLUSIVE INDEPENDENT TOURS 
ITINERARIES FURNISHED 

CRUISES SUPREME 

MEDITERRANEAN 
Leaving New York January 24, 1925 

ROUND THE WORLD 
Leaving New York January 22, 1925 

Write for Booklets 



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San Francisco 



MacRORIE-McLAREN company 



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Engineers, 



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Garden Specialists 



Phone 
Douglas 4442 

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before You 'Build 
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Sharon Building 

Exhibit of 
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BUILDING MATERIALS 
HOME EQUIPMENT 



SMain Floor 

55 New Montgomery Street, San Francisco 

Opposite "Palace Hotel 



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FOOT OF HYDE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
WINTER SCHEDULE 

TIME TABLE 

EFFECTIVE OCTOBER 15, 1924 



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California Advertiser 



ATURDAY, JANUARY 31, 1925 



1GELI 




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e^ 7 " Fashions 

From Fifth Avenue 
New York 

The identical fashions now being 
worn by trie .New York fashion- 
ables and shown lor the first time in 

San Francisco, Cal. 

At The 

St. Francis Hotel 



JVLonday 

FeL 9th 



JL uesday 
FeL 10,/, 



Wednesday Thursday E rid ay 

FeL llth FeL 12th FeL 13th 

Also (clothes Jov Infants, C hildren ana (jtrls 



EfltblUtiad July 10. 1636 





5TER 

Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

Jr.. from 1SS4 to 1925. Is now printed and published by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 235 Montgomery St., San Francisco, California. Telephone 

Douglas 6S53. Entered at San Francisco, California, Post Office as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C. London, 

England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year, $5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 




Vol. CVI 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JANUARY 31, 1925 



No. 5 



— To speak evil of the absent is not only unjust, but 

cowardly. 

* * * 



— Our own Ben Franklin said : 
virtues, tbvself for thv vices." 



"Search others for their 



— They are at it again as regards King Tut's tomb. His 
shade no doubt has concluded long ago that "there is no 
rest for the wicked." 

* # * 

— The famous pianiste, Miss Leginska, is still missing in 
New York at this writing. We would have given thanks 
if some of the pianistes we have heard had suffered the 
same fate! 



— Prohibition, one of the most puerile laws ever passed 
in any country, is not only responsible for several new 
crimes on the calendar, but also for a lack of respect on the 
part of members of the younger generation (especially the 
foreign element), for the government under which they 
live. Just as long as contempt of law is practiced and men 
can coin thousands of dollars in the bootlegging game, 
the work of "Americanization" will be futile. 



— The brutal treatment of children at "Hickory Hall," Oak- 
land (only one case out of hundreds where public institutions 
have used cruel methods in their dealings with babies), proves 
the utter fallacy of ever conforming to some of the phrases 
in the child labor law, which is at this writing creating nation- 
wide furore. There is no love equal to mother love ; no pa- 
tience so enduring, and to take the child from its natural 
mother, to "nationalize" it — as some of the communists sug- 
gest, is only giving an opportunity to institution officials to 
fatten on public taxes, and to (as in this instance) indulge the 
cruelty that is latent in the natures of a great number of men 
and women. 



— "There are no bargain sales in the business of life, but 
this being the stocktaking season, it is no bad thing for hu- 
manity to follow the fashion, to occupy itself with retrospect 
and prospect, to count its losses and gains." says the Saturday 
(English) Review. "Every year since the war ended the 
World has had to defer its hopes. What will 1925 offer to 
console the heart made sick? ... In our own country 
the past year has seen certain material improvements; trade 
has shown some upward tendency . . . but although the 
mental attitude of the patient shows a change for the better, 
it still lacks the spirit, the faith, essential to recovery. . . . 
To cure the body we must first cure the mind. The soul of 
the age is awry." 



— Do you ever realize how much color and interest you 
lose in life when you limit yourself to what you consider 
is your particular class? Associating with any certain 
clique of people has the effect on your mentality that travel- 
ing in a circle would have upon your body. No change 
of scene, no gleam of originality reaches you ; your view- 
point is not widened an iota; your prejudices remain the 
same. Drop your silly tinsel cloak of conventionality for 
an hour or so and put on the plain garb of the "man in the 
street ;" rub elbows with the proletariat, and return home 
refreshed and enriched. 

— Dorothy Ellingson promises to become a national fig- 
ure, which may go down to posterity as an awful example 
of a sequence of our jazz-mad age. Jazz, of which Luther 
Burbank says: "It has come up out of the jungle, and so 
have we, but we've been a long time getting away from it — 
If we give it too much sway, it will drag us down to the 
level of the tom-tom and the naked savage that is its in- 
spiration." 

* * * 

— And again, in speaking of the Ellingson case, he says : 
"We are everyone of us made up of grandmothers and 
grandfathers, and great-great-grandmothers and great- 
great-grandfathers, as far back as creation, and sometimes 
one of these grandfathers rises within us and tries to make 
us do something that we know is wrong . . . and it 
depends upon our self-control whether grandfather rules 
the situation or we do." An old saying comes to mind 
in corroboration of these sentiments: "We are all vehicles 
in which our ancestors are riding." 

* * * 

— In spite of much publicity and advocation of cleaner 
streets, the highways and byways of our "good gray city" re- 
main as dirty as ever. Expectorations make the sidewalks 
slimy with the menace of various diseases, and one has to 
indeed "watch one's step" when walking abroad. European 
cities, in particular, Dutch and German cities, have a way of 
contending with this evil that insures sanitary conditions. 
How do they do it? Cannot our Board of Public Works or 
other city fathers find out the secret? 

* * * 

— Hear the wise words of Luis H. Bebayle: "The more 
experience I have of life, the more I am convinced of the 
necessity of discretion and prudence. Light or impudent 
words and judgments have cooled affections, slain friendships 
and at times dug unfathomable abysses: while discreet silence 
in guarding secrets and excusing defects has prevented -can- 
dais and caused to be prolonged a harmony and cordiality 
that we should have regretted to lose and that we enjo\ 
in satisfaction afterward in the course of life. . . . We 
ought not to demand, an impossible sanctity, which we our- 
selves do not possess. We have to do with men. we are not 
dealing with angels : and tolerance, benevolence and even mercy 
are neces^arv in our commerce with our fellows." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 31, 1925 




President Coolidge at Washington and 
Lighten Taxes Governor Richardson at Sacramento, as 

executives, are confronted with the same 
problem, the most harrassing of all their troubles and the 
most pressing upon the business of the community. It is 
being recognized by both federal and state governments 
that the burden of taxation has become very nearly intol- 
erable and that the weight upon the resources of the com- 
munity through taxation, must be stopped if we are to pro- 
gress. The country has been and is very prosperous and 
these attacks upon the moneys of the citizens have passed 
without great protest. But both the President and the Gov- 
ernor know what they will produce in the long run and are 
sternly voicing their disapproval and dismay. Still the 
politicians, with the impudence which from time immem- 
orial has marked their kind, cry for more and greater ex- 
penditure. At the present time the cost of government in 
the United States for local state and federal purposes is 
about $8,000,000,000, or $70 per capita, which amounts to 
$350 for a family of five. The tax payers of California in 
county, municipal, state and federal taxes, paid practically 
as much as the value of all the raw products of the State in 
fruit and farming in 1923. With all this, the indebtedness 
does not diminish; on the contrary, it increases by leaps. 
In 12 years we increased our state debt from $10,000,000 to 
$76,000,000. The same thing holds good all over the ci iun- 
try. Is it any wonder that the President views the ex- 
penditures and the rapid growth of indebtedness with 
some perturbation and that his views are seconded by the 
Governor of this State? 



It is a curious fact that there is not a 
Harbor Control single representative of the City of San 

Francisco on the Harbor Board which has 
the control of the waterfront of our city. There are three 
members, one of whom is from Berkeley, another from 
San Rafael and yet another from Ukiah. These members 
fix the tolls, make the rules, plan the docks, arrange as to 
the type and place of the respective docks and wharves and 
carry out all the manifold activities connected with the 
trade of the port with the outside world. We do not say 
that they do it badly. On the contrary, they have done and 
are doing it very well and we took the opportunity, a week 
or two ago, of echoing the praise of the Governor on their 
achievements. But, after all, the port is San Francisco, it is 
not the State of California. The trade is due to the loca- 
tion of this city and is not at all the product of any state 
action. We, the people of this city, have built up the port 
and we have no voice in the administration of its local 
affairs. If we want to make any improvements on a large 
scale, we cannot do it ourselves. We must go to the State 
for permission to issue bonds. All the proceeds of the 
trade, tolls and wharfage dues, go into the coffers of the 
State and not into those of the city in which the docks are 
situated. We are thus in a peculiarly disadvantageous pos- 
sition. Los Angeles owns her own port and is not hampered 
in development by the exigencies of state politics. We 
alone are bound and held in the grip of a state political 
system because the politicians find in the Harbor Board a 
political machine with which they can use patronage and 
reward followers. It is needless to say that all this is 
crippling the advance of the port. Foreign trade is being 
built up with rapidity and new measures will shortly have 
to be taken to handle the increased volume. Under these 
conditions it is almost ludicrous that we should not have 
even one representative on the board. At the present 
session of the legislature an effort will be made totransfer 
the control of the port from the State to the City and such 
a measure should have the earnest support of those who 
understand the present conditions. 



Really, the condition of the calen- 
A Congested Calendar dar of the federal court is nothing 

short of disgraceful ! There are no 
less than 3500 cases to be disposed of. It is evident that 
with such a number of cases in arrears, no substantial 
justice can be done. The citizens are not given the legal 
service which is their's by right. The defendants who, 
after all, are human beings and have the constitutional 
guarantees back of them, are deprived of their essential 
rights to a speedy and fair trial. So great is the congestion 
that two additional judges, Hon. Robert S. Bean of Port- 
land and Hon. George M. Bourquin of Butte. Montana, have 
been called to help our local judges with the burden of the 
calendar. Out of the cases, twenty-five hundred are for 
violation of the Volstead act alone. There are a thousand 
cases, moreover, which include violations of the national 
banking act, another new class of crimes ; frauds on the 
naturalization acts, which the stringency of new laws on 
immigration and naturalization, makes another new class 
of crimes. More than all in immediate importance is the 
case of the alleged rum-runner, the ship Quadra, which, in 
itself, is a case of the very highest importance and is an 
international matter of the first magnitude. Of course, 
this last case is also due to new legislation and arises from 
a new treaty, to look at the calendar carelessly one might 
readily assume that the community was getting worse and 
that crime was on the increase. When we regard it how- 
ever, with any degree of care, we see that the mass of crime 
is new crime, that more than three thousand people are 
going on trial for offenses which were not offenses five 
years ago and that the community has to stand the incon- 
venience and the defendants must put up with the suffering 
for doing things that were formerly quite all right. 



We are, of course every year re- 
Our Lovely Spring minded that the East is under snow 

and that our dear beautiful part of 
the country is basking in sunshine and at the worst is en- 
livened by gentle showers. But it is doubtful if those of 
us who remain to sojourn in the city are at all aware of 
the miracle which is going on all over the country side. It 
is true that a trip to Lands End will show the Marin shores 
grown very gentle. Those whose sight is good and per- 
ceptions delicate may already feel that change in color, 
which the coming of wild flowers makes in the expanse, 
which a few weeks ago, was nothing but pure green. In a 
week or two the hills about Sausalito will be enchanted. 
Larkspur, fleur de lys and scores of other spring fairies 
will make a carpet of oriental gorgeousness and of much 
more delicate beauty than human looms have ever com- 
passed. Already down the Santa Clara valley the acacias 
are in bloom. Never have we seen any country side more 
entrancing, not even in the Riviera itself. The California 
swelling hills are indescribably sweet and tender, with a 
touch of blue that recalls insensibly something which at 
first slips the mind, until it flashes upon one, that it was 
just such a blue that lent enchantment to the hills around 
.Wissi. The fruit blossoms are coming out in some places, 
notably in Carmel valley. This is too early and the ex- 
perts place the blame upon the drought of last year. But 
wdio can tell of the beauty of the newly turned earth where 
the ploughing has made a new note in the surrounding 
green; of the incomparable grace and lightness of acacia 
against the distant hillsides; of the glint of the yellow of 
mustard in a sea of translucent green, and behind the purple 
brooding mountains? Truly, we are fortunate people here. 



January. 31, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISKk 



A Burden of Laws 

< )nce Albert Beveridge was a politician, now, owing to 
the lucky accident of defeat he has joined the ranks of the 
sagacious, for it is a very sad fact for politicial democracies 
that sagacity and politics are mutually incompatible. He 
is an authority on the life and works of one of the very 
greatest Americans, John Marshall, whose appointment as 
Chief Justice of the United States was made one hundred 
and twenty-four years ago. It was at a dinner commemora- 
tive of that event that Ex-Senator Beveridge delivered an 
address which for sheer common sense and real bravery 
should give him a pre-eminent position among benefactors 
of his country and true patriots. He said that we are 
overburdened with legislation, federal, state and local. He 
declared that the administration of the laws has become 
"peremptory, insolent and autocratic," that officials have be- 
come "vexatious tyrants and citizens cringing subjects." 
He said : "The nation and every state are well nigh smoth- 
ered with multitudes of laws. No human being knows how 
many statutes are hidden behind the forbidding covers of 
thousands of volumes that contain the acts of congress and 
of the legislatures. No human being knows even the num- 
ber of city ordinances, much less the import of them." Then 
he hits with real discernment at the root of much of the 
evil which is so bitterly lamented today and of the lawless- 
ness which apparently afflicts so large a portion of our peo- 
ple. He says: "We complain of lawlessness, but is not 
excess legislation a basic cause of lawlessness? How can 
anyone obey every law when nobody knows or can know 
how many laws there are or what they command or for- 
bid?" That is unanswerable. There is no doubt that we 
have an itch for legislation which will prove to be a very 
serious malady and may be constitutionally injurious to our 
country. As a politician, we have no great admiration for 
Mr. Beveridge, but as a social diagnostician he seems to 
have force and perception. With all of his sagacity, how- 
ever, he can think of nothing but a wholesale repealing and 
a sudden wholesale repealing is summed up in the ugly and 
impossible word, revolution. 



any acknowledgment, but they took our share of the occu- 
pation-payments, and are constantly demanding, as a sorl 
of right, that we advance further sums for rehabilitation. 
All the time some of them are spending large sums in 
bloated armaments and there arc unprecedented numbers 
of armed men in Europe. It is very ridiculous. 



The French Debts 

Some ill feeling is resulting from recent speeches in the 
French Senate which would appear to show a tendency on 
the part of a large section in French politics to ignore, if 
not actually to repudiate, the indebtedness due us from 
France on account of the war. The whole matter is very 
involved and is full of all sorts of evil potentialities. The 
recent statement of the President to the effect that better 
terms might be granted France than were allowed to Eng- 
land has brought about a very spirited reply from that 
country and it appears to be the impression among British 
statesmen that any such discrimination in favor of another 
country, as against (ireat Britain, would be intolerable, in 
view of the fact that no other country has even made a 
beginning of paying. The mere suggestion has, in fact, 
caused the British government to begin pressure on France, 
Italy, Rumania and other countries which are indebted to 
it. Thus there is general feeling of irritation and alarm 
throughout Europe, for these latter countries, being pressed 
by the United States and Britain simultaneously, find them- 
selves in a quandary, from which they cannot see any 
escape. There is no doubt that debts are owing; there is 
no doubt that the United States must collect on these debts, 
as soon as can be done: because our government owes its 
own people the money that was advanced for the support 
of these nations in war. No one can accuse this country of 
being ungenerous in the matter. On the contrary, we have 
been very lenient and very unselfish, as the fact that we 
have paid all the costs of our army of occupation in Ger- 
many very clearly shows. The money was paid by the 
Germans for that army of occupation, but we got none of it. 
Our European friends not only remained in our debt without 



Holy Year in Rome 

In ancient times, strange scenes were witnessed during 
the Jubilee year, when all Catholic Europe was afoot, travel- 
ing with knapsack and staff over the many roads that led to 
Rome. In those ages North and South America lay far be- 
yond the seas, undiscovered and unknown, but their turn 
was to come in later centuries and the Jubilees of 1875 and 
1900 witnessed thousands of Americans and penitential 
mien, throughout the streets of Rome. 

Owing to the methods of greater ease and comfort, which 
have been devised in the past quarter of a century for cros- 
sing over the land and water, there will be thousands of 
Americans wishing to visit Rome this year. In recognition 
of the services rendered to the Holy See in facilitating travel 
to the Holy Sanctuaries of Europe and the pilgrimage 
shrines of the world, His Holiness Pope Pius XI, following 
the example of his illustrious predecessor, Benedict XV, has 
deigned to grant to the firm of Thos. Cook & Son a testi- 
monial of his sovereign consideration, permitting them to 
use the Coat of Arms of His Holiness on all documents and 
programs which they issue and has appointed them official 
travel agents for the Holy See. 

Thos. Cook & Son have arranged for many itineraries all 
of which include ten days in Rome. The principal Pilgrim- 
age from San Francisco will leave here on June 20th over 
the Santa Fe lines to Chicago, thence via Niagara Falls to 
New York, sailing on the Cunard Line Cabin Steamer "An- 
dania," June 27th, visiting Paris, Lucerne, Milan, Venice, Flor- 
ence, Rome, Naples, Genoa, Nice, Lourdes, London, Dublin, 
Killarney, Cork, returning from Cobh on Cunard Line Steamer 
"Carmania," August 9th. Application for membership to 
this party should be made to either Mr. James F. Moses, 
Member National Committee, 601 Market Street, or Thos. 
Cook and Son, 128 Sutter Street. 



Progress Versus Prejudice 

The electorate in general, partly through past experience 
which has rightly or wrongly left an antagonistic impres- 
sion in the wake of events, is somewhat prejudiced against 
corporations. In the case of the Market Street Railway — 
in reference to its purchase by the city — some of our people 
are inclined to hearken back to the era of those violent car 
strikes, the exasperating necessity of our trudging the 
streets or piling into vehicles of every description to get to 
our tasks and the questionable granting of traction fran- 
chises during the Schmitz-Ruef regime. This attitude on 
our part is not an intelligent one. especially if it is allowed 
to stand in the way of general civic advancement. There 
is no question in the minds of our citizens as to the advis- 
ability — the necessity — of a united railway system and one 
municipally owned. As at present it is a case of three sys- 
tems, duplicating service in several instances and totally 
neglecting it in others — this to the loss of revenue in both 
cases t.i the companies operating and to the detriment of 
citizens and community. As it is not thinkable that preju- 
dice founded on mistakes long since rectified should operate 
to bar the path of progress, so it is hardly probable the 
electorate could allow errors of other years to militate 
against their taking hold of a proposition that will be of 
benefit to them individually and collectively. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 31, 1925 




>IMSURE'SWW 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

lorn Moore. 




By Katherine Schwartz 
Formerly of the "Chicago Tribune" 




OPERA lovers are an- 
ticir. 



Curran 

icipating with de- 
fht the annual visit of 
the San Carlo Grand 
( >pera Company to the 
Curran Theater for a two 
weeks' engagement, be- 
ginning Monday, Febru- 
ary 2. 

Prominent among the 
list of artists who will ap- 
pear under the direction of 
Fortune Gallo, are Alice 
Gentle, Tamaki Miura, 
Anne Roselle, Bianca Sar- 
oya, Manuel Salazar, 
Mario Basiola and many 
others. The music -will 
be under the direction of 
Fulgenzio Guerrieri. 
In addition to this, the engagement will be of interest 
to San Francisco because of the fact that on Tuesday Eve- 
ning, February 10, Mine. Stella Raymond- V ought will 
sing in "Traviata." Many of her friends and admirers, who 
know of her only in the concert field in a managerial ca- 
pacity, will await her debut in the operatic field with great 
interest. 



Mine. Stella iwtymond-VonsM 



Maria Ivogun 

What was perhaps, one of the greatest treats of a season 
that has brought us many famous artists, both instrumen- 
talists and vocalists, was the appearance of Maria Ivogun, 
at the Scottish Rite Hall Monday evening. 

From one so well known and so well recommended for 
her ability to do the difficult things well, she yet proved 
herself the great artist by singing the simpler and better 
known songs with simplicity and distinction. 

It was a great treat for the artists present, and a valuable 
less. ,n for the students to hear her in the very difficult Mo- 
zart and Brahms numbers. Such perfect diction and in- 
tonation is seldom heard even in the greatest singers. Her 
coloratura work was almost perfect, and her graciousness 
in the lighter and better known works, certainly is a lesson 
that more concert artists should achieve. 

A capacity audience was loath to leave, and she re- 
sponded with most delightful encores, chief of these were 
the "Blue Danube Waltz" by Strauss, and the well known 
aria from "Mignon". 



Orpheum 

Well! Well! What memories the names. Weber and 
Fields conjure up! They are returning to San Francisco 
and will be the headliners at the Orpheum next week. 

This is surely an outstanding event, as they made their 
debut on the Orpheum Circuit here some thirty-five years 
ago. Then too, it is the forty-seventh anniversary as a 
stage team. 

In addition there will also be seen Mme. Bernice De Pas- 
quali, internationally famous prima donna, in a special pro- 
gram of operatic numbers; Dave Ferguson, well known 



character comedian, in "The Lucky Stiff"; Powers' Danc- 
ing Elephants ; Lew Brice, brother of the famous Fanny 
Brice, in "Stick to Your Dancing"; Margit Hegedus, Viol- 
iniste, with Otto G. Schlaff at the piano; Stake Patterson 
and Laina Cloutier in "Three Stages of Love" and the 
team of Mac Rae & Clegg presenting "The Champion Lady 
Cyclist of the World". 



Imperial 

Cosmopolitan's superb production of "Janice Meredith", 
starring Marion Davies, is built around the most colorful 
period in American history — the Revolution. 

All the great events of the Revolution unfold before the 
eyes — Washington Crossing the Delaware, Paul Revere's 
Ride, The Battle of Trenton, The Boston Tea Party, the 
British surrender at Yorktown, and other important events 
in the history of that time. 

Aside from the delightful love story which runs through 
the story, every school child should see this picture. It 
makes a living story of one's history book. 

It is a lavish production throughout — some S200.000 hav- 
ing been spent on costumes alone. Marion Davies wears 
some twenty gowns, all designed especially for her by 
Gret! Urban. Miss Davies has never been seen to better 
advantage than in this stirring story. 

In connection with this great picture, Ray Paige and 
his "Club Alabam" jazz orchestra made their debut, and 
not only in their concert numbers, but also in their reading 
of (he splendid score accompanying the picture, scored a 
decided hit. 



Strand 

"Papa Loves Mama" has to do with two honeymoon 
couples who get all mixed up on their wedding trip, thus 
giving Will King and his company plenty of opportunity 
fi t comedy. 

Howard Evans has staged some very good numbers this 
week, notably "Lady O' Dreams", featuring Bob Reid, 
Clara Larinoff and the beauty chorus. In the French 
group, Will Aubrey and James Ellard make quite a hit with 
their ad lib verses sung to the tune of that old song of 
war times. "Hinky Dinky Parle Vou". Bessie Hill steps 
out of her role as one of the brides long enough to put over 
in her inimitable manner, "Me and My Boy Friend" and 
"1 Get More Love from This Dummy", assisted by Ellard 
and Reid. 

Alma Astor was given a rousing reception, this being 
her opening week after a long absence from this company. 

Hermie King and his men give a very pleasing concert 
called "In An Indian Village" in which torn toms, navajo 
rugs, Indian pottery, etc. supply the background. 

Next week this popular company will be seen in "I >li. 
Behave" in which the} - are featuring Alma Astor. 



San Francisco Symphony 

It would seem as though San Francisco music lovers know 
instinctively when a particularly good program i>- to he given. 
The Curran Theatre was crowded to absolute capacity to hear 
the wisp of a girl, Erna Ruhenstein play the very beautiful 



January, 31, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Amusements 

m:xt wekiv 



ALCAZAR 1 Henry Dully Players 

O'Farrell nr. Powell j "Just Married" 



ALEXANDRIA 
18th and Geary 



Pictures 



CALIFORNIA 
4th and Market 



'Miss Bluebird" 

Bebe Daniels 



CAMEO 

936 Market St. 



'Hurricane Kid" 

Hoot Gibson 



CAPITOL 

64 Ellis St. 



'White Collars" 



BEATTY'S 
CASINO 
Ellis and Mason 



"The Silent 
Accuser" 



CASTRO 



Pictures 



NEW 

COLUMBIA 
Eddy and Mason 



May Itohson in 

"Something Tells 
Me" 



CURRAN 
Geary, Nr. Mason 



San Carlos Grand 
Opera Co. 



GRANADA 
1066 Market St. 



"Top of the World" 



GOLDEN GATEl Vaudeville and 
G. G. Ave. and Taylor) Pictures 



HIPPODROME 



Vaudeville 



IMPERIAL 
1077 Market St. 



Marion Davles 

"Janice Meredith" 



LOEWS 
WARFIELD 
988 Market St. 



"The Wife of the 
"Centaur" 



METROPOLITAN 

2055 Union St. 



'Rin Tin Tin" 



NEW FILLMORE 
NEW MISSION 



'North of 36" 



ORPHEUM 
O'Farrell and Powell 



Vaudeville 



PANTAGES 
Market at Mason 



Vaudeville 
Pictures 



PLAZA 



"Kempy" 



PORTOLA 



Pictures 

I'toK'rain Changed 



ROYAL 

1529 Polk St. 



Pictures 



STRAND 
965 Market St. 



Will Klruj « Co. In 

"Oh, Behave" 



and difficult Mendelssohn Concerto Eoi 
Violin in E Minor. From start to fin 
ish, she showed a precision and knowl- 
edge of her work seldom excelled by 
the greatest and best known artists. 
She has a wonderfully strong tune, 
which was especially effective in the 
Andante, and her arpeggios and caden- 
zas in the Allegro vivace closed her 
part of the program and brought her 
round after round of thunderous ap- 
plause, most certainly deserved. 

The symphony part of the program 
proper opened with Beethoven's best 
known and perhaps best loved sym- 
phony — the Fifth. Mr. Hertz con- 
ducted it as if he were inspired, and 
to hear him read this beautiful work 
one seems carried somewhat nearer the 
Almighty. 

The final number, the Tone Poem, 
"Don Juan" by Richard Strauss 
brought forth everything of technic, 
instrumentation and grouping that the 
orchestra afforded ; it is needless to say 
that our very splendid symphony 
orchestra played it most majestically 
and beautifully. Special mention must 
be made of the wood wind section and 
Walter Hornung our noble French 
horn player. 



Warfield 

The eternal struggle between two dis- 
tinct and rending passions — the one pure- 
ly animal and sensual which subjugates 
all the finer finalities of man ; and the 
other a noble, honorable love which fights 
for supremacy — is the daring subject 
which forms the basic plot of "Wife of 
the Centaur," coming Saturday to 
Loew's Warfield. 

John Gilbert, who plays the difficult 
and unsympathetic role of the centaur, 
gives a performance that should strength- 
en materially the success he gained with 
his work' in Elinor Glyn's "His Hour," 
and in "The Snob." 

As the "centaur's" wife, Eleanor 
Boardman achieves a dramatic quality 
which is most convincing; Aileen I'ringle 
plays the thoughtless, sensuous creature 
who lures Jeffrey to her. but finally loses 
him to the wife. 

In the supporting cast are such well- 
known players as William Haines, Kate 
Lester, l'hilo McCullough, Hetty Fran- 
cisco, Kate Trice. Jacquelin Gadson, Lin- 
coln Stedman anil others. 

The Fanchon and Marco troupe will 
cavort upon the stage in another of their 
tuneful revues, the first Idea to he trans- 
planted here after Marco's eastern tour. 
Short comic reels and the Crossword 
novelty film will also be given. 



Cameo 

Hoot Gibson is heading the screen at- 
tractions at the Cameo this week in his 
newest picture "The Hurricane Kid." 
It is a Western drama with human in- 
(Contlnued "ti Page 16) 



Amusements 



WILKESG™' y l K ° lb ?? d DiU 
Geary and Mason 



merly i 
iry L 
on J 



in 
"Politics" 



WIGWAM 



Pictures 



Concerts 



S. F. Symphony 

Popular Concert, Curran Theatre. Sunday 
Afternoon, February 1. Kllen Edwards and 
Allan lller. Pianists. 

New Columbia 

Sunday Afternoon, February 1. 31aier and 
Pattison Recital on Two Pianos. 



Samuel Shortridge informed us that : 
"One of my favorite stories is that 
of the Frenchwoman who complained 
that she had been grossly insulted by 
an American with whom she was trav- 
eling. On inquiry it appeared that they 
had traveled alone in the same com- 
partment for an hour and that he had 
not once looked at her." 

"If I may give two, I like also the 
story of the suffragist who cried out: 
'The Lord is with us, and with Her on 
our side we cannot fail.' " 



The artist was painting a picture 
of the ruined castle on the hills. He 
was watched with great interest by an 
old countryman, who stood silently by 
him for almost an hour. 

"You are interested in painting?" 
asked the painter, looking up at last. 

"Aye," replied the old man. 

"I am staying in this part for a few 
weeks," went on the artist, resuming 
his work. "I am doing a series of coun- 
try scenes, and I like to get a little 
local color." 

"You're gittin' it, mister — you're 
gettin' it," answered the old man. "I 
jus' painted that bench you're sittin' 
on !" 



fiE^FLOWElg 




* TTte^bice afa Thousand Gardens 

224-226 Giant Ave M Kearny 4975 




HARRY DIXON 

INTERPRETS 

YOUR IDEAS 

IX METAL 



241 GRANT AVE. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 31, 1925 





ocier 





By Antoinette Arnold 



Cupid Busy — Among the Smart Set 

Did you ever hear of so many romances in our smart 
set? What a glorious number of engagements! 

That Cupid fellow, known in polite parlance as the little 
God of Love, has been about the busiest of busy people in 
all the wide world. 

For one thing, he is getting ready for Eastertide; for 
the sacred period of all the year seems to please him con- 
siderably for the crowning event of his fine romantic work 
— the wedding day. 

After all, it is Cupid who really turns the wheels of the 
universe, setting the pace for humanity. Commerce, in- 
dustry, educational advantages, financial achievements are 
each in turn relegated to secondary place when Cupid ap- 
pears on the scene. 

He covers considerable ground in the performance of 
that bow-and-arrow job of his. Sometimes, he sharpens 
his tools in Europe, or New York, or in Washington, D. C, 
in Florida, at the seaside, or high on mountain tops, and 
then subtly lures his happy prey to our western land. 
San Francisco, Burlingame, Oakland, Piedmont, become 
the scenes where this merry little man clinches his bargain 
with love and kisses, teas, dinner-dances and then — the 
"formal announcement.'" 

He is a wonder, that Cupid fellow ! 
"Don't know what to call him — 
But he's mighty like a rose." 



Neville-Wheeler Wedding 

One of the interesting weddings of the past week t'»>k 
place at the home of Mrs. Arnold Calegaris on Jackson 
Street, on the evening of January 23, uniting in wedlock 
Miss Frances Neville, daughter of Major-General Wendell 
C. Neville, U. S. M. C, and Mrs. Neville, and Ensign John 
Pinckney Wheeler Vest, U. S. N. 

Relatives and intimate friends of the bridal couple, num- 
bering about one hundred, were present. Rev. Charles 
Deems, of Trinity Church, officiated at the wedding cere- 
mony, which took place in the drawing room of the Cale- 
garis residence. 

Flowering Japanese quince, an abundance of pink roses 
exquisitely arranged, formed the setting for the wedding 
with green and silver accessories. 

General Neville gave his daughter away. She was attired 
in a frock of white georgette with the slender lines which 
mode dictates, an embroidery of pearl beads being added as 
elegant adornment. Her tulle veil formed a Juliet cap. 
Elegant applique lace, a family heirloom, was draped grace- 
fully on her bridal crown. She carried a shower of lillies 
of the valley, which fell in fringe-like fashion. 

Miss Mary Mattlage was maid of honor, wearing a frock 
of pale green georgette with a wide circular collar. Her 
flowers were sweetheart roses. Mrs. Rene LeRoy and Miss 
Lea Calegaris were the bride's attendants. They both wore 
green georgette charmingly topped with the same kind of 



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wide collars worn by Miss Mattlage. Round bouquets of 
gardenias were carried. 

The best man was Ensign J. J. O'Donnell, U. S. N., and 
the ushers were fellow officers of the bridegroom. They 
were Lieutenant Warren Sessions and Ensigns William 
Mendenhall, William Crofford, C. S. Snodgrass. John 
McCitchen, James Brady, William Sullivan and Robert 
Coffer. The bride observed the old traditional navy wed- 
ding custom of cutting the wedding cake with her husband's 
sword. 

One of the interesting guests was Mrs. Agatha Vest of 
St. Louis society, who came to the Fairmont Hotel where 
she remained for a few days visiting friends in San Fran- 
cisco. 

* * * 

Grant Wedding 

One of the most interesting weddings within the next 
fortnight is that of Miss Edith Grant and Mr. William A. 
Magee, Jr., which promises to be one of the season's most 
beautiful of all marriage ceremonies. The date of the wed- 
ding day is Wednesday, February 11, 

The charming bride-elect has chosen her sister. Miss 
Josephine Grant, to be her maid of honor. The brides- 
maids will be Misses Elizabeth Magee, Leonora Armsby, 
Mary Martin, Marianne and Katherine Kuhn, Alice Mofntt, 
Mary Emma Flood, and Evelyn Poett. 

Mr. Harry Hush Magee will be his brother's best man. 
The ushers at the wedding will be Messrs. James Mofntt, 
Guy C. Earl, Jr., of Los Angeles; Herbert J. Tietzen, Leon 
Brooks Walker, Charles S. Wheeler, Tallant Tubbs, Ken- 
neth Walsh, John O'Neil, George Montgomery, and Walter 
F. R. Hush. 

* * * 

Miss Edith Grant is being entertained at smart affairs by 
society ; a number of these events to take place almost up 
to the time of the important wedding day. Mrs. W. W. 
Crocker gave a lovely luncheon at her country place back of 
San Mateo in compliment to friends of Miss Grant. 



The engagement has been announced of Miss Helen 
Deamer, the daughter of Mrs. William Deamer of San 
Francisco, to Lieutenant Charles Rend, U. S. N„ the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Rend of Chicago. 

The first news of the betrothal came at a tea given by 
Miss Lily and Miss Mary Callahan and Mrs. Helen Lem- 
man at their home on Pacific avenue recently, when three 
hundred guests called to greet Miss Deamer and her mother 
on their return from a year and a half abroad. The bride- 
elect is a graduate of the University of California and she 
has one brother, William Deamer, Jr., who is there now as 
a student in the medical school. 



An important and brilliant affair in New York, recently, 
was the dance given by Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Astor at their 
Fifth Avenue home for two of the season's debutantes. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 

401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutler 0130 Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



January, 31, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Miss tiara Dinsmore and Miss Margaret 
Dows. Tlie famous Gold Ballroom in the 
Astor mansion that has been opened only for 
lectures and charity entertainments in the re- 
cent past shone with its old-time glory, and 
about 200 guests, most of them of the younger 
set- in society, were entertained. Supper was 
served at small tables in other rooms on the 
same floor. * * * 

Charity and Fashion Unite — Splendid 
Sum Raised 

Over .$40,000 was raised as the result of the 
Golden Mardi Gras ball given at the Civic Au- 
ditorium for the benefit of the Maternity Ward 
of the Children's Hospital. Sale of tickets for 
the ball exceeded all previous records. Ex- 
penses were comparatively small, and accord- 
ing to Mrs. Henry Foster Dutton's report, 
the handsome sum will be used for the new 
building annex at once. 

* * * 

Now, the gowns were something to re- 
member ! 

Mrs. Phillips Dunn, the queen, was beauti- 
ful, positively beautiful in her robe of cloth of gold em- 
broidered with rhinestones. A long court train fell from 
her shoulders and the sleeves of graceful length were of 
chiffon, one of flaming color and the other of silver tissue 
— both forming part of the train effect. A huge headdress 
worn over her dark hair added to the luster of her dark 
eyes. Her staff was made of rhinestones. 

Miss Constance White, the business men's choice for 
queen and Mrs. Dunn's closest competitor, appeared as 
silver moon, her gown being of iridiscent silver cloth 
trimmed with rhinestones. She also looked lovely. 

Groups representing California's fruits and flowers were 
the queen's court attendants. Clusters of grapes, the 
orange shades, the wheat, golden and glittering — every 
conceivable shade of gold was present and used to pro- 
nounce the name of the state. 

Silk wigs were everywhere. They bobbed here, there 
and in variant shades of the rainbow. 

The Golden Ball was a gala event — and it was superla- 
tively high in tone, standard and intention — a credit to 
everyone concerned. The ball was typically western in 
hospitality and supremely San Franciscan in generosity. 

The meeting of Charity and Fashion at the- Gold Ball 
given last Saturday night at the San Francisco Civic Audi- 
torium should declare in convincing terms the "milk of 
human kindness," wdiich after all, is what makes the grand 
old world go 'round. 

Society in its most brilliant array gathered to play, 'tis 
true ; but, it assembled too, to pay its highest homage to 
the little tots in the Children's Hospital. For it was. that 
a new wing could be built on the Maternity division of the 
hospital that the beautiful affair was so generously given. 

The ball was truly a dream sight; a dream place; and the 
culmination of dreams cherished by noble women on the 
executive boards of the hospital and its humanitarian work 




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the grapes crowding the hillsides in autumn, 
the dusky shades of the night and the silver 
of the moon, which lighted the flame of joy 
sweeping over the crowds as they danced the 
hours away in the Municipal Auditorium, 
which was masquerading as the realm of the 
sun worshipers where the great goddess Ka 
sat on the throne. 

It was the sweet remembrance of charity 
which spurred on the queen of the Mardi Gras 
and the ladies of her court to exert every effort 
toward making the pageant a spectacle which 
San Francisco will long remember. Tire- 
lessly they worked, girls of wealth and leisure, 
matrons with social duties piling up in an 
alarming fashion, and business men who for- 
got financial transactions long enough to make 
it possible for San Francisco's little folks to 
have the medical care needed at the Children's 
Hospital throughout the coming year. 
* * * 

Pen Women Assemble For Literary Concourse 

The San Francisco Branch League of Ameri- 
can Pen Women gave a literary tea to mem- 
bers and visiting celebrities in the Terrace room of the Fair- 
mont Hotel, Saturday, January 25, with an international 
theme the basis for the distinctive event. 

Man}' well known California writers were among the hon- 
ored guests, who sat about tables beautifully decorated in 
honor of the occasion. Mrs. George McGowan, who presided 
over the main round table placed in the center of the room, 
entertained famous authors and representatives from the visit- 
ing Navy and Army circles. Her table was a colorful and 
dainty arrangements of French color combinations. In the 
center was a huge nosegay of pink and blue flowers with 
lovers' knots extending across the cloth to nosegay favors for 
her guests. Miss Virginia Sullivan, charmingly gowned, as- 
sisted Mrs. McGowan in welcoming her distinguished 
guests. 

Mrs. Frederick Colburn, president of the Branch, presided 
at the speakers' table, which was fashioned in Mexican treas- 
ures and brilliant colorings. Annie Laurie, Mrs. Jack London 
and Mrs. Maul of New York City were among her guests. 
Mrs. Josephine Wilson, California State Vice-president of the 
League of American Pen Women presided at a long table 
with the owd emblem of the League the central adornment. 
Miss Man Bird Clayes, president of the Berkeley Branch and 
Miss Sibyl Hayes, president of the Santa Clara County Branch, 
were distinguished guests seated with Mrs. Wilson. Eleanor 
Ross, editor of the News Letter was an honor guest at the 
same table and seated next to her were Anna Blake Mezquida, 
well known writer, Winifred McGee, composer, Mrs. Henry 
B. Lister, writer and composer, and presidents of other clubs. 
Mrs. A. W. Scott was chairman of the day and introduced 
the talent of the program. 

Many other delightful groups made the Pen Women's 
gathering memorable and interesting. A talk on colors was 
given by Rudolph Schaeffer. "Over the tea cups" was the 
topic of a talk by representatives from China and Japan, 



Quoting from the great Book of Books, "Faith, Hope with an illuminating address on chocolate by ^he_president. 
and Charity, the greatest of these is Charity." 
A contemporarj on the Chronicle said: . 

Charity Lights Flame 

"It was Charity garbed in blazing yellows, the warm 
tones of gold, the Miles of every sort of sky. the purples of 



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at your Home or Office. 



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West Indies 

ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET COMPANY 

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TELEPHONE 4>9-423 Mostgome«v Street 

SUTTER 6874 lkn California 

.Memorial Engrossing a specially 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 31, 1925 




Ira Coburn, past pote of the Shrine, lias accepted a 
challenge from Hugh King McKevitt. the handsome bar- 
rister, to play 18 holes of golf in the snow at Yosemite 
on Saturday. 



By Hoot McGregor 

"Roll-um-up Pete" will try and do the course in nothing. 



"Doggy" Doc Kron will bark his way around. 



Hugh McKevitt reports in good shape after taking a 
course of instructions from his manager, Jack Houstan. 



Bill Crocker will give the ladies a treat when he ap- 
pears in his latest Paris creation. 



Jack Wisher, the nimble secretary, will referee the 
match. 



Ernie West and Frank Nestroy will meet again for the 
championship of the tailor's union. 



Rod Cuvette has had his war clubs insured. 



Herb Billsbrough says he can shoot the course in 585. 



Harold Ballantiue claims he made the round the same 
day. 



Jack McCilvrey, the champion of the stone cutters, will 
take his first vacation in fifteen vears. 



George Levthurby says the way to make a good score 
is to have music with your golf. 



Louis Ghirardelli will pack his chocolate coated caddie 
along. 



Rudie Habernicht, the glass man, hopes to cut himself 
around the course. 



Dr. Herman Wilson is a 10-1 favorite for the grand- 
father's cup. 



Bob Thompson will use six-wheel breaks if necessary. 



Jack Hazlett and Jim Symon the two giant golfers of the 
Shrine will play for the heavyweight title. 



Pete Gerhardt. the trimmer, will give the course the 
once over. 



Jack "Stringbean" Fllerv will introduce a lot of new 
shots he learned whils't hunting ducks. 



Albert Samuels has offered a lucky wedding ring as a 
trophy. 



Charlie Howard has been missed from the links since 
his return from Europe, but hopes to play in the coming 
event. 



Frank Foran has donated a truck of "Old King Cole." 



Lee Dolson, the famous minstrel, will sing his way 
around. 



Captain James Madison has spruced up his game during 
his trip around the world. 



Hugo Newhouse, the barrister, will give free advice. 



Whit Prentice will roll his own on the porch. 



Charlie Goodwin, champion of the grandfather's club, 
will defend his title against all comers. 



Al Sala. the Mission Street baron, makes his best drives 
in a Marmon. 



Johnny Crowe will distribute a flock of vacuum cups. 



"Dinty" Moore, the ex-gob, hopes they hold the tourney 
in San Rafael. "It's such a restful place." 



John De Back has promised not to throw awav any more 
clubs. 



Hugo Ramacciotti, the Adonis from the Presidio Club, 
will drop everything to attend. 



Joe Goldie plays golf to perfection. 



"Fossy" Brayton the singing stock broker ha- forsaken 
handball to play golf. 



Jim Doherty, the peer of Realtors will make his debut 
as a golfer. 



All legal disputes will be settled by Hugh McKevitt 



Bill Woodfield will demonstrate a few shots he learn't 
whils't in Havana. 



Eddie Rolfs will play in his first tournament. 



Frank Klimm of the Board of Health says its a cinch 
for him to go round in par. 



iin account of sickness, Frank Foran was only able t< 
play six days last week. 



Walter Hood, the certified accountant, will check up on 
all the scores. 



"Pop" Eisert will attempt to lower the colors of Billy 
Gilmour, the Scotch spendthrift. 



The Bernard threesome Ed, Al, and Howard will at- 
tempt to dethrone the Newhouse triplets. Art. Hugo and 
Bill. 



Bill Woodfield will be there with his little red necktie. 



Dr. Floyd Russell announces that its only 39 davs to 
the Saint Patrick's Day Tournament. 



January. 31, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 




By Edwin 

Swimming. The Pacific Coast is going to have the pleas- 
ure of seeing' four of America's representatives at the Olym- 
pic Games, in action. The Purple swimmers will be ac- 
companied on their Western Jaunt by the Glee Club of their 
University. In other words, while the Famous Four act 
like ducks, the Famous Fifty will act like birds. They will 
visit along the line of travel, stopping off at Omaha, Los 
Angeles. San Francisco, and Portland, Oregon. From Ore- 
gon they'll wind homeward, giving exhibitions, however, 
all along. 

From July 30th to August 1st, the National Outdoor 
Swimming Championships will be held at Seattle. This 
will be the biggest aquatic event of the year. 



Horse Racing. The Racing season, now at its height in 
Tia Juana, Mexico, has been enlivened even more than usual 
this vear by the lifting of gambling restrictions in Mexico 
that were enacted during the Obregon regime. There have 
been many excellent cards of races, and the betting has 
been very fast and furious. The class of animals this 
season is also much better, as many of the Eastern stock 
owners have become interested in the events and have en- 
tered their lines. Heretofore many mediocre races have 
been held, just the "ham and eggers" of the game, present- 
ing their last chances. Thus the old stagers are supplanted 
by the influx of new blood. 

When next you visit the Southern portion of our state, 
drop across the line to Tia Juana. You can do a little 
betting and even maybe perhaps a little drinking; that is. 
I am told they serve marvelous ice-cream sodies in Old 
Town. Here's hoping that you make expenses at the track. 



Track. Olympic Swimmers are not the only ones who 
can tour. Loren Murchison of Newark, N. J., and Charlie 
Paddock of California. Los Angeles district, both of Paris 
Fame, are starting a little trip. In fact, just to show the 
Public one can run farther than one can swim, they're going 
all around the world. Appearances in action will be made 
in almost all the large cities of any importance, wherever 
there is a following of Track and Field Lovers. 



Baseball. Amongst the happening'- of importance to the 
ball mil bat fraternity during the week was the placing of 
the Vernon Club team on the open market. 

Eddie Maier, the Club's present owner, has offered it for 
sale, and apparently for no reason. So if you'd like a little 
Ball team "in your home" and you'd like to part with $200,- 
01 id. (merely a week's pay, you see) why here's your chance! 

Mr. Maier also adds that he's not particular who buys 
from him; von or 1. or even Walter Johnson can haw it. 
Hut as for Yours Truly. I hardly know what I'd use for 
money, since beer .--lugs are extinct. 



F. Marriott 

Bowling. The Prize team of the San Francisco Howling 
Association meets the Southern California Bowling Associa- 
tion Champs, on March the 1st the winners to meet here in 
May. The Pacific Coast Bowling Association Congress has 
their tenpin meet in San Francisco at that time, composed 
of the various Sectional winners. 



Boxing. Women, God love them, for the last decade, 
have taken their places outside of the home in the Realm of 
Sport. You find them in all lines of endeavor, golfers, 
tennis devotees, anglers, fencers and even polo playing. 
However, it has just been within the last year that they 
have shown any interest (again I say outside of the home) 
in the Puglistic art. They tell me that at no less a college 
than Vassar, there is now a Boxing Team. Beware ! you 
would-be flirts. 

Since the new state Boxing law has gone in effect, Los 
Angeles has had quite an influx of Champions. Amongst 
the bouts concerning the Champs, but not in the least en- 
dangering of their crowns, will be the Welterweight go, 
featuring Mickey Walker against Bert Colima, the Pacific- 
Coast Champ. Then there will be in the featherweight 
class "Kid" Kaplan with "just an opponent." Eddie "Cannon- 
ball" Martin, the Bantam King, will pummel someone of not 
much importance. 

From Missouri state we hear that they like our new 
California boxing law. So much so in fact that when ap- 
proached. Governor Samuel Baker stated that he would not 
oppose it. "You got to show me." Missourians' famous 
saying, is evidently not in the deal, so they must he con- 
vinced. 

Many rumors have it that Jack Dempsey is love-sick, 
even to the extent of retiring from the ring. Marriage 
seems to be near at hand. But why shouldn't he? He 
made himself the best in his line, he lived like a man should, 
saved and invested carefully and is now sitting pretty. 
And with little Estelle Taylor, the movie queen, famous 
in her own right, they should have a world of happiness and 
some more "world beaters." 

The News Letter is inclined to side with the new Boxing 
Commission on the granting of permits and licenses. While 
our sympathies are always with the American Legion, it 
is only occasionally that they are in a position to stage 
exhibitions, for the general public expects bouts to be 
properly handled. 

To this end it takes good management ami a good match- 
maker. In most instances it is only to be found in old 
established circles. Certainly we believe that former pro- 
moters with money invested, should be given first pref- 
erence. 

Then again, other permits should not be granted in close 
proximity to promoters holding licenses 



Basketball. The Professional Basketball Teams have been 

in hot competition this season. Amongst the various tirms 
and organizations that have put teams in the field, the 
outstanding team seems to be that of Kber and Sheehan. 
Thc\ lead the league so far by 1,000. Second to them are 
the Oaklanders, with 500, and the next is Adam et Eve 
Parfum (almost like quoting Scripture). The games to 
date have been very thrilling and fast, played before very 
large audiences. 



A good story is told of an hostler who was sent to the 
stable to bring forth a traveler's horse. Not knowing which 
of the two strange horses in the stalls belonged to the 
traveler, and wishing to avoid the appearance of ignorance 
in his business, he saddled both animals and brought them 
to the door. The traveler pointed out his own horse, say- 
ing. "That's my nag." "Certainly, yer honor," was the 
reply; "I knew very well, but I didn't know which was the 
other gentleman's." 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 31, 1925 



Bits of Unwritten History 



By Edward S. Spring 



CHAPTER XXI 
A Remarkably Strong Syndicate 

IN the early '90's, a syndicate, composed of very prom- 
inent and wealthy local men, was formed to acquire one 
of the most famous mining- properties in Utah. The mem- 
bers included ex-governor George C. Perkins, W. W. Stow, 
A. N. Towne, Jerome Fillmore, Stephen Gage, Alex. Badlam, 
Isaac Trumbo, Cornelius O'Connor and Charles H. Fish. 
These, together with Bishop Hiram Clawson of the Mor- 
mon Church in Salt Lake City, and a few others in Utah, 
made a remarkably strong aggregation and, it will be 
noticed that the railroad interests were largely represented, 
as well as politics, banking, shipping and insurance. All 
of the people named, have since passed on. 

This syndicate had taken a working bond on the proper- 
ties of the Bullion-Beck and Champion Mining Company 
of Tintic district, Utah. The mine had been a big pro- 
ducer of silver, lead and zinc ores, in the early days and had 
paid its owners well, but, afterwards, it had long and ex- 
pensive litigation and was closed down. At the time 
written of, the control was in the hands of people high in 
the counsels of the Mormon Church. The San Francisco 
syndicate had an option to buy the property for $75,000. 
This option expired in a few months. The work, thus far 
done, on syndicate account, had yielded very little good 
ore. The main shaft was only 500 feet deep and it was im- 
possible to sink any deeper, with the old hoisting plant. 
With the mine well cleaned of ore, down to that depth, 
and no new bodies in sight, the syndicate members, who 
had already spent quite a sum on the property, felt like 
abandoning the undertaking. The superintendent of the 
mine, at that time, was W. H. ("Hank") Smith, a former 
well-known Comstock mining man. His reports to the 
syndicate were few and unsatisfactory. Orders were sent 
him to virtually close down the property. 

The syndicate held a meeting, at which, it was decided 
to obtain an independent report on the condition and pros- 
pects of the Bullion-Beck and Champion pioperty, before 
final abandonment. The present writer was chosen to 
make this report and he accepted the offer. He will there- 
fore use the first person in writing the remainder of this 
story. 

My instructions were to make my investigations as quietly 
as possible. I was to impress Superintendent Smith, (whom 
I knew well), with the belief that I was visiting Tintic dis- 
trict, solely as a newspaper man, gathering information for 
a general "write-up" of that part of the mining field. This, 
I succeeded in doing after a four-days' examination of 
the Bullion-Beck and neighboring mines, and a study of 
the geological characteristics. 

* * * 

Mormon Church Kept Records 
I spent a day in Salt Lake City, going o,er the old re- 
ports of the mine, which were kept at the "Lion House," 
(head office then of the Mormon Church), and then re- 
turned to San Francisco, where I wrote and submitted un- 
report to the syndicate. The main findings of this report 
were : 

Formation — A great belt of magnesian limestone, with 
the bedded planes, in Bullion-Beck ground, uptilted at 
a sharp angle, which insured fractures in which ore bodies 
might be found at much greater depth than the 500 feet 
already reached. Other mines in the vicinity, working in 
the same formation, and under similar conditions, were 
finding large deposits of good ore at and below the 1,000- 
foot level. 



Resources — No good ore in sight, but 10.000 tons of sec- 
ond and third-class ore in place, and on the dump; which 
could be profitably worked, when facilities were secured. 

Recommendations — Install a new hoisting plant at the 
main shaft capable of sinking to the 2,500 foot level and 
open and explore the ground every 100 feet as the shaft 
went down. 

I was so impressed with the formation, the history and 
the indications in the Bullion-Beck, that I personally urged 
all the syndicate members I met, not to let such a promising 
property slip out of their hands, but to secure a new hoist 
plant and to exercise their option to buy the mine for 
$75,000. To these appeals, the syndicate, through their 
secretary, Alex. Badlam, made me a counter-proposition. 
This was, that they would sell me their option tor $100,000, 
which would net them $25,000 above the purchase price of 
$75,000, and reimburse them for part of their expenditures, 
provided that this offer was approved by W. W. Stow, 
their chief adviser. 

It so happened that Col. W. J. Sutherland, representative 
of the Doris syndicate of London, controlling the Candelaria 
Water Works and Milling Company, Limited, was in San 
Francisco at that time, about to close a deal for the pur- 
chase of the Holmes Mining Company of Candelaria from 
Alvinza Hayward and W. S. Hobart, the chief owners. 
I owned considerable ground adjoining the Holmes, and 
knew Col. Sutherland well. I tried to interest him in the 
Bullion-Beck proposition. But he had gone too far with 
the Holmes deal and, in fact, had closed the purchase of that 
property, for $750,000. Otherwise, he would have readily 
gone in with me on the Bullion-Beck purchase. He ad- 
vised me, however, to see Stow and take the option to 
buy for $100,000 and go to London, where he would help 
me find a buyer for a bigger price. 

My interview with W. W. Stow, was unsatisfactory. 
He frowned on the proposition to sell me the Bullion-Beck 
for $100,000 and said that if anything was to be done with 
the mine in London, it should be through hamilton Smith, 
a great American expert, who was there and he intended 
to write to him. All this time, I did not know that Stow 
was the originator of the proposition to sell me the Bullion- 
Beck for $100,000 and, in fact, had instructed Badlam to 
make me the offer. This was the case. But my report had 
been given by them to Louis Janin, of the noted Janin fam- 
ily of mining engineers and, being asked for his advice he 
replied : 

"My judgment is that the young man is correct. This 
promises to be an extremely valuable property. I would 
urge you to follow his recommendations. Get a new hoist 
plant and sink. Take up the option and g«t the property 
for $75,000. It's cheap at that price." 

Influenced by Louis Janin, endorsed by W. W. Stow, 
the syndicate contributed the capital that put in a new hoist- 
ing plant and took over the control of the Bullion-Beck. 
After sinking the shaft a short distance, several large cham- 
bers of rich ore were encountered and further development 
work led to even greater discoveries that resulted in a 
production of over $6,000,000, with a high percentage of 
dividends. It should be mentioned that the San Francisco 
syndicate paid me handsomely for my services. 

(To be continued) 



"Does your grocer give you honest weight?" asked Mrs. 
Boggs. 

"Oh, yes," replied Mrs. Biggs, "after ordering a three- 
pound sack of potatoes yesterday I watched him weigh it 
and when I told him it wasn't quite three pounds he went 
right out in the store-room and got a heavier sack." 



A woman is never satisfied. If she can't capture a new 
man she starts to make over the one she has. 



January, 31, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 




[be careful to not burn down the houses 
in cooking our pie. 



By Antisthenes 

The Lesson of That Murder ; fact of there being but one set of gov- 

It may not be learned, but the flood erning officials as an ultimate object to 
of juvenile murderings filling the land ; be attained to effect a big saving in the 
and culminating in the matricide of j, taxpayers' bill. The politicians will 
Dorothy Ellingson bears a lesson, j strive manfully and otherwise against 
Decry as you will the mandatory in ^this encroachment on their sacred and 
unbringing, the eclectic system by p time-honored preserves but we must 
which the child may pick according 
to his sense of "honor" what course 
he shall pursue seems proven perni- 
cious. Then we have laid away in the 
dusty attics of so-called old-fashion, 
with modesty of apparel, downcast 
eyes, belief in God and sex barriers in 
institutions of learning, the punitive 
rod and have correspondingly multi- 
plied electric chairs, scaffolds and 
prison cells. 

Misguided — or more probably per- 
verted minded — persons whose sense 
of justice is dwarfed or lost are suf- 
fered to go among us with leaky eyes 
and stulted intelligence preaching love 
and pardon for poisoner, child defiler 
and woman raper; a minister of God, 
Mr. Gordon, is quoted as saying of 
this slayer of the mother who brought 
her forth in travail : "Let me frankly 
say and simply I sympathize pro- 
foundly with this child of crime." 

The movie and the newspapers de- 
pict the sordid and criminal in all 
their revolting detail and set these be- 
fore the eyes of prying youth. All for 
money, money these commercialize 
and flaunt sin. So when these "busi- 
men" and "annointeds of God" so abet 
crime, what wonder the morally dis- 
eased take permit to imitate what these 
apparently sanction? 

* * * 
A Greater San Francisco — But How? 

We are on the eve of accomplishing 
something we should have done twen- 
ty years ago: the consolidation of San 
Francisco and San Mateo counties. A 
definite program of procedure was 
adopted last week at a meeting in San 
Mateo of the ways and means commit- 
tee of the proponents. As we pre- 
viously mentioned in this column this 
splendid achievement must be accom- 
plished not only for the glory attend- 
ant on the unity but for practical pur- 
poses redounding in benefits to both 
communities. Above all the political 
issue must be suspiciously watched. If 
we are to but obliterate county lines, 
be all a-flutter as citizens of a populous 
metropolis and rejoice in the euphoni- 
ous appelation of "San Matranciscans" 
the mo\ ement will be abortive. 

In its incipiency we must stress the 



maintain a single eye for efficiency. 
Civil service must be thoroughly ap- 
plied to the scheme as otherwise we 
'sense the opportunity likely to obtain 
'for a thousand and one petty intracity 
sapping sinecures likely to entail. In 

tthe glory and excitement incident to 
the chase after consolidation we must 
, 1 
t\ 

i* General Pershing has left for Peru to 
■ represent the United States at the 
Peruvian Centennial of the Battle of 
Ayacucho. A few thousands of us 
are little concerned about Ayacucho 
and what it signified, but, in view of 
revelations presently unfolding in the 
Scott divorce trial in Michigan, touch- 
ing a recent wild unvolsteaded Con- 
gressional trip to Panama at govern- 
ment expense, a few million of tax- 
payers have become acutely interested 
in these picnic junketings for which they 
pay and are wondering if our nation 
shall ever revert to the simple ways 
of a democracy. 

* * * 

But the Amateurs Are Wealthy 

One day, while strolling through the 
park, a Shakespearean actor of the old 
school (i. e., long hair, tie, coat, and 
feet) chanced upon one of the dregs 
which frequent the public benches. 

"And who may you be?" quoth our 
hero in a voice that would make Mac- 
beth sound like a piccolo. 

"I was a bootlegger, kind sir," an- 
swered the victim of modern civiliza- 
tion. 

" 'A bootlegger,' and I am an actor. 
Two professions, ruined by amateurs." 
— Widow. 




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14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 31, 1925 



BOHEMIA AT BIGIN'S 
By Eleanor F. Ross 



WHERE TO DINE 



the 
for 



(Note: The News Letter each week will endeavor to describe 
entertainments, the specialties, plat iln jonr and those little dishe: 
which the many prominent restaurants of San Francisco are famous.) 

If you have ever partaken of Mrs. Emerson's "Consulate 
teas and dinners", at her studio, 573 Sutter street, then you 
will have an idea of what is in store for you at Bigin's. for 
Mrs. Emerson has recently become a partner in that fa- 
mous restaurant in Columbus Avenue, and intends to carry 
out some very unique and interesting programs. In the 
first place, there will be for your delectation, a series of 
national types of dinners and luncheons, — which will in- 
clude not only European cookery, but will feature the Ori- 
ental as well ; this in addition to Bigin's usual splendid 
cuisine. These national dinners will be illuminated by 
travel information on the country that is being represented 
in the cuisine, and illustrated by moving pictures, and 
dances typical of the nation in question. There will be an 
Oriental nook furnished appropriately, in the balcony at 
the end of the cafe, and here Turkish coffee will be served. 
(Ah! do you remember that syrupy, delicious Turkish 
coffee which we tasted at the Exposition?) Then to finish 
off the entertainment end of it, every Saturday afternoon 
Mrs. Emerson will give what she calls "Junior Satur- 
days," from three to five o'clock, when the young people 
of the city can foregather and dance and drink Russian 
tea from a real Russian samovar. 

And lastly, there is Giacomi de Lucca! Have you heard 
Giacomi de Lucca? The young Italian who was called 
"the Caruso of the Navy", when he was in Uncle Sam's 
ships of the sea? Then you must hear him, if you love a 
wonderful voice as much as we do ! We predict that this 
young man will some day, not in the too distant future, 
be lifting his colorful voice on the operatic stage, and then, 
then — you will listen to him entranced, and you will say : 
"Where, where did I hear those tones before? Somewhere 
in San Francisco, I am sure — somewhere amongst the 
lights and music of 'little Italy' — Oh yes, I have it now: 
I heard that voice at Bigin's!" 

* * * 

Tom — "Dick and I got in a fight last night and he started 
running." 

Harry — "Well, how did he hit you, then ?" 
"I stumbled." — Yale Record. 

Women's Building Sandwich Shop 

212 Ellis 
Breakfasts 35c-50c Lunch 50c Table d'hote Dinner 60c j 

A la carte orders at all times 




The 

LIDO CAFE 

915 Columbus Avenue 

LADIES SOUVENIR NIGHT 

Dancing, Serpentine Serenade, Concerto impromptu. 
Prizes given to lucky couples 

Italian Dinners DeLuxe 

SI. 50 

No cover charge 



CAFE MARQUARD 




o Adjoining Wilkes and Curran 

Theaters, Geary and Mason. 
Phone Prospect 61 

1925 REVUE 

Sparkling Entertainment 
DINING— DANCING 

After-Theater Suppers 
Superb Service 



Barbecue 
Chill Con Cnrne 
Coffee 


-o- / -S 


^* ^ 




Enohiladnx 

Tnmnle.s 

Broiled Steak* 






■ : '?Wt 


35 -si 


$p| 








Re 


dB 


ULL P 


IT 




72 EDDY STREET, 


San Francisco 


JOE V. 


. ANDERSON, Prop. 




Telephone Douglas 6198 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

THE MOST POPULAR RESTAURANT IN SAN FRANCISCO 
65 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4536 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners, $1.25. Meals Served a la Carte. 

Also Regular French and Italian Dinners. 

Flab, and Game a Specialty 



BLANCO'S 



O'Farrell and Larkln Streets 



240 Columbus Avenue 




'AiSX 



334 Sutter St. 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

li:t Third Avenue, SAN MATEO 



Featuring? Southern Cooking 
Open From 
11:30 a. m. to 2:00 p. m. 
5:30 p. m. to 8:30 p. m. 
Sundays and Holidays 
4:30 to 8:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 

II:tlf Block from HlgrhwnT 



rhonc Franklin 



No visitor should leave the city without dining 

in the finest cafe In America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) - ... - 75 c 

Dinner, Week Darn ......_ (1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and HolldayM - (1.75 



The only real artistic place in the Latin Quarter. Bohemian 

dinner, 75c — served every evening. Saturday, Sunday and 

Holidays, $1.25. Dancing from 7 to 1 every evening. 

BEGIN'S BOLOGNA RESTAURANT 



Phone Sutter 8825 



Louis Cerles. .Tean Barrere, John Piegth, Props. 

NEW SHARON GRILL 

Formerly Bergez-Frank's Old Poodle Dog, Bush Street 

35 NEW MONTGOMERY STREET 

Opposite Palace Hotel Phone Sutter 8608 



Mary Hereth Caroline Jones 

Luncheon is served from 11 :30 to 2:30 
and tea from 3 to 5 



Douglas 7118 



January, 31, l () -'5 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



PLEASURE'S WAND 
inttnued From Pagi 
terest intertwined with the action and has some of the fun- 
niest situations of any of the Gibson pictures. 

Hoot, as usual, appears as a cowboy, lie wanders around 

from place to place dreaming of adventure, lie is romantic. 
but very bashful and this forms the basis for some of the 
biggest laughs. 

Fast action and daring horsemanship are among the 
feature of the picture. Pal. Gibson's horse, takes a prom- 
inent part in this film and participates in some of the 
thrilling situations. 

In addition to the feature there is a good comedy, a new 
International News and other screen attractions. 

The musical numbers are interesting as presented by 
Walter Allen and the Cameo Melodists. Miss Gladys W. 
Salisbury, organist, also takes part in the concerts. 



Golden Gate 

For the coming week the Golden Gate Theater will present 
the talented little oriental screen star, Anna Mae Wong, and 
Hope Hampton and Harrison Ford in the photoplay produc- 
tion "The Price of a Party," at the head of a variety bill of 
vaudeville and screen features. Picture fans will not want to 
miss the personal appearance of Miss Wong, whose work as 
the slave girl in Douglas Fairbanks' "The Thief of Bagdad" 
caused so much favorable comment. The photoplay feature, 
which is from the Cosmopolitan Magazine story, by William 
McHarg, includes in an all star supporting cast, Mary Astor, 
Arthur Edmund Carew and Dagmar Godowsky. 

A comedy act of unusual merit entitled "Like Father, Like 
Son" will be presented by the Four Camerons. Riotous 
comedy, tumbling, singing, dancing and bicycle riding are all 
combined in 20 minutes of fast entertainment. 

"Three's a Crowd" is the title of an interesting comedy skit 
written by Elaine Sterne which will be presented by Jean 
Adair and her company of selected vaudevillians. The piece is 
said to be a common experience from life and to hold some 
bright original comedy. 

Fancy bareback riding by the charming circus star, Lillian 
St. Leone, and a comedy exhibition of the training of circus 
riders combine in an interesting routine to be offered by Bos- 
tock's Riding School. Five beautiful horses appear in the act. 

Charles Sargent and John Marvin are well known phono- 
graph record stars who will sing, and play popular song num- 
bers on many different instruments. 

Don Valerio and his company of slack wire dancers will be 
seen in a skilled wire exhibition. 

Claude Sweeten 's Golden Gate Orchestra will play and the 
usual short films will be shown. 



Beatty's Casino 

A most entertaining screen feature at this steadily increasing 
popular theater will be "The Silent Accuser". It is a "clog" 
picture of a different sort and features Peter the Great, a giant 
German police dog. It has local interest clue to the fact that 
il was written by Jack Boyle, a San Francisco police reporter. 

Bert Leigh anil Co. head the vaudeville bill in a sketch 
called "Five Minutes From the Station". The Petet Troupe 
of foot juggling marvels arc also on the bill; the balance of 
the bill is made up by Iuinn & Caverly, in "Done in ( )il" ; 
Jessie Miller, accomplished cornelist. Earl Fabcr and Margie 
in "Happenings". There is also a comedy ami news weekly 
on the screen and a concert under the direction of Rudolph 
YVolmuth and his orchestra. 



Wilkes 

Kolb and Hill and that riot of fun "Politics" open the third 
week of their engagement here.— and judging from the crowds 
around the box office, arc playing to capacity audiences. 



New Columbia 

"Something Tells .Me" in which May Robson is starring at 
the Columbia, is radically different from anything I have ever 
seen this delightful comedienne in. It abounds in surprising 
situations and climaxes — to tell the truth I can't quite make 
up my mind whether I like it or not, 

However, aside from the play itself, it is a delight to again 
have the pleasure of seeing Miss Robson, and she has sur- 
rounded herself with a mighty fine company of players. 

In addition to being a very good actor, Robert Dilts, as Tom 
Day, sings very delightfully. 

Others whose work stood out prominently were Lillian 
Marnier as Mrs. Sleator ; Lillian Taiz as Laura Barker; Don 
Harrington as Augustus Davenport; Sue Sterling as Sarah 
Barker ; Walter Ayers as Doctor John Lockwood. 



To Kalon Club 

The Terrace Room at the Fairmont was well crowded Tues- 
day when the dramatic section presented a very well balanced 
program, which included three short plays, songs, and a dra- 
matic reading. 

The plays were under the direction of Frederick Smith, 
and did him much credit, especially in view of the fact that 
some of his players until a few months ago, had never done 
any sort of dramatic work. 



Noted Marine Artist Triumphs Again 

Charles H. Grant has scored another notable success in 
his painting of the Japanese flagship "Asama", which was 
presented by the city of San Francisco last Tuesday eve- 
ning at a banquet given by the Chamber of Commerce in 
the court of the Palace Hotel, to the Japanese Admiral, 
Saburo Hyakutake. This painting, which was created along 
the lines of the picture of the British flagship, painted and 
presented by Mr. Grant to the British Admiral last July, 
when the English fleet was anchored in the bay, shows all 
of his wonderful genius as a marine artist, and' adds to his 
laurels as one of America's greatest painters of water- 
scapes. Charles Grant is listed in "Who's Who in 
America," which is a commentary that needs no afterword. 



Australian states are opening millions of acres to settlers. 
Victoria proposes to throw open 1,250.000 acres of north- 
western land. At the same time railway extensions in progress 
in the state will make provision for 500 other farms. Queens- 
land will open up 1,000,000 acres of crown land and construct 
the Dawson River irrigation works which will be one of the 
largest in the world. 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

RIVETED STEEL, PIPE. TANKS, CULVERTS, FLUMES, 

PENSTOCKS, GASHOLDERS. SMOKE STACKS. ETC. 

Snn Frnnclnco, Calif. Los Angeles, Calif. 

•H4 Market St. 5717 Santa Fe Avenue 



Capitol 

"White Collars", that great play of the middle class, goes 
into the sixth week of its run, and reports a tine business. 

There is a splendid cast, and the lines of the play are bright 
and sparkling, and everyone ought to go and see it. 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel— 771 to 777 Valencia Street. Bet. 18th and 19th Sts., 

San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 31, 1925 






By Edward H. Manning 

TO know what the financial crowd is thinking of prospects 
for 1925, one has only to turn to the membership list of the 
San Francisco Stock & Bond Exchange. Scarcely a week passes 
without an addition. The latest is a new Associate Member, 
tie Frei lery & Company, located at 341 Montgomery Street. 
Though a new investment house, the name has been to the 
front for three-quarters of a century in financial circles, hav- 
ing been established in San Francisco in 1849. The new mem- 
bers of the firm. Mr. Combs, Mr. Davis and Mr. Hutchinson, 
have been active for some years in the bond and trading de- 
partments of the Bank of Italy and the Anglo California 
Trust Company in San Francisco and Los Angeles. 

* * * 

— The improvement in industrial conditions is being reflecte 1 
earlier than might have been hoped for, in the returns of re ail 
stores in California cities. The American Bank letter of 
January gives pertinent figures on this point, as regards San 
Francisco, Los Angeles, and Oakland. Why the writer tells 
us that "no unhappy inferences need be drawn from this" is 
not clear, unless he ranks bis readers among the incurable 
optimists who expect phenomena every day. 

* * * 

— The National City Bank is boosting the sardine, referring 
with satisfaction to the increasing exports from the United 
States. But have we really many sardines to export? For there 
are many fishes which taste no better for the nomenclature 

"sardine." 

* # * 

— From the same authority — always a good one to go by — we 
get interesting data concerning the increase in the world use 
of electricity. The United States is the largest manufacturer 
and exporter of electrical machinery and apparatus and — not 
unimportant — is able to fix prices. 

* * * 

— "Coming events cast their shadows before them" and the 
Southern Pacific Company's revenues will be feeling antici- 
patory inflation, due to the long list of forthcoming fairs, exhi- 
bitions and the like, that are easily reached by their line. En- 
quire of any agent for a list; one misses many things one 
would like to see, through not hearing in time. 

* * * 

— In this connection I suggest a thought directed to the red 
metal, a thought transference to copper securities, a watchful 
eye on the price trend of both actual and comparative. 
At present, the price of copper is not any too high : it can- 
not fail to go higher shortly, and security values are not, 
even now, much ahead of metal quotations. The rising 
tendency of copper is already anticipated in security prices, 
but the man in front is not sprinting to East. 

* * * 

— Copper, steel, oil and the leading railroad stocks, with 
courage, and Christmas. 1925, will find m\ readers in fine 
spending form. For the investor, the second and fourth; 
the others for the man who is not virtuous by necessity. 
In all, discretion, because there are weak members in every 
group, as there was a Judas among- even the Twelve. 
* * * 

— The lot of the counselor is not a happy one. for his ad- 
vice is rarely considered as a whole nor do details receive 
proper attention. And he is fallible. So when I give leads, 
be sure you understand them before you act. ( )r write me 
fi ir assistance. 

(Continued on Page IS) 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

ILATELY THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY) 

SAVINGS _ COMMERCIAL 

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One of the Oldest Banksln California, 

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Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1924 

Assets $96,917,170.69 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,000,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 461,746.52 

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Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

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HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid Up Capital »20.000,000 $20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

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Phone Douclas 2244 



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by mail 70c. 

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SAN FRANCISCO 




January. 31, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVER1 ISER 



17 



Wheat and Chaff 

By Nathaniel Anderson 




H 



Nntlinniel AnderNOn 



"OW much alike are the 
very different races (if the 
world ! It is not only that they 
eat, drink and grieve wherever 
they live, but it is strange that 
the costums and habits, as well 
as methods of business in one 
countrv often become a part of 
its aliens, and while these peo- 
ples still bear the strongest 
marks of their native lands. 
It is amusing in America to 
hear a Russian or East Indian 
handle the country's slang with 
proper force or nonchalance re- 
quired. I always feel real 
neighborly to the foreigner 
who loves the language enough 
to nurse its wild offspring, and 
in such cases the more accent 
the pleasanter it sounds. 
But I have seen a Chinese street peddler of the type 
that requires at least the second generation to pronounce. 
He sold his ware by giving the crowd gathered around 
him in an alley way a little demonstration and a talk. It 
was all about his patent needle-threader and quick knotter, 
and when he worked it, it was — to him, "Simple! Simple!" 

* * * 

Governor served with warrant for arrest as term ends. 
That is apretty thing fur the youth of the country to swear 
by — and to steal by. Of course a governor may go wrong 
occasionally, but we hear too much of officials honoured by 
the people showing what they think of the respectability 
and responsibility of their offices in accepting bribes for 
favours or misappropriating funds. 

Here is an official who cannot get along with four or six 
thousand a year, so must get into trouble by misdeeds ; and 
there we learn of a worthy steel labourer willing to work 
for ordinary wages in order to support wife and three chil- 
but who cannot any more because, while at his industry, 
a piece of steel flew into his eye, for which he received in 
damages some sixty-four dollars. 

* * * 

What are some writers going to do, we wonder." Every 
Other day or so one who knows knocks into smithereens 
one of their stock phrases or theories. A hole was put in the 
hackneyed idea of the cave man strenuousness when a 
scientist said a few days ago that the ancestral supposed 
rough beau was n>>t so at all when he wooed his woman. 
From what the professor said he was so careful in his de- 
meanor toward his love that butter wouldn't melt in his 
nn.uth. This will shorten somewhat the supply of books 
and short stories published. Getting down to modernity, 
who can now say, that coming to the altar and marriage 
register, "the blushing bride" did thus or so? The Reverend 
[oseph Wallett, pastor in Southport, England, says. 
all bunkum." tn other words, her cheek- d< 
nor mantle — It's all spilt milk, as it were. 

* * * 

Everything goes wrong, if we 5tay around on earth long 
enough. In 'the first place we marry, and can't get along- 
some of us. Then we are told the best thing is to stick it 
out. "Bear and forbear," and now according to Judge Joseph 
11. Koford of Alameda County, divorced couples who be- 



"lt is 
not suffuse, 



come reconciled, seldom stay so, despite the fact, which is a 
strong one, that the tie of minor children often brings the 
re-marriage or reconciliation. 

* * * 

Did you ever go through a period when you decided not 
to think so much of yourself? I do not mean about your- 
self, but of yourself. Alter deciding you have given your 
heart the feeling for too much credit for merit and ability, 
you become modest, over-modest, sometimes. Just keep 
up this attitude toward your own individuality, and notice 
how your initiative and joy of life passes on to somebody 
else — somewhere. It surely leaves you. 

* * * 

About the best way to explain our dislike for girls smok- 
ing while in college, and doing a few other advanced things, 
is to remark that life should not begin too soon. We move 
a long time down the pathway of this earthly existence — at 
least long enough to pick up everything in the ua\ of 
habits and notions. No use getting too smart while at 
school. 

* * * 

Andre Ferrier, at La Gaite Francaise, is having particu- 
larly fine success with "Le Fleur d'Oranger." The acting 
of this little French company is very enjoyable. It is in 
its fifth season, and if the Gaite players continue to please 
as they do in "La Fleur d'Oranger," we expect not only 
many seasons of the company, but to see it one of the city's 
institutions. Both Monsieur Ferrier and Madame Ferrier 
deserve much commendation for their firm efforts, involv- 
ing hard work the public little realizes. 



Established 28 Years 



EXTRA HAIR 
COVER THE BOB 



EVENING 



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WEAR 



NOW BEING SHOWN AT 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

815 Clement Street San Francisco 360 Geary Street 

2331 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley 
MR. AND MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 



Qasa de zJXtanana 

La Jolla, Cal. 

San Diego County 

Southern California's new season 
hotel, located directly on the 
ocean shore on Coast Boulevard. 
100 rooms, 100 baths. Built in the 
Spanish Renaissance style. Has 
all of the up-to-date comforts of 
the modern hotels of today. Only 
strictly fresh products used on 
our table. Cuisine American. 
Rates from $8.00 per day and up- 
ward, American plan. Special 
weekly and monthly rates. Write 
for illustrated folder to 

CASA DE MANANA 
La Jolla, Calif. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 31, 1925 



FINANCIAL 

(Continued from Page 10) 

—The Los Angeles Times is broadcasting stories and leg- 
ends of the Indians of the Southwest every Friday night 
(KHJ). For which we have to thank primarily the Santa 
Fe officials, who, recognizing the wonderful storehouse of 
myth, romance and legend, that lies buried in the several 
tribes which inhabit California, New Mexico, and Arizona, 
decided to bring some of the more interesting features more 
prominently before the public. 

* * * 

••Filling up the Panama Canal" is the title of a pamphlet 

received from The Intermediate Rate Association, Spokane. 
May I suggest that newspaper men have a terrible lot to 
read, and that their eyes should be considered? What is 
sent is doubtless both interesting and important, but the 
type is far too small. My loss and that of my public. 

* * * 

— 25.000 new gas consumers this year is the Pacific Gas & 
Electric Company's estimate. 35,000 or more consumer,- of 
electricity will be added. We grumble at the service oc- 
casionally, like spoiled children, overlooking the obvious 
fact that with rapid expansion comes hitches. We have a 
lot to be thankful for that we are not at the mercy of a public 
body in the matter of light and heat. 

* * * 

Incidentally, I am asked what I think about Carbon Mon- 
oxide. I try 'to avoid thought on such subjects, but if any- 
one is getting nervous about the recent deaths attributed 
to the odorless imp, he had better write to the gas company 
serving his district. He will learn that he lies under no 
necessity to consume the dangerous product. Like most 
other evils, Carbon Monoxide is easily eliminated, if reason- 
able precautions are taken. The scare headliners should be 
treated to a big dose, every time they start the hateful 
game of poisoning the public mind. 

* * * 

Another letter asks what I think of "The Garbage Trust." 
I must respectfully decline to meddle in what is not a finan- 
cial question. It costs money to be sanitary, whoever you 
employ to help you. Some people prefer to be otherwise, 
or expect their work done for nothing. 

The Board of Fire, reviewing the forest fires situation, 
draws attention to a point too often overlooked in this 
connection, that the prosperity of this region "depends on 
the maintenance and increase of the present water supply 
and on flood control," adding that "the first steps neces- 
sary in accomplishing these ends are indentical, namely, the 
preservation of the watershed cover from damage or de- 
struction by fire." Lumber is important, very important, 
but water is vital. More pipes, fewer cigarettes, far fewer 

fires. 

* * * 

Rowell Strattan, globe trotter in excelsis, is of opinion 
that San Francisco is fated to be the biggest city in the 
world. The bay will make the story, becouse you cannot 
have big trade without water accommodation for big ships 
— lots of them ; without the right location for your water 
accommodation; without an interior country, accessible 
to your water, capable of producing the things the world 
wants, without the right climate blend for comfortable 
working conditions. I think he is right in giving us at 
least twenty millions as the population figure a century 
hence. Like him, I do not know. 



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iilf Motor Oils 




Are recognized by the highest authorities in engine 
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quality — 

A PURE PENNSYLVANIA PRODUCT 

VALVOLINE OIL COMPANY 



462 Bryant St., San Francisco 



122 Center St., Los Angeles 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that a vigorous brushing once or twice a day Is 
taking very good care of them. Brushing In only a part of the 
process. Many things can hnppen to yonr teeth which only a 
competent dentlHt can take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as Hound as you imagine, A toothache meant* 
trouble; do not wait for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth sore? Do your gums bleed? Call in today 
and talk It over. It will cost nothing. My nerve blocking sys- 
tem blocks off all nerves and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfield 33S 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions) Crowns; Self (leaning Bridges) 

Porcelain Work and Roofless Plates 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED AND GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per day; $7.B0 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage of Automobiles 



SANITARY DRINKING WATER 

For Homes, Offices and Factories. Quality Guaranteed 

KEYSTONE WATER COMPANY 

130 Russ St. Phone Hemlock 170 San Francisco 



ARE YOUR BRAKES SAFE? 

We Specialize on Brakes Only— Flat Prices on All Cars 

S. F. BRAKE SERVICE 

ST. FRANCIS GARAGE, 1240 POST STREET 

(Bet. Van Ness Ave. and Franklin St.) 

Phone Prospect 1915 




TEL. FRANKLIN 3685 
Metal Work Apper- 
taining to Automo- 
biles — Oxy-Acetylene 
V elding — Black- 
smithing. 

AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



Income Tax Service 



Advice Given and Returns Made at Your Home, 
by Appointment. 

J. Leo Park 

230 Russ Building — 235 Montgomery Street 
Phone Garfield 5364 



January, 



1925 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller, 
National Automobile Club 

THE report of the Committee of 
Nine appointed by the Governor 
two years ago to make a survey of the 
state highway system and to recom- 
mend additional roads for inclusion 
into the primary and secondary con- 
struction plan, was submitted to the 
< rovernor and the State Legislature last 
week. 

The report was a distinct surprise as 
well as a disappointment to every dis- 
trict in the state. Overcome by the ex- 
tensive demands urged upon them by 
communities in various parts of Cali- 
fornia, the Committee decided to cut 
down its recommendations to the mini- 
mum and where more than two thousand 
(2,000) miles of highway were asked 
for, the Committee recommended only 
196 miles for additions to the primary 
system. 

( >f the ten roads recommended, three 
were in northern California and seven 
in southern California. The three in 
the north were : 

San Rafael to l't. San Quentin, 3 
miles. 

Crescent City to the Oregon line, l 1 ' 
miles. 

Alturas to the i Iregon Line, 44 miles. 

Ilie seven roads in the south were: 

from Coleville to the Nevada State 
line in Mono County, 10 miles. 

From Bakersfield to Mojave. 65 miles. 

From Needles to Topoc, 16 miles. 

From Shavers Wells to Coachella, 25 
miles. 

From Blythe to the Colorado River, 5 
miles. 

from Oxnard to the main coast high- 
way. 2 miles. 

From San Diego to Tia Juana, ~ 
miles. 

But the Committee of Nine did not 
stop at merely, suggesting that these ten 
roads he included in the primary system. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISI'.K 

hut added the suggestion that no other 
additions he made, no matter whether 
they were introduced as separate hills in 
the Legislature or were matters of press- 
ing need to the communities interested, 
in order to side-track the various hills 
introduced for the purpose of increasing 
the primary system mileage, the Com- 
mittee recommended that all of these 
roads be classified in the secondary sys- 
tem which automatically postpones their 
construction for a period five years hence. 

This means that San Francisco and 
Oakland, will be bitterly disappointed 
through the fact that the Bay Shore 
Highway, so necessary to the develop- 
ment of the San Francisco Peninsula, and 
the Victory Highway link, which would 
bring trans-continental travel into the 
bay cities, fall into the secondary class. 
It also means that no traffic relief is 
provided for the San Fernando Valleys 
and that Kern County will not have its 
highway to the coast. 

Scores of roads recommended by the 
State Highway Commission and various 
communities about the state were placed 
in the secondary system by the Commit- 
tee of Nine. 

The general tenor of the report was 
such as to convey the idea that it was 
advisable to halt all state highway con- 
struction in California for the next year. 
A bond issue of $25,000,000 to be placed 
before the voters at the next general 
election was suggested as a means of 
financing the highway program. In ad- 
dition to this, it was urged that funds 
be provided either by an ad valorem tax, 
a levy on the gasoline, an additional 
license fee or some sort of weight tax. 

The general effect of the report on all 
sections of the state was decidedly un- 
favorable. It stunned the enthusiasm of 
the exponents of good roads, it dropped 
like a bomb-shell on the hopes and plans 
of the Highway Commissioners them- 
selves and it was a deep disappointment 
to the motorists and the motor car deal- 
ers of the state. 

The members of the Committee of 
Nine included: Senator A. II. Breed, 
Hi lector of the California State Auto- 
mobile Association; Elmer P. Bromley. 
author of the Bill which created the 
Committee of Nine; Louis Everding of 
Areata, R. M. Morton, State Highway 
Engineer ; George G. RadclifF, Chairman 
State Board of Control ; Arthur E. Loder, 
Chief Engineer of the California State 
Automobile Association; J. 1!. (nil of 
San Bernardino and J. II. Newman of 
Tulare. The ninth member of the Com- 
mittee. E. E. Fast. Chief Engineer of 
the Automobile Club of Southern Cali- 
fornia, did not sign the report of the 
Committee of Nine. 



Roads in the vicinity of Alturas have 
been kept open all winter, according to 
the Touring Bureau of the National 
Automobile Club. 



19 



Motorists en route to Santa Cruz over 
die Los Gatos-Santa Cruz highway are 
advised by the Touring Department of 
the National Automobile Club to drive 
very carefully on turns especially during 
cold weather. Many of these turns are 
shaded and as a result in cold weather 
the ice does not have time to melt and the 
hasty application of brakes may result 
in the car skidding into the enbankment 
or off the road. The road from Los 
Gatos to Soquel via Wrights is open 
and in fair condition. However, some 
muddy stretches will be encountered in 
shady spots and unless it is absolutely 
necessary to use this road would advise 
that all traffic go via the main highway. 

ANNUAL MEETING 

The Joshua Hendy Iron Works 

The regular annual meeting of the stock- 
holders of The Joshua Hendy Iron Works will 
be held at the office of the corporation, No. 75 
Fremont Street, San Francisco, California, on 
Tuesday, the 10th day of February, 1925, at 
the hour of 10 o'clock a. m., for the purpose 
of electing a Board of Directors to serve for 
the ensuing year, and the transaction of such 
other business as may come before the meet- 
ing. CHAS. C. GARDNER, 

Secretary. 

Office: 75 Fremont Street, 
San Francisco, Calif. 



General Auto Body Repairing 

Stationary Top General Trimming 

Telephone Market 1835 

Tom Meek 

Auto Body Building 

Company 

710 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 

San FranelHCO, Cal. 

Radiator and Fender Repairing 
THOS. J. MEEK 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 

Wilson Bros. Co, 

Incorporated 

tiW 9§ MWtKET STREET 

Bet. Frnnklln and Go Die h 

Telephone I'ark -71 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 31, 1925 




By KEM 
"I will give some of my 8,760 hours during the year to good 
reading." 
Resolutions for Readers 

SINCE the beginning of the year automatically starts us 
along the well beaten paths of making good resolutions, 
here is a list from the Publisher's Weekly, of January 3rd 
with some suggestions for the average reader attached, viz. : 

"I will meet every book with an open mind." Even the 
books that Professor Stuart, leading American critic, ad- 
vises are of the "Emetic School of Fiction," therefore when 
in a mood to read a "record of experience so humiliatinglv 
painful, and a vision of souls so atrociously ugly," we will 
look up some of Ben Hecht's, Maxwell Bodenheim, Sher- 
wood Anderson's and their followers, and try to figure out 
why their emancipated heroes and heroines fail to inspire 
or charm. 

"I will not read the last page first." Because if the 
books belong to the Romantic School of Fiction, the hero- 
ine and hero are invariably in each others arms, as best 
depicted by Ethel Dell and Berta Ruck, much beloved by 
young readers — and if they're not, the reader had better 
not anticipate that sad fact. 

"I will renew friendship with old books." How about 
finding out that "Jane Eyre" is still interesting; that Jane 
Austin's "Pride and Prejudice" shows she was a realist, 
who knew how to handle unlawful situations ; that George 
Eliot in "Adam Bede" and in fact in all her books, knew 
how to depict the "victim-villain" situation satisfactorily; 
that Thackeray in the "Newcomes," and Hawthorne in 
"The Scarlet Letter," solved ably the problem of figuring 
out the point at "which the maintenance of legal chastity 
involves the loss of ethical integrity." 

"I will try to be patient when the author draws a moral?" 
Very few of them do it nowadays — it is the fashion to draw 
an Immoral. 

"I will come to a sad ending with a dry eye — or I will 
try"; not so hard after all, as most of the heroines of ultra- 
modern fiction like the one in Michael Arlen's "Green Hat" 
and MacFadyen's "Windows Facing West," kill them- 
selves and are much more worth-while dead than alive. 

"I will not finish a stupid book simply because I have 
started to read it"; that's according to the point of view, 
as it would cut out the flabby-flesh fiction for the normally 
minded — that the "half-baked" reader would be craving. 

"I will try not to use violence when any one tells me how 
a story ends" ; it will be a much-tried resolution. 

"I will be wary of those books which are written to be 
funny"; we know their ear-marks, fortunately. 

"I will never get too old to enjoy stories for children"; — 
"Alice in Wonderland," "Wind in the Willows," and "Little 
Boy Lost," for they appeal to all ages. 

"I will always believe in fairies whether they are true or 
not"; sixth-sense people tell us Santa Claus has been 
thought-pictured till he's materialized in the psychic plane, 
so why shouldn't much-loved fairies be there with him, too, 
in this so soon-to-be mapped-out and explored mental 
realm? 

"I will read in bed and prove to the doctor that it doesn't 
matter" ; all over the land where an electric cord can be 
strung to a bed are readers of hectic fiction, who often need 
a doctor, they say — readers of scientific or philosophical 
works, who seldom have their pulse felt, and readers along 
psychological lines who declare they are their own doctor — 
so it's for the reader to decide how much it matters. 

"I will not skip description for conversation" ; if it is a 
young girl-reader and a romantic book, of course she will. 



"I will remember that authors of books are merely men 
and women and not gods" ; yes, but will H. G. Wells re- 
member it? 

"I will not irritate my friends by reading out loud to 
them" ; except a tidbit, now and then, from "Perfect Be- 
havior." 

"I will not forget to read the Bible sometimes" ; a good 
many others must be reading it as it continues the world's 
"Best Seller"! 

"I will use good books as food for the mind" ; such as 
Drinkwater's "Outline of Literature, Art and Science" and 
"The American Mind in Action," by Harvey O'Higgins. 

"I will try not to be provoked by a mere author's power 
over me" ; but try to understand why. 

"I will lead myself as fast as possible away from trash"; 
with a backward look perhaps for "well-written trash," 
that is to be found in all the modern libraries, because 
people will "Oh, Oh," so, if you haven't read Hecht's 
"Slumky-Slinky," or Looseone's "Sunk Off the Deep End." 
But never before have vital problems and changing con- 
ditions demanded more of men and women of honor 
and intelligence to be mentally alert — and never has there 
been more helpful, constructive literature to meet this de- 
mand. Happy is the man that findeth Wisdom ; the man 
that getteth understanding — the proverb reads — and we all 
want to be happy, so the trash will have to go off "the deep 
end," too. 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

a/PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 

239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



Make yourself at home at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tillmann Place, at 241 Grant Ave. 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Rare Books — First Editions — Pine Bindings 

Importations from Zachnsdorf. Boot, Morrell, etc., of London 

Commissions in London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

Phone Kearny 5816 



Be Photographed This Year on Your Birthday 




STUDIOS IN ALL 

PRINCIPAL CITIES OP 

CALIFORNIA 



Oakland 

408 14th Street 

San Francisco 

41 Grant Avenue 



St. Mary's Academy 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 



For particulars address 
SISTER SUPERIOR 



Select Boarding and Day School Under the 
Direction of the Sisters of St. Dominic 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Snlta Preaaed By Hand Only— Suits Called For and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

PARISIAN DYEING AND CLEANING 
521 Po«t Street San FrancUco 

In Vlrclnla Hotel Pbone Franklin 3510 






lanuarv. 31, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



21 



Hollywood Gossip 

By Madeline Jamison 



MARY Pickford is going to be a little girl again and every- 
body is glad — including Mary — for sbe has not been, al- 
together, a success as a "grown-up." "Dorothy Vernon of 
Haddon Hall," Mary's last picture, was very beautiful as 
a work of pictorial art, but as a vehicle for the Mary Pick- 
ford that we knew and loved, it was a disappointment. 
Mary was lost in a maze of costuming and setting. In 
her new picture, "The Rooney Family," Mary will play the 
part of a young Irish girl, who attempts to earn her own 
living ; a humorous, vivacious part in which she will again 
be a lovable, .whimsical child wearing short dresses and 
long golden curls. 

Douglas Fairbanks, Mary's husband, is making a new 
picture, too, which promises a new thrill. A romantic 
Spanish tale, full of color and action, called "Don Q." 
Lovely Mary Astor is to play the lead with Doug. 

We have been hearing for some time now, that Harold 
Lloyd is going to film "Alice in Wonderland" with his wife, 
Mildred Davis, as star, but it seems that Mildred is so 
taken up with the new Lloyd baby and the joys of mother- 
hood that she is not anxious to go back to the hard work 
of picture making. 

Speaking of Babies, there are two new ones expected to 
arrive at the Film Colony in the near future. It is reported 
on good authority, that Charlie Chaplin and Herbert Raw- 
lison both expect to become fathers in the spring. Herbert 
wants a boy, but Charlie is said to be partial to girls. 
Here's hoping that the s'.ork doesn't get them mixed. 

Winifred Westover Hart may go back to work in pictures, 
too, since the court has decided that the clause in her 
settlement contract with her husband, William S. Hart, is 
illegal. Bill Hart is very anxious that she shall not use his 
name to in any way enhance her film value, and it is said, 
will appeal the case immediately; but from the notoriety the 
case has been given, it would seem that the using of the 
mere name "Hart" for advertising purposes, would be un- 
necessary. 

It is a secret yet, but it is whispered about that two young in- 
ventors at Santa Monica have perfected a camera lens that will 
revolutionize picture making. By means of their invention, 
the figures and scenery in the picture will stand out full and 
round just as they did in the old stereopticon view pictures 
ue used to look at when we were children, that is: having 
depth, seemingly, instead of being Hat as they are now. 

It is rumored that Mr. Lasky lias had the idea for a long 
time and has spent a great deal of money trying to gel such 
a lens perfected. Several men have been experimenting for 
him but they have been unable to produce a lens that did not 
flicker. It is reported that he has bought the right to use the 
new lens from the young inventors. 



Strong Breeze 
The wind has freshened. 

The sea's in flower. 
The moon looks out of 

Her porcelain tower, 
Though the sun will not be gone for an hour. 

Try not to take it as a matter of course. 
This is no moorland of heather and gorse ; 
This is no pasture for ponies or cows. 
We've an acre of froth about our bows . . . 
Come, Piers Ploughman, look out of your house! 
— Grace Hazard Conkling 



Northern California Horse Show Association 
Loula Long Coombs of Kansas City, developer of some of 
the best known horses in the world, will attend the North- 
ern California Horse Show in the Oakland Auditorium, 
February 6th to 10th inclusive, it became known at show 
headquarters yesterday. Miss Coombs wired Sam K. 
Kramer, secretary-manager of the show, that she is bring- 
ing seven of her prize champions to Oakland. Marco and 
Irving Hellman, millionaire sportsmen of Los Angeles, 
have entered forty horses, including their famous stock 
animals. They are bringing from the South, a coach-and- 
four that once belonged to James Gordon Bennett. 

The classifications have been so arranged as to make it 
possible for every type of horse to go on exhibition. There 
will be Shetland pony events for children and a class for 
amateur men and women to ride or drive in competition. 
The polo division is well cared for with the recent entries of 
the San Mateo Polo Club and polo entries by the United 
States government. 

It is estimated that more than five hundred social fav- 
orites from distant cities will journey to Oakland to witness 
the competitions. They will be welcomed at the show by 
the founders of the Northern California Horse Show As- 
sociation. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE 

The Mineral Development Company, Location of Principal Place of 
Business, San Francisco, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a regular meeting: of the directors 
held on the 13th day of January, 1925, an assessment of one-half cent 
per share was levied upon the issued capital stock, of the corporation, 
payable immediately in legal money of the United States, to the Sec- 
retary, at the office of the Company, Room No. 237 Monadnock Build- 
ing. San Francisco, California. 

Any stock on which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 20th 
day of February, 1925, will be delinquent and advertised for sale at 
public auction, and unless- payment is made before will be sold on 
Friday, the 20th day of March, 1925, to pay the delinquent assessment, 
together with costs of advertising and expense of sale. 

M. J. SEELY Secretary, 
237 Monadnock Building, San Francisco, California. 



"The City 
On a Hill" 



An attractive page in Sunday's Rotagravure Section 
shows some of the natural beauties of Marin county in 
and around Sausalito. The women will enjoy the up-to- 
date fashions "For Springtime" and there are many 
notables from "Around the World." 



"The Mission 
Dolores 



99 



features San Francisco's most historic structure in a 
most interesting page. There are news pictures both 
"Light and Serious;" some well known "Diplomats in 
Review," and a first page featuring "Novelties of the 
Stage." Don't miss the 



Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 






22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 31, 1925 




-the better it gets- 

|cj>5£Po7] 




GEO. W. CASWELL 



Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 



1,800,000 cups were nerved at the Pan- 
ama Pacific International Exposition 



Have Your Car 

DUCO 

ENAMELED 

Our System Will Give a 

Permanent Luster 

Does Not Fade Nor Crack 

This We Guarantee 

See Our Demonstration Car 
Everluster Auto Enameling Co. 



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Franklin 2775 



TMelands 



TiHwStep" 



PETROL PARAGRAPHS 

(Continued From Page 19) 

The Committee of Nine and Seven- 
Eighths 

The Committee of Nine may have had 
difficulty in agreeing on a slate highway 
program but the Committee of Nine and 
Seven-Eighths that met in Sacramento 
last week didn't have any trouble at all. 

The integral members of the Commit- 
tee which was called into conference at 
Sacramento the other day included a 
select few of those interested in motor 
vehicle legislation who have been sitting 
around patiently for the last two years 
waiting for the Committee of Nine to 
declare itself, and the other seven- 
eighths was a stray newspaperman who 
ambled around in time to jot down 
some of the details. 

Here are a few of the items included 
in the report of the Committee of Nine 
and Seven-Eighths : 

1. Immediate construction of import- 
ant tourist lanes between Honolulu and 
the mainland as well as a connecting road 
between Santa Catalina and Los Angeles. 

2. Immediate construction of a tun- 
nel under the Sierras to provide an all- 
season route into California and insure 
transcontinental travel from being lured 
into Los Angeles by the potent wiles of 
that southern metropolis. 

3. Lincoln and Victory Highways to 
be continued to a point outside the three- 
mile limit so that incoming tourists may 
have something to look forward to in 
the way of western hospitality. 

In order to save the expense of over- 
head crossings, it was suggested that rail- 
way trains and electric cars be compelled 
to stop at all crossings and concede the 
right-of-way to motor driven vehicles. 

As a means of providing funds for 
this great road program it was suggested 
that the state establish repair stations 
along the highways entering California, 
the revenue from which would be suf- 
ficient to provide ample funds for the 
construction of new roads within the 
state. 

The minority report contained only 
one recommendation : That no more 
Committees of Nine be appointed. 



Exhibit of Franklin Simon & Co. 

Members of the fair sex, who are de- 
sirous of knowing Fashion's forecast for 
the season, should visit the exhibit of 
Franklin Sinn in & Co., to be held at the 
St. Francis Motel, on .Monday. February 
the 9th, to Friday, February the 13th, 
inclusive, and view some of the swagger 
models which this exclusive shop will 
present. New York's up-to-the-minute 
styles for women will be paraded; also 
Styles for infants, children and girls, and 
we predict that the Fashion Show of 
this smart Fifth Ave. shop at our local 
hostelry, will be one of the important 
affairs of the month. 











Tel. Prospect 6979 




GARAGE 


639 Turk Street 
San Francisco, Calif. 


a. 

The above firm means lots to the auto- 
mobile owners. For a small monthly 
payment they take all your automo- 
bile worries away from you. Your car 
is kept in first-class mechanical condi- 
tion. It's greased and oiled. It's towed 
in San Francisco free of charge. Re- 
placement of parts up to $50 free, in 
case of damage by collision. 10 per 
cent discount on oils and greases and 
gasoline. Automobiles washed for 
$1.50. And other features. 

Investigate, or phone for 
representative 




, PIONEER 



The 
Name ■ 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
41 First Street, San Francisco 



NOTICE OP ANNUAL MEETING OP 
STOCKHOLDERS 

Notice is hereby given that the annual 
meeting of tin.- st-.ckhold.-rs <>l pattkusun 
RANCH COMPANY, a corporation, will be 
held at the office of the corporation, to-wlt: 
the "Directors Room," in the office of the 
Union Trust Company of San Francisco, at 
the junction of Market and O'Farrell streets 
and Grant avenue, San Francisco, California. 
on TUESDAY, February 10, 1925. at the hour 
of ten o'clock a. m.. for the purpose of elect- 
ing directors for the ensuing- year and the 
transaction of any other business which may 
properly come before the meeting. 

W. W. PATTERSON. Secretary. 



Time 




Card 



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10:20 


6:20 




10:20 


6:00 


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I 


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1 


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6:40 


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7:20 


> 


11:20 


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< 


11:40 


7:20 


NOON 


8:00 


5 


NOON 


7:45 


12:00 


8:30 




12:00 


8:15 


P.M. 


9:00 


r- 


P.M. 


8:45 


12:20 


0:30 


oe 


12:20 


9:15 


12:40 


10:00 


o 


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1:00 


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i 


1:00 


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CO 


1:20 


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•11:30 




1:40 


•litis 


2:00 


•12:00 


ui 


2:00 


•11:45 


2:20 


•12:30 


z 




•12:15 




•1:00 


1- 




•11:45 



•Saturdays. Sundays, 

Traffic. fSundnys and 

AVEIV 



. Holiday* — Extra Trips During- Heavy 
Holidays only. 
J. HANFORD, Pres. and Gen. Mgr. 



[COOKS] 



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6:00 P.M. Owl 8:50 A. M. 

7:40 P.M. Padre (runs via Coast Line) 9:35 A.M. 
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Similar Service Returning 

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Incorporated 

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\V.\i. B. i riBSON, Mgr. Phospect 4296 



«"5f- 



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before You 'Build 
visits- 

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Exhibit of 
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BUILDING MATERIALS 
HOME EQUIPMENT 



31am Floor 

55 New Montgomery Street, San Francisco 

Opposite Valace Hotel 



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FOOT OF HYDE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
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TIME TABLE 

EFFECTIVE OCTOBER 15, 1924 



1 



Leave Sausallto 



A.M. 


P.M. 


6:00 


12:30 


6:30 


1:00 


7.00 


1:30 


7:30 


2:00 


8:00 


3:00 


8:30 


4:00 


9:00 


4:30 


9:30 


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10:00 


5:30 


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6:30 


11:30 


7:00 


12:00 


7:30 




8:0( 




8:30 




9:00 




9:30 




10:30 




11:30 



Leave San Francisco 
(Hyde Street) 



A.M. 

6:30 

7:00 

7:30 

8:00 

8:30 

9:00 

9:30 

10:00 

10:30 

11:00 

11:30 

12:00 



P.M. 

12:30 

1:00 

1:30 



:00 

:30 

:30 

:30 

:00 

:30 

:00 

:30 

7:00 

7:30 

8:00 

8:30 

9:00 

9:30 

10:00 

11:00 

12:00 



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Make Necessary. 



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DECORATIVE LIGHTING FITMENTS 

The standard of fine residential lighting 

PERFECLITES 



The standard of efficiency in commercial lighting 

PARCELLS-ARNEST 
COMPANY 

Authorized Dealers 



Complete Lines of Electric Lighting Fixtures 
for Immediate Installation 

55 New Montgomery Street Phone Garfield 4980 

SAN FRANCISCO 



You are invited to call at our show rooms in the Sharon 
Building (Exhibit of Building Materials) to inspect these 
fine fixtures. 






WL 



m m_ 



Take Advantage of These 

Tremendous 
Possibilities 

The Taxicab business has made millions for its owners 
in Eastern cities. It is only in its infancy here, with 
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There is only 1 cab for every 2000 people in San Fran- 
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Make your money grow. Become a part owner in 

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We want everyone to be a booster for us. You may buy 
one or more shares of our stock at this time at $10.00 
A SHARE. Upon completion of this financing, applica- 
tion will be made to list this stock on the San Francisco 
Exchange. Mail the coupon without delay. 



"Ride in 
Your Own 
Cab 
and Pay 
Yourself 
a Profit" 



.1. A. HMD!, President 

Checker <'«!> Co. 

HM5 California St., Sun PrniielMcn. 

I ] I am interested. Please send full 
details. 
] Please reserve Cor me shares 
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Name 



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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7 ,1925 



I 



LOS ANGELES 




./ Sierran Symphony: 

"Over nil broads an intense 
silence, the silence of the 
snow, than which nothing 

is more silent. 




KOHLER & CHASE 

Established 1850 
THE AMPICO IN THE 

KNABE $18SO and Up 

FISCHER $1050 and Up 
FRANKLIN $845 and Up 

■B TERMS Z=iii 



Why Your Friends Own The AMPICO 

YOUR friends have become the possessors of the Ampico 
because they, like you and every one, love music. It is 
because they have found that a piano or player piano 
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family he cannot always be commanded to play as the 
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of all kinds, as the Ampico is. 

For those long weeks when Nature turns her austere side 
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side, there is a certain lure to enchant us and carry us far on 
the road to happiness and that is Music. Well has Music 



been called the greatest of the Arts, beginning indeed where 
the others leave off for she vibrates in accord with them all 
and goes far beyond them all. 

She bears us to the Isles of Romance and takes us by the 
hand into moonlit gardens and we walk with her by the 
blue sea and feel the fresh wind in our faces. She takes us 
gayly dressed to the Carnival. She recreates for us the 
strange sounds of the Orient. We stand by the cradle as the 
mother sings to her babe. We dance, we laugh, we sing and 
even weep with her who holds in her powerful grasp all our 
joys, all our emotions and plays on them as she will. 

Music in its effect on man has a greater power than any 
other single influence and a home in which music dwells is 
a real home. 

We would tell you how the Ampico brings this, the 
divinest of the Arts to dwell under your roof. The keen 
enjoyment that it brings may be obtained at a compara- 
tively small outlay. It costs very little more than the price 
of the recordings for its upkeep. It depreciates in value 
very slowly and will continue its usefulness for many years 
and during its lifetime will prove to be an unending source 
of pleasure. 

Creating as it does a musical atmosphere in the home and 
contributing to the joy of the entire family, it is difficult to 
estimate the return for the investment which the Ampico 
will bring. 



Sacramento 
Fresno 



KOHLER & CHASE 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

1850—75 Years in California— 1925 



Oakland 
San Jose 




DECORATIVE LIGHTING FITMENTS 

The standard of fine residential lighting 

PERFECLITES 

The standard of efficiency in commercial lighting 

PARCELLS-ARNEST 
COMPANY 

Authorised Dealers 



Complete Lines of Electric Lighting Fixtures 
for Immediate Installation 

55 New Montgomery Street Phone Garfield 4980 

SAN FRANCISCO 



You are invited to call at our show rooms in the Sharon 
Building (Exhibit of Building Materials) to inspect these 
fine fixtures. 



before You ^uild 
"visit 

Sharon Building 

Exhibit of 
Building Material 





E*t»b1Uhtd July SO. 1&56 

SAN ^NC«*Co 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

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Jr.. from 1SS4 to 1925. Is now printed and published by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 235 Montgomery St., San Francisco, California. Telephone 

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SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1925 No. 6 



Vol. CVI 



— Social climbers delight in securing "lions" for their func- 
tions, but half the time the "lions" are only papier mache 

— The first essential in love is devotion ; so Leatrice, when 
your squire shows a tendency to forget engagements with you, 
or otherwise treats you negligently, this is the beginning of 

the end. 

* * * 

— "I would rather save one kiddie of the street than build 
the most beautiful edifice in the world,' says his eminence, 
George Cardinal Mundelein, Archbishop of Chicago. 

* * * 

— After all the wonderful strides that have been made to 
facilitate transportation, we must turn, in a matter of life 
and death, such as the diphtheria plague in Alaska, to man's 
most faithful friend, — the humble dog. 

* * * 

— When Mr. Bronte, the father of the Bronte girls, was 
accused of being eccentric, he answered: "You'll allow me 
to say that if I had been as concentric as most people, I 
would not have had these daughters." 



— Several masculine members of the English nobility 
have turned their attention to needlework, and will com- 
pete at an exhibition of soldiers' handiwork to be given by 
Princess Mary in the near future. No doubt numerous 
"Anglo-maniacs" in our own country will take up the gentle 
art and we may see the day when commuters of the sterner 
sex will turn their eyes from cross-word puzzles to cross- 

stitches. 

* * * 

— "Thanks to the application of the Dawes Scheme." says 
the English "Times", "Germany is rapidly recovering eco- 
nomic stability; the nation as a whole and individual citi- 
zens can lay their plans, draw up reasonable budgets, and 
calculate ahead. Financially Germany is recovering. The 
Currency is fixed, prices arc steady, and familiar processes 
of economic intercourse are working once more without 
too great friction. The chief causes of psychological and 
social disturbances have been removed." 



— Judge Geo. M. Bourquin, who has come from Montana 
to assist in the United States District Court here, states 
that Prohibition will be a complete success when another 
generation has grown up and public opinion appro 
Each generation appears to be wilder than the last, and the 
people who prate of "prohibition being of wonderful 
value to the rising generation" seem to be blind to the fact 
that it is the rising generation who is indulging itself to 
the limit in the forbidden fruit. 



— Frank T. Sharpe, secretary of the Big Brother Move- 
ment of Toronto, Canada, claims that the unnatural life of 
a city, with its many by-laws forbidding the very things 
that are necessary to a real boy existence, is the cause of 
a great deal of delinquency in the growing "kid". The 
"temporary placements in country homes, away from the 
nervous strain of city life, giving the boy the unadulterated 
joy of the open air and boundless fields, accomplishes much 
in eradicating youthful crime." 



— This is what Captain Duncan Matheson, of the Howard 
Street Methodist Episcopal Church has to say anent juve- 
nile crime, which seems to be flooding the courts at present : 
"Our boys and girls go everywhere but home. . . . 
Seventy-five per cent of the arrests in San Francisco last 
year were of offenders between the ages of seventeen and 
twenty-four. . . Very few juvenile prisoners have ever 
gone beyond the seventh grade in grammar school. . . . 
It would be well to consider the weakness of the parents 
and the schools, rather than stressing the weakness of the 
boys and girls." 

* * * 

— A rural policeman was being examined in a case wdiere 
one of his brother patrolmen had been seriously wounded, 
but all the efforts of the judge and counsel had failed to 
keep his testimony within the rules ; every kind of illegal 
evidence poured forth in answer to the court's questions. 
At last the judge advised him to tell it in his own way, and 
make it as short as possible. This is his story : "The man's 
wife came to see mc and find out what the doctor had to 
say and whether poor Peter was going to live or not. I 
went in to see the doctor, and he talked a lot, but I couldn't 
make head nor tail of what he said. So I says to her: 
'God help you, Ma'am. I'm afraid Peter's done for; from 
what the doctor's saying, all his Latin parts have been 
shot away.' " 



— Igor Stravinsky. Russian composer, and one of the 
leading spirits of the "Modernist" movement, is reputed to 
have the keenest ear on record. He once told a fellow com- 
poser that he could "hear distinct tones caused by the vi- 
brations of the water" in a certain lake in Switzerland. 
Well, we are not a musical composer, — far from it. — but 
right in our rippling, rushing California streams we can 
distinguish musical tones and cadences. Did you ever stay 
up all night just to find the hour when a brook in the Santa 
Cruz mountains changed its key? In that "darkest hour 
before the dawn" when the earth seems to stir and quicken 
in its sleep, the low murmuring of the waters turns into a 
l;ghtcr. brighter sound, as if the coming of day should be 
heralded always, all through the long, long centuries with 
ng of gayety. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 7, 1925 




The Community Chest is a San 
The Community Chest Francisco institution nowadays and 

involves a social responsibility that 
cannot be shirked. So far has this notion gone, that Mayor 
Rolph stated categorically the other day. "The cause of the 
Community Chest is die cause of San Francisco." The cam- 
paign begins on February 10th and lasts for ten days and within 
that time it is necessary to collect the sum of $2,492,546 to 
meet the needs of the distressed, sick and helpless of this city. 
It may strike one that this is a large sum of money to expend 
upon the needy in a city as prosperous as our own and in which 
the standard of living is so high. But the best accounting and 
the most skilled social experience have proved that the raising 
of this sum, large as it is, as a matter of fact, constitutes the 
cheapest form of social insurance of the right sort that we can 
have. The fund is well administered and there is no doubt at 
all about the highmindedness of those engaged in its distribu- 
tion. A few years ago, such a grant for such a purpose would 
not have been even contemplated. Concerning this the Mayor 
says: "The Legal Aid Society does constructive work. It is 
a law clinic of the city. It serves the widow and the poor man, 
imposed upon, but unable to get funds to start litigation. — It 
sees that justice is done and in that way contributes to the well 
being of the individual." So it appears that the Community 
Chest carries with it an ethical significance of great value. A 
Community, in which one man parts with money so that another 
may get justice is a pretty sound community and carries all 
sorts of fine potentiality. It is painful to part with coin, but 
the Community Chest is worth the suffering. 



It will come with a shock 
Federal Retirement Annuities to most of us that the re- 
tirement annuities of the 
federal government are on a much lower basis than either 
municipal or state annuities and much below those of sev- 
eral private corporations. For that reason, and in the inter- 
ests of simple justice, we are greatly in favor of a speedy 
affirmative action on the bills now before Congress for the 
amendment of the present practice and the placing of faith- 
ful governmental employees on a more satisfactory basis 
than at present. It is perhaps not generally known that the 
employees themselves contribute 2}4% of their salaries to 
the fund and the new bill provides that they pay 3 J/2% to 
provide for an optional retirement at the expiration of 
thirty years'service, at the age of fifty-eight for mechanics 
and sixty-three for clerks. It is proposed also to increase 
the maximum retirement annuity from S720, the present 
annuity, to $1,200. The average annuity now paid is ridicu- 
lously small: about $40 per month. To obtain this, prac- 
tically a life-time must be spent in the government service 
as voluntary retirement is not provided for ; so that it is 
quite possible for an employee to serve as long as forty 
years without being able to retire on allowance unless he 
has attained the actual age of retirement. We may contrast 
the payment by the federal government on retirement with 
those of municipalities, like Chicago, which pays a maxi- 
mum of $50 per month, and Philadelphia, which pays $100. 
Boston pays the annuity which the employees' accumulated 
contributions will purchase, plus an equal contribution by 
the city. Private corporations make an even better showing. 
For the credit of the federal government the proposed 
amendments should be passed as early as possible. 



There is a report, continually cropping up, 
No Millenium but having more and more force behind it 

each time, so that there must be something 
in it, however improbable it may appear on the surface. The 
report in question is to the effect that France, Belgium and 
Germany may terminate their quarrels and mutual suspic- 
ions and arrive at an agreement of mutual security by which 
they will insure one another against agression and military 
attack. At first blush, this, considering the amount of ill 
feeling which has been developing over so long a period of 
time, will appear absurd, but sober second thoughts reveal 
the fact that, in the long run, international affairs are solved 
not by passion but by material interest. And there is much 
materially worthwhile in the suggestion. Several times it 
has been pointed out that a pooling of the industrial re- 
sources of the countries in question would produce an 
amount of material strength which would give the continent 
a very fair chance to make a successful fight for markets in 
competition with Great Britain, on the one hand, and the 
United States on the other. The Stinnes and Loucheur inter- 
ests are alive to the necessity of making such an arrangement 
between France and German)- as regards coal and steel as 
will transcend the merely national boundaries and will per- 
mit of the amalgamation of French and German interests in 
the direction of world-market control ; or at least of gaining 
a new and more eminent position in that world-market. 
The savings in military expenditures alone is enough of a 
bait to drive all the industrialists and commercialists into 
camp together to put a stop to the wasting of resources and 
the taxation of necessary capital. The material advantages 
are all in favor of the new idea. Perhaps the psychical 
factors can be discovered. It would be great psychological 
publicity which would produce a state of mind on both sides 
of the Rhine in favor of mutual trust. Should such a con- 
summation be reached, it might be reasonably considered to 
be the most valuable human achievement to date. 



Judge George Bour- 
The Pardoning Power of the Jury quin, at the trial of H. 

B. Ramsey, former 
cashier of the First National Bank of Willits, made a very 
clever and forceful comment which sheds light upon the 
otherwise unaccountable actions of juries. There were 
thirty-nine charges against Ramsey, among them many 
charges of embezzlement. The jury found him guilty on 
one charge only and recommended him to mercy on that. 
They found him guilty of making false reports to the Con- 
troller of the Treasury, for which he was fined $250. The 
judge was angry and said that he did not see how the 
members of the jury could reconcile the verdict with their 
oa'th. He said it was plain to anybody that if the man was 
guilty on one count he was guilty mi the other counts, and 
went on : "There must have been something wrong with 
your eyes when you did not see the other allegations of the 
indictment." In other words, the judge gave the federal 
jury such a roasting as has seldom been administered in the 
federal building. Then, as a conclusion, he hit the nail on 
the head. He said: "You have attempted to exercise the 
pardoning power in this case. However, since you are the 
jurors, I must abide by your verdict." That is the secret of so 
many of the queer verdicts and one of the reasons why jury 
trials are so often considered farcical, and why the agitation 
against juries grows at times. We have no better jury in the 
country than the usual federal jury. It is composed of men of 
position and character and quite above the average in intelli- 
gence. Yet even they, will at times forget that they are there 
just to pass upon the facts under the instruction of the court, 
and that they have no right to interfere with any of the 
processes which do not pertain to their particular office. 
It is not for the jury to exercise pardoning power, to want to 
mitigate punishment, or to increase it. These are matters 
with which they have no concern and such being the case 
should keep their hands off. Judge Bourquin has given a 
needed lesson. 



February 7, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



One never knows how reports start and 
A Crazy Report what sort of interpretation is likely to be 

placed on the most innocent acts and words. 
We are as a community, under fire in the East and likely to 
have a diminution of well-to-do visitors, owing to a canard, 
which was started and circulated in the East without any 
real foundation in fact and which is yet capable of doing 
quite a lot of mischief. Amendment 9 of the Constitution, 
which was passed at the election last November, refers to 
the taxation of foreign securities. It enables the discovery 
of foreign securities in the hands of residents, for the pur- 
poses of taxation. This has been converted by the jade 
Rumor into a statement that the roads into California are 
watched by officers of the law, who take tourists out of 
their cars and examine their persons and machines for evi- 
dences of stocks, bonds and jewelry on which a tax will be 
levied. So that thousands of well-to-do people in the East 
are considering whether they will make the trip, while they 
are liable to be held up and compulsory taxed by the legal 
banditti infesting the California highways. It would be 
ludicrous if it were not a trifle serious, for nothing is too 
absurd to take root and receive acceptance. There are, no 
doubt, many amiable and trustworthy people, who believe 
the rumor today. There is only one way in which it can be 
met and that is by authoritatively setting forth the facts ; 
which are, that no steps are being taken to look for foreign 
securities ; that tourists are subject to no taxation at all ; 
that foreign securities cannot be taxed unless they are de- 
clared by their resident owners; that, when so declared, 
foreign securities are assessed at seven per cent of their face 
value ; and then they are taxed on that assessed value only 
at the same rate as hold generally good for taxation in the 
given city or county. A tax on a $1,000 foreign security 
would be about $3.50. Here, then, we have an example 
of the way in which this very modest and quite necessary 
piece of legislation is being heralded to the world. 



The country has done 
Child Labor Amendment Defeated what we thought and 

hoped it would, and 
the child labor proposed amendment, by which the federal 
government would have the control of the labor of children, 
until they were eighteen, throughout the country, has been 
defeated in the first round. No constitutional amendment can 
pass, with thirteen states against it and already that number 
has registered protest against the measure. The, only states 
voting to support the measure so far are California, Nevada 
and Arizona, three of the most Westerly states. Why did 
these states support it? Because they have less faith in 
local self government than the rest of the country? No, their 
reasons were entirely creditable. As a matter of fact, the 
provisions as regards child labor in these states are so good 
that they have an exalted standard with regard to pro- 
vision for childhood and they wish this standard to be uni- 
versal. They would even go the length of diminishing the 
power of the state and increasing the federal supremacy 
to make those standards available to the children of the 
whole country. That was poor politics, in the higher sense. 
The state and local governments have bard work to main- 
tain themselves against the encroachments of the federal 
government, thousands of miles away. It is a good thing 
that the Amendment was lost. But those states whose 
treatment of children has been such as to bring about this 
agitation, had better take warning. If there is one thing 
that we of the \Yest are determined upon, it is that our 
children shall have every advantage of education and play. 
of freedom and sunshine that the community can give 
Already our standards of physical well-being and develop- 
ment in our public schools excel anything yet attained. 
The Greeks could not measure up to the high schools of our 
state; our high school girls are the finest feminine product 
anywhere, 



A Letter of Appreciation 

January 31st, 1925 
San Francisco News Letter 
San Francisco, 

Dear Mr. Editor: 

Permit me to thank you for your hearty approval of the 
Chronicle editorial "As Others See Us." 

Little wonder that our British relatives were astonished 
to hear that we in America treated our horses and steers 
in the brutal manner as shown in the cheap heroics of the 
professional rodeo. Permit me to say that bull-dogging 
and bull-baiting never were and are not now permitted 
by the Cattle Barons of America; their business is a serious 
one, though in days gone by, owing to unavoidable condi- 
tions, they may have at times, been accused of cruelties. 
The hardships of the range are many, but owners do not 
deliberately engage in pastimes detrimental to their eco- 
nomic success. 

The San Francisco Society for the Prevention of Cruelty 
to Animals and the California State Humane Association 
will, however, continue to keep an eye on the so-called 
rodeo, which cannot even be considered as analogous to 
the round-up on the range. 

Cordially yours, 

JOHN PARTRIDGE, 

Pres. S. F. Society for the Pre- 
vention of Cruelty to Animals. 



Verdict in Favor of Del Monte Hotel 

< )ne of the hottest contested trials in recent history was 
that of the case of the Del Monte Properties Company, 
charged with the sale of liquor at the Del Monte Hotel on 
January 10th. The defense contended that if the law had 
been violated it was by the employes of the hotel and 
without the knowledge of the owners. A verdict of "not 
guilty" was brought in. 



A Unified Street Railroad System 
The matter of the unification of the San Francisco street 
railroads grows more pressing. For months there has been 
a certain shilly shallying about the proposition (which un- 
doubtedly has the support of all those who are aware of 
the facts). The municipal system is hamstrung under the 
present arrangement. It is impossible to harmonize and 
unify street railroad arrangements with any degree of satis- 
faction to the railroad management or the public. The 
municipal roads cannot extend themselves as they should; 
they are deprived of the bulk of earnings which is neces- 
sary for them to function properly and well run as they 
are, they are unable to make the grade in their present 
crippled and half-organized state. The only solution is 
the purchase of the other systems at a fair price. 



Dr. Haines Returns 

After an extended vacation and a long period of travel 
over the United States and Canada. Dr. Byron \V. Haines 
has returned to San Francisco and has opened offices in 
the Elkau Gunst Bldg. to resume practice, where he will 
be pleased to welcome his many friends and clientele. 



New Director for Del Monte Properties Co. 

The Del Monte Properties Company has elected YVm. F. 
Humphrey, president of the Olympic Club, a director in 
this company at a meeting of the board of directors held 
recently in the Crocker Bldg. The election was held to 
fill the vacancy created by the resignation of Captain John 
Barneson. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 7, 1925 




Pleasure's W^nd 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ lorn Moore, 




By Katherine Schwartz 
Formerly of the "Chicago Tribune" 



Curran 

WHAT is perhaps the best company^ Fortune Gallo has 
brought to us in many years, is playing to capacity audi- 
ences, and appreciative music lovers crowd the doors more 
with each performance. With the company are such splendid 
artists as our own Alice Gentle, Anne Roselle, Tamaki Miura. 
Manuel Salazar, Gaetano Tommassini, Stella De Alette, Na- 
tale Cervi, and others too numerous to mention in our limited 
space. 

This article would not be complete without making special 
mention of that versatile and talented conductor, Fulgenzio 
Guerrieri and his splendid orchestra. As an accompanist he 
is most sympathetic and as a conductor, a master. 

The repertoire for the second week includes "La Boheme". 
"La Traviata", "Carmen", "Lohengrin", "Faust", "Lucia Di 
Lammermoor", "Madame Butterfly" and "Aida". 

It is indeed a rare treat to San Franciscans to hear such 
splendid artists at the prices offered, and we are proud to see 
so many taking advantage of this opportunity. 

Tuesday night the opera given was "Aida". Just before the 
rise of the curtain, Gaetano Tommassini was taken ill, and 
Manuel Salazar stepped into the role at that late hour, acquit- 
ting himself in noble manner. 

Anne Roselle sang her way right into the hearts of San 
Francisco music lovers with the first note. In the difficult 
aria in the third act she showed herself for the dramatic artist 
that she is. Her coloratura work has seldom been surpassed, 
and her splendid art as an actor might well be copied by tra- 
gediennes of the stage. 

Manuel Salazar the guest artist with this splendid opera 
company is a valuable addition to the long list of artists in 
this company. In his rendition of the role of Radames he 
reached great heights, and in his glorious upper tones, he 
brought to the minds of the audience thoughts of the golden 
voiced Caruso. 



S. F. Symphony 

Two very talented pianists, Ellen Edwards and Allen Bier, 
contributed to a distinctly novelty concert playing the 
"Carnival of the Animals" by Saint-Saens with the Symph- 
ony Orchestra at the Curran Theatre last Sunday. Aside 
from the very tricky and difficult playing which it 
calls for from the various instruments of the orchestra, and 
which we may add, was wonderfully well played, one can 
not be impressed with the versatility of the man who 
wrote it. 

The rest of the very popular concert consisted of Wag- 
ner's Prelude to "Lohengrin", Good Friday Spell from 
"Parsifal" the Ballet Suite of Gluck-Gevaert ; Brahms' Four 
Hungarian Dances; and the ever popular "William Tell" 
Overture by Rossini. Special mention must be made of the 
splendid work done in this number by the 'cello section. 

A fine program is offered for the eighth pair of concerts 
this week when the Academic Festival Overture by 
Brahms, Three Jewish Poems by Ernest Bloch. Symphony 
in D Minor by Cesar Franck will be given. 

Tuesday evening, February 10, will be heard the last of 
the popular symphony concerts at the Auditorium, when 
Florence Easton, well known Wagnerian soprano, will be 
heard at the Wagnerian Concert. 



We all know how Dr. Hertz conducts Wagner, — there is 
none better, and every student and resident artist should 
set aside this evening and enjoy this concert. 



Orpheum 

Weber and Fields, the two great American comedians, 
will head the bill for a second week at the Orpheum. They 
will be assisted by Armand Kaliz and Florence Brown. 

Frankie Heath, song-dramatist, will return next week in 
a quartette of song stories ; Margie Clifton and her partner 
will be seen in classical posings and balancing. 

Dr. Bruno Steinbach, new to this country, is a pianist of 
rare ability, and well known throughout the Continent. 
Manning and Class are a team of clever wire dancers; Jim 
and Betty Morgan with their Collegiate Orchestra will also 
be there ; Billy Dooley and company with Merna Tibbits 
will offer "The Misfit Sailor" which is said to be a riot of 
comedy. Billy House, another newcomer to vaudeville, is 
a rotund comedian. He and his company offer a comed\ 
of love and lingerie entitled "Oh, Teddy". 



Golden Gate 

Next week the Golden Gate offers a comedy sketch 
"Say Uncle" featuring Sub Pollard and Company; Kara- 
vaeff, Russian dance interpreter, with his company of Rus- 
sian steppers, Harry Hines, musical comedy comedian ; 
Frank Hurst and Eddie Vogt in an amusing line of patter ; 
Neal Abel and McRae and Clegg. On the screen will be 
seen "Missing Daughters" with a strong cast, and Claude 
Sweeten and his orchestra complete the show. 



Strand 

Will King and his company have plenty of opportunity 
in this week's offering, "Oh Behave", to display their 
peculiar style of fun. The piece is full of laughs, and 
sparkles with many brilliant songs and dancing numbers. 

Howard Evans has worked out some very clever and 
artistic numbers, — chief of which are the opening number 
in black and white, with Mildred Markle, Clara La Verne 
and the chorus as pierettes. 

Will Aubrey, James, Ellard, Clara Larinoff, and Betty 
Bedashce win much applause in their Spanish numbers. 

Next week the offering of this company is called "Wrong 
Room". 



Wilkes 

Kolb and Dill, with their all star cast of celebrities, are 
still packing 'em in at the Wilkes in their riotous fun- 
maker, "Politics", with no sign of abatement as they go 
into their fifth week. 



Alcazar 

"Just Married" with its appeal to every theater-goer, is 
still delighting capacity audiences at the Alcazar, starting 
Sunday night with their fifth week. 

This amusing farce-comedy is packed full of ludicrous 
situations and gives Henry Duffy a great opportunity in 
a role for which he is exceptionally well fitted. 



February 7, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Amusements 

m:.\t week 



ALCAZAR 

O'Farrell nr. Powell 


l 


Henry Huil> lMnyer* 

"Just Married" 


ALEXANDRIA 

18th and Geary 


} 


Pictures 


CALIFORNIA 

4th and Market 


} 


"The Dancers" 

Featuring 
George O'Brien 


CAMEO 
936 Market St. 


} 


"Daughters of the 
Night" 


CAPITOL 
64 Ellis St. 


} 


"White Collars" 


BEATTY'S 
CASINO 

Ellis and Mason 


} 


"On the Stroke 
of Three" 
Vaudeville 


CASTRO 


} 


Pictures 


NEW 
COLUMBIA 

Eddy and Mason 


} 

J 


San Carlos Grand 
Opera Co. 


GRANADA 
1066 Market St. 


} 


"Devil's Cargo" 


GOLDEN GATE] 
G. G. Ave. and Taylor J 


Vaudeville and 
Pictures 


HIPPODROME 


} 


Vaudeville and 
Pictures 


IMPERIAL 

1077 Market St. 


} 


Marlon Dnvles 

'Janice Meredith" 


LOEWS 
WARFIELD 

988 Market St. 


} 


"The Great" 
Divide" 


METROPOLITAN 

2055 Union St. 


} 


Pictures 


NEW FILLMORE 

NEW MISSION 


} 


"Tongues of 
Flame" 


ORPHEUM 
O'Farrell and Powel 


} 


Vaudeville 


PANTAGES 
Market at Mason 


} 


Vaudeville 
Pictures 


PORTOLA 


r 


Pictures 

Piogrnni Changed 
Dally 


ROYAL 

1529 Polk St. 


} 


Pictures 


STRAND 
965 Market St. 


} 


"Wrong Room" 


WILKESg™" 
Geary and Mason 


i 
j 


Kolb and Dill 

in 

"Politics" 


WIGWAM 


} 


Pictures 



Capitol 

Starting on their eighth week at the 
Capitol, "White Collars" is still attract- 
ing theater-goers in that splendid play 
of the great middle classes. In the cast 
are Maryon Aye, Earl Lee, Charles 
Edler, William Lawrence, Bessie Eyton, 
Blanche Douglas, Ruth Stewart, Howard 
Lorenz and Westcott Clark. 



Concerts 



Pauline Frederick 

Owing to the popular demand, Pau- 
line Frederick will return to the Curran 
for a limited engagement in "The Lady", 
immediately following the San Carlo 
Opera Company's engagement next 
week. 



Cameo 

Next week the feature at the Cameo 
will be "Daughters of the Night"'. This 
is the story of a telephone girl, and is 
filled with romance, intrigue and excit- 
ing climaxes. 

Joey Ray and Billy Hill will give an- 
other entertaining program of songs, — 
many of which Mr. Hill has written 
himself. 



New Columbia 

One of the most important announce- 
ments to devotees of the theater is that 
Olga Petrova will open at the New Co- 
lumbia February 9, in "The White 
Peacock". 

Ever since she was seen here a few 
weeks ago in "The Hurricane" requests 
have come to her that she appear in this 
play which, like "The Hurricane" she 
wrote herself. While much different in 
theme, "The White Peacock" is a play 
of unique situations, intrigue and ro- 
mance. Mine. Petrova has surrounded 
herself with the same cast that was with 
her in "The Hurricane", many of whom 
played in the New York production of 

"The White Peacock". In addition to 
producing "The White Peacock" Mine. 
Petrova will be seen in "The Hurricane" 
at the Wednesday and Saturday matinees 
during the second week of her engage- 
ment. 



Sugar cane waste is now being con- 
verted into a coarse form of board used 
in lining walls. 

The total trade done in Russia last 
year represents only about 10 per cent 
of the trade in 1913. 

The first woman's club in the United 
States was founded in Boston by Anne 
Hutchinson in 1638. 

The fusee still used in clocks in the 
original form was invented by Jacob 
Zeeh of Prague in 1525. 

Algeria sheep are comparatively im- 
mune to anthrax, while all other sheep 
seem extremely susceptible to it. 



New Columbia 

Vladimir De Pachmnnn, Sunday Afternoon, 

-::io, February 8. 



Auditorium 

Romim Choir, 2:S0, Sunday Afternoon. Febru- 
ary 8. 



S. F. Symphony 

Curran Theatre, Sunday Afternoon, Febru- 
ary H, at 2:45 n. m. 



. ^>^ U P a y no """"^ 



fiESTFLOWEgg 




"TMfoloa o/« Thousand Gardens' 

224-226 Grant Ave. Tel. Kearny 4975 




TAILOR AND IMPORTER 
Latest Styles and Materials 

Moderately Priced 

527 Post St., opp. Olympic Club 

San Francisco, Cat. 




HARRY DIXON 

INTERPRETS 

YOUR IDEAS 

IN METAL 



241 GRANT AVE. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



NOTICE OF ASJIHAt MEETING OF 
STOCKHOLDERS 

Notice is hereby given that the annual 
meeting of the stockholders of PATTERSON 
RANCH COMPANY, a corporation, will be 
held at the office of the corporation, to-wit: 
the "Directors Room." in the office of the 
Union Trust Company of San Francisco, at 
the junction of Market and O'Farrell streets 
and Grant avenue. San Francisco. California, 
on TUESDAY. February 10. 1925. at the hour 
of ten o'clock a. m.. for the purpose of elect- 
ing directors for the ensuing year and the 
transaction of any other business which may 
properly come before the meeting. 

W. W. PATTERSON. Secretary. 



As much as eight pounds of tortoise 
shell may be obtained from one hawk's 
bill turtle, one of the marine turtle^ of 
the tropics. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 7, 1925 






Once upon a time, following one of our noteworthy oc- 
casions, an appreciative visitor declared : "San Francisco 
knows how." 

We have been eating that candy ever since. 

Wonderful and wholesome was the gratifying praise pro- 
nounced, sincerely, by the great, whole-souled man, Mr. 
Howard C. Taft, then President of the United States. 

He meant what he said, and that is one reason, perhaps, 
why we liked him so ardently and valued so highly what he 
said. But — we, San Franciscans, would now like to post- 
script those radiant words which we have paraphrased and 
commercialized and tell the world that: "We're improving." 

One reason that San Francisco has the glorified reputa- 
tion of "knowing how" is that she makes no effort to do the 
things she registers. Everything is done spontaneously, 
enthusiastically, and naturally. The city may know how, 
but it is all without any attempt at premeditated glory. 

The city is naturally gallant, courteous. 

San Franciscans are naturally hospitable. Officials drape 
our streets with flags, bunting and banners for memorable 
affairs and play at the work with utter abandon. Citizens 
decorate their stores on the first intimation of a gala event, 
and they have the time of their lives doing it. 

All these things are part of the happiness which perme- 
ates the entire commonwealth. 

Everybody is happy in San Francisco ; or, pardon, he 
or she should be. If he lives near San Francisco Harbor long 
enough, he is, and that's a certainty. The rarest specimen 
the city provides is the grouch. 

When the noted visitor told us that San Francisco 
"knows how," he was, inadvertently, defining for us a 
higher standard, for ever since that immortal speech we 
have been trying to out-class ourselves. 

San Francisco has become a city of conventions. 

They hold sway here by the hundreds and they will con- 
tinue to do so as long as its citizenry, its efficient Mayor, 
James Rolph, Jr., and other pull-together officials, keep 
step with the times. 

The Golden Gate is hospitably wide open. The latch- 
string of the city hangs within the reach of the welcomed 
stranger. "Welcome" is traced across the very skies, be- 
cause hearts are warm, business is stable and common sense 
tops every concerted plan in which men, women and the 
youth of the college and the soil feel personal pride in telling 
anew the story of the famous man when he told us : 

"San Francisco knows how !" 



By Antoinette Arnold 

ticular occasion. The newly appointed Consul-General of 
Japan, was host to the commanders of the Japanese and 
American naval squadrons. 

Hundreds of lanterns of fascinating shades swung against 
a background of rare sketches. Streamers and festoons 
floated from the elegant walls and balconies. The room was 
a veritable palace of flowering rareties with the Japanese 
quince, the soft ambers and the lighter shades vieing for 
preference. It was a land of beauty, ostensibly, hiding the 
white elegance of the room, and completely converting the 
palatial appearance into an alluring out-of-doors. 

Honored guests included the most distinguished represen- 
tatives of the diplomatic and naval services of America and 
Japan. Vice-Admiral Henry A. Wiley, in command of the 
United States Navy squadron, and his staff, and Wallace M. 
Alexander, chairman of the Citizens' Committee, with City, 
State and Federal officials were prominent attendants at this 
brilliant affair. 

Mme. Toshihiko Taketomi, wife of the newly appointed 
Consul-General of Japan, proved herself a most charming 
hostess, assisting her honorable husband in welcoming the 
guests. 



Yosemite at the Fairmont. 

From Cherry Land, with flowers of fascinating bloom, to 
Yosemite Valley in winter-time is a stretch of the imagina- 
tion but an easy task for the Fairmont people. 

Last week the ballroom of the Fairmont was the scene of 
a miniature Yosemite Valley with moving pictures visual- 
izing the glories of the National Park under the sweep of 
snow. 

The Linnard Special this year has a number of enthusi- 
astic people in the party who will venture into the gay 
sports of skating, sleighing, skiing and other winter-time 
novelties for sunshine folks. Every thing that could be 
done to make the visitor enjoy the vision of the matchless 
valley was perfected by the Fairmont. Mr. Le Roy Linnard, 
whose efficiency has placed the great hostelry in a place by 
itself; Mr. John S. Mitchell, whose superior direction of 
everything makes for perfection, were prominently super- 
vising well-devised plans in giving their guests a glimpse 
of Yosemite. 

It was a rare treat to those fortunate enough to have been 
guests of the Fairmont. Rudy Sieger's music as usual was 
something superlatively fine. All combined to make an 
evening long to be remembered. 



Japanese Reception. 

One of the handsomest receptions given in San Francisco 
during the visit of the fleet this past week took place in 
the gold ballroom of the Fairmont Hotel, Tuesday night, 
January 27. 

Brilliant as the gold ballroom is at all times, it was a rare 
garden of flowering colors of variant shades on this par- 



last 



Floods Entertain. 

Mr. and Mrs. James L. Flood were hosts at a dinner 
week at their home in Broadway. 

Among those in the dinner group were Miss Inez Macon- 
dray, Miss Marie Louise Potter, Miss Mary Emma Flood, 
Lieutenant Atherton Macondray, U. S. N., Mr. Frederick 
Moody, Jr., and Mr. Atherton Eyre. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

050 Hush Street, Between Powell and Stockton, San FrancUco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter 0130 Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



February 7, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Writers' Luncheon 

Mrs. Fenwicke Holmes, the brilliant writer, 
whom Calif ornians are welcoming back to San 
Francisco, was hostess to a group of prominent 
people last Monday noon in the Courtyard Tea 
Room with Mrs. Adelyn Brickley Jones assist- 
ing as co-hostess. 

Nancy Buckley, the San Francisco poet and 
short story writer, who has made a splendid name 
for herself in a very short time was the honor 
guest. Miss Buckley leaves shortly for Europe 
and it was to extend her a bon voyage and a 
California "goodbye" that the charming hostesses 
called their friends for the friendly chat and 
pleasant concourse. 

Guests were seated at pretty little tables 
decorated in spring flowers. They included : 
May Robson of "Something Tells Me" who is 
now playing here in her own famous play; Mrs. 
Esther Birdsall Darling, author of "Baldy of 
Nome"; Anna Blake Mezquida, author; Miss 
Geneve Shaffer, Anita Day Hubbard, brilliant 
writer of "The Bulletin" ; Mrs. Ernest Wiggins 
of Washington, D. C. ; Dr. Hughes Cornell, au- 
thor of "Born Rich"; Mrs. Josephine Wilson, writer of 
short plays and stories ; Patricia Connors Morbio, singer ; 
Mrs. Leland, Miss Mary E. Kelly, Miss Austin, Josephine 
Bartlett, Chronicle; Miss Grave Havens, writer; Ruth 
Helen Davis, author, and others prominent in various 
creative fields. 

* * * 

Mr. William A. Magee entertained friends over the last 
week end at a stag party at Alder Farm, the Magee place 
in Fruitvale. 

The wedding of Miss Edith Grant and Mr. Magee will 
take place on Saturday, February 14, at the residence of 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph D. Grant in Broadway, and guests 
at the week end party included the best man and the ushers 
for the wedding. 

Those in the stag party were: Mr. Harry Hush Magee, 
Mr. James Moffitt, Mr. Kenneth Walsh, Mr. Tallant Tubbs, 
Mr. Charles Stetson Wheeler Jr.. Mr. Guy C. Earl of Los 
Angeles, Mr. Leon Brooks Walker, Mr. Walter Hush, Mr. 
Herbert Tietzen, Mr. George Montgomery, Mr. John ( tskell, 
Mr. Coy Filmer, Mr. Russell Wilson. Mr. George Tope Jr.. 
Mr. Cyril McNear, Mr. Monroe Grecnw 1. Mr. Paul Mc- 
Coy, Mr. Albert Shaw, Mr. Robert Hooker Jr.. Mr. ( ieoffre) 
Montgomery, Mr. Henry Cartan Jr., Mr. Wclhy Dinsmore, 
Mr. George O'Connor, Mr. Robert Miller, Mr. George Mc- 
Near, Mr. Howard Spreckels, Mr. Richard Schwerin and 
Mr. William A. Magee Jr. 

* * * 

Society and Horses 
The Oakland Horse Show has enlisted not only society 
and lovers of line horses around the bay, but attracted 
strings of blooded stock from north and smith and from 
points as far east as Kentucky. The < )akland Auditorium 
lias a capacity for 250 individual box --tails. A large arena 
is reserved for the judging and the holding of the various 
events. The background is a replica of an ancient Roman 
temple, a large canopy overhead, representing the starry 
sky. I 

Many blooded horses are featured in the show. Among 
the horses is a string of famous thoroughbreds belonging 
to Loula Long Coombs of Kansas City. Those horses are 




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from the horse show in Denver, where they car- 
ried away first prizes. This exhibit alone is said 
to be valued at more than one hundred thousand 
dollars. 

Don I lolman of Chicago has brought his Violet 
Hemming, said to be one of the most beautiful 
five-gaited saddle horses in the world. ( leorge 
Heyl, also of Chicago has brought bis entire 
stable of harness horses and ponies, including 
Model Gem, with trophies from Chicago, Kansas 
City and St. Louis. 

California, which for many years rivaled Ken- 
tucky as the home of notable horses, is contribut- 
ing host to this galaxy of American equities. 
From Southern California come the famous 
horses from the stables of Marco and Irving 
Hellman, Cecil de Mille and others. From the 
bay cities come the horses of P. E. Bowles, 
Cliff Durant, Mrs. W. P. Roth, C. H. Sooy, 
Howard Ransahoff, Mrs. Sydney Dannenbaum, 
and Mrs. Phil Wand. 

The show opened Friday and will run for five 
days, closing Tuesday of next week. 

Mrs. Louise Ghirardelli and Mrs. W. O. Heit- 
man are among the first of the society leaders to take a box. 
Herbert Halls and Ward Dawson, Donald Lamonts and James 

Eaves have made reservations for the Horse Show. 

* * * 

One Thousand People Will Appear in "Pageant of Youth" 

More than 700 players, including principals and the various 
important groups in the cast of the "Pageant of Youth," this 
week commenced daily rehearsals for the big production, which 
will be given the week of March 30 in the San Francisco Civic 
Auditorium in behalf of St. Ignatius College. The cast will be 
increased to approximately 1,000 people. 

Archbishop Hanna said in part: "At no time in our history 
was the need more pressing for bringing home to the heart and 
the conscience of all, the importance of the proper education, 
formation and safeguarding of our youth. This is done admir- 
ably in the 'Pageant of Youth.' The theme is noble, the lines 
inspiring, the setting artistic. The City of St. Francis is favored 
by the presentation of this magnificent pageant, which has 
created a sensation in Chicago and other cities. I heartily 
commend the 'Pageant of Youth,' not only to the members of 
my own flock but to all my fellow citizens who have the 
welfare of our nation at heart." 

East Bay Country Club 

Green-clad hills and the "pre-Spring" weather of the past 
fortnight attracted many members to the estate of the 
East Bay Country Club in beautiful Crow Canyon, twenty 
miles from downtown < >akland. The last two week-ends, 
groups of enthusiastic golfers played over the first nine 
holes completed on the eighteen hole course that has been 
laid out on a sporty range. 

The first women's golf tournament, a sweepstake event 
will be held at the club, February 25th. An attractive list 
of trophies is being arranged for the day. One of the fea- 
tures of the occasion will be a barbecue luncheon. 



J Social and Business Engraving \ 

Personal Service Given - Orders Called For [ 

at vour Home or Office. 

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t Telephone 419-4:3 Montgomery Street ' 

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Memorial Engrossing a specialty ) 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 7, 1925 




By Hoot McGregor 



Jack Houston announces that fifty-two Blue Lodgers 
are eligible to compete in Masonic golf tournament. 



Abraham Lincoln Brown had a bad year in 1924. He only 
played 364 times. 



Frank Klimm says George Duncan has nothing on him 
when it comes to perfect rhythm. 



George Habernicht says that swimming improves your 
arolf stroke. 



George Habernicht, the swimming teacher, will train 
his brother Rudie, so that he can cut his way 'round the 



Rudie Habernicht. George's brother, says Lakeside greens 
remind him of glass, they are so easy to putt on. 



Jack Houston, editor of the Masonic World, has donated 
a SI. 000 vase for the tourney. 



Dr. Herman Fowler Wilson hopes to beat Charlie Good- 
win for the grandfather's title. 



B. B. Page, the newspaper ace, has won lots of cups, but 
he's after that vase. 



Dr. Wilhelm Waldeyer has perfected his community 
chest drive. 



Harold Brayton, the minstrel booker, will leave his prune 
ranch long enough to make a score on the links. 



Ira Coburn a past pote, is sure to get Jim Symon's goat. 

Lee Dolson and his son Lee, Jr., have entered the father 
and son tournament. 



Henry Kleversahl, vice-president of the Humboldt Bank, 
has promised his assistance in case anyone wants to cash in 



Billy Gilmour and Jack Black, Harry Lauder's only rivals, 
will put on a minstrel show at the banquet. 



George Leathurby will have an organ on every tee. 



Commodore Harry Speas, of the good ship Golden Gate, 
will swap strokes with Captain James Madison. 



Bob "Dupont" Matthey will shoot them out of the 
bunkers. 



Jim Symon and Jack Hazlet, the two giant Islam Temp 
lars. have challenged all comers. 



Charlie Day will instal lamps in case Jack Ellery gets 
jst in the dark. 



"Pawnbroker" Bob Thompson will leave his four-wheel 
brakes at home, and patronize a Hyde Street car. 



Dr. Alfy McNalty hopes to make a score with his nifty 
golf togs. 



Jack Black the famed minstrel and clever comedian says 
his score will be in high G. 



Louis Campaglia, the sugar baron, has had to mortgage 
his plantation to pay his golf debts. 



Billy Gilmour, from the land of the heather, Harry Laud- 
er's only rival, will enter, providing he can find the ball he 
lost last month. 



Herb Billsbrough says that 585 is the only score he 
shoots. 



Louis Ghirardelli will shoot a chocolate ball. 



Bill "Pop" Eisert claims he's the king of the veterans. 



Frank Foran says that "Old King Coal" is the best ball to 
shoot under fire. 



Captain Urban "Stew" Stewart has perfected a brand 
new golf shot which he will wish on Bill Symon. 



Bill Worden claims he's the best golfer among the past and 
present potes. 



Eaton McMillan has got all his four-wheel breaks work- Johnny Crowe, crows everytime he gets in a vacuum cup. 

Q'_ — ^ — ^— 

Herman Hogrefe plays a dandy game whiles't shooting up 
his rents. 



Hugh King McKevitt, the Pote, says he prefers snow- 
balling to golf. 



Pete Gerhardt has been matched to run Nurmi 18 holes. 



Hugh made quite a hit at Yosemite. 



Albert Samuels says he can play rings around the course. 



Fd "Ironside" Bernard Olympic Club's champion billiard 
player, says Mowhawk adds speed and distance to the ball. 



Jack Black is anxious to play, providing he finds his re-paint 
he lost at Lakeside. 



Charlie Goodwin had a clean slate last month. Charlie 
hooked the boys each match he played. 



Harold Pracht. the famous Tenor, will sing his favorite song, 
entitled. I love golf, but oh you High-Ball. 






February 7, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 




By Edwin 

Boxing. The threatened split-up between Jack Dempsey, 
World's Champion Heavyweight title holder, and his 
manager, Jack Kearns, has been hinted at from many 
sources. However, people are just drawing- conclusions 
form the following facts: 

Since the retirement of Benny Leonard from the ring 
and from the Championship of his weight, there has been 
some wild scampering to find a good heir to the throne. To 
date no "heir" is "apparent." 

( )ne Mickey Walker is coming to the fore though, now, 
and there has been in the past certain negotiations be- 
tween himself and Jack Kearns as to management. But 
Mickey would not at that time play second fiddle for Jack 
Kearns, who was busy with his meal ticket, Mr. Dempsey. 
But through the rumors of retirement more negotiations 
are in the air, and Mickey will play the lead this time to 
the sole management of Kearns. Tex Rickard was also 
worried about Dempsey's decision as he too, made 
his fortune principally through Dempsey's ability to punch 
into the realm of dreams all the chance piano movers that 
happened his way, but the new alliance would help push 

the wolf away from the door for him also, for another year. 

* * * 

Polo. Since the first of the year California's climate has 
permitted much to happen in the sport of Kings. The Coro- 
nado Polo Club has had many very exciting practice games 
with their old rivals, the Midwick Country Club team from 
Los Angeles. The games have been held both on the 
Coronado field and in Los Angeles. 

The Burlingame team and the Del Monte team are at it 
continually, giving each other splendid practice games. 
When the season ucts well under way there will be some 
marvelous displays of real horsemanship. 

* * * 

Wrestling. Ed "Strangler" Lewis is still laying claimant 
to the title of Heavyweight Wrestling Champion, though 
he seems to forget that he is just fresh nut of the hospital 
from the wounds received in battle with the young college 
wrestler. Wayne "Big" Munn, is the youth that did the 
dirty work, surprising the entire wrestling fraternity, to 
say nothing of the fact that he may possibly have surprised 
himself even though the fall he "took out of" Strangler 
Lewis was no chance grip. The Strangler's hold on the title 
was getting almost similar to the hold which the other 
world champs of the various rings had secured, but new 
blond and talent entered when he wasn't looking. 

Lewis, however, will appear in the near future in compe- 
tition with Joe "Toots" Mondt, another heavyweight anx- 
ious to get "into the money." 

* " * * 

Trapshooting. Since dividing the spoils of victory in 
Paris last year at the Olympic Game with Montgomery of 
Canada, our Frank Hughes, of South Dakota, has laid aside 
another scalp. 

He took the Amateur Trap Shooters trophy for 1924 with 
a score of .9830 on 1000 targets. The nearest to him was 

Heer of Guthrie, < Iklahoma, with an average of ,9805. 

* * * 

"Amongst the professionals, Guy Ward of Lake Charles. 
La., was the high man. But Colfax of Wilmington. Del., 
who won the National championship, was not on the first 
ten men. 



F. Marriott 



Yachting. When the Big Annual Meeting of the Pacific 
Coast Yachting Association was held in San Francisco 
recently, they sanctioned the big Tahiti and San Francisco 
Yacht race that should go to the winds about June 10th. 

The race itself will be held from here to the Island and 
then after a brief visit the racing yachts will return and 
have for an escort many non-racing boats. 

Officers for the ensuing year were also elected at the 
meeting; Lester Stone, of San Francisco, receiving the 
admiralship, while James Griffith, of Seattle, was made 
vice-admiral. 



Time 




Card 



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X 


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1 


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•12:00 


111 


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2:20 


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z 




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•1:00 


i- 




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'Saturdays. Sundays, Holidays — Extra Trips During: Heavy 
Trnfllc. fSundays nnd Holidays only. 

AVEN J. HAXFORD. Pres. and Gen. Mgr. 



DR. B. W. HAINES 

DENTIST 

Elkan Gunst Building 
323 Geary at Powell Hours 9 to 4 

San Francisco Telephone Douglas 2949 



ASSESSMENT .NOTICE 

The Mineral Development Company, Location of Principal Place of 
Business, San Francisco, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a regular meeting of the directors 
held on the 13th day of January, 1925, an assessment of one-half cent 
per share was levied upon the issued capital stock of the corporation, 
pavable Immediately in legal money of the United States, to the Sec- 
r iry. at the office of the Company. Room No. 237 Monadnock Build- 
ing. San Francisco, California. 

Any stock on which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 20th 
day of February. 1925. will be delinquent and advertised for sale at 
public auction, and unless payment is made before will be sold on 
Friday, the 20th day of March. 1925. to pay the delinquent assessment, 
t other with costs of advertising and expense of sale. 

M. .1. SEELY Secretary. 
237 Monadnock Building, San Francisco. California. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 7, 1925 



LATVIA AND THE LETTS 

By H. W. Glensor, Consul at San Francisco 

for the Republic of Latvia 

Establishment of the consulate of the Republic of Lat- 
via in San Francisco has led to so many inquiries regarding 
this old country but new nation, that I welcome the in- 
vitation of the San Francisco News Letter to contribute a 
few facts concerning it. 

Latvia is the home country of the Lettish people who are 
neither of Slavic nor Germanic origin, but of the Indo- 
European stock from which all the white races, except per- 
haps the Semitic, have sprung. The Letts have distinctive 
lingual and racial characteristics, as well as legendary his- 
tory which goes back four or five thousand years. Their 
recorded history starts with the Northern invasion of the 
German Knights of the Cross in the twelfth century. The 
outcome of this invasion was establishment of the Baltic 
Baronies, which means simply that the German invaders 
dug themse'ves in, and appropriated the land with the 
Letts, the original owners, thereafter doing the work. 

The country thereafter was alternately under the domini- 
tion of Russia and Germany as various wars were won or 
lost. But thru all these the German land-barons remained 
in possession and control and the practical situation of the 
Letts was unchanged. 

At the beginning of the World War, Latvia was a part 
of Russia and the Lettish men of military age formed part 
of the Russian Army. When Russia collapsed in 1917, 
the Lettish soldiers, briefly stated, retained their state of 
organization, drove the Germans out on one side, the 
Russians on the other, established the Republic of Latvia, 
and for the first time in seven hundred years were in 
governmental control of their own country. 

Free at last, they had paid a terrible price for liberty 
thus achieved. Sixty per cent of the country's industries 
were destroyed, farms were cut up by trenches, dugouts 
and barbed wire entanglements; one half of the arable 
land was uncultivated and about eighty thousand or thirty 
per cent of her mobilized men were casualties. Had the 
United States suffered losses in proportion, our casualties 
would have numbered one million two hundred thousand 
men. 

Riga, the Capital, before the war was slightly larger 
than San Francisco, and is now slightly smaller. In the 
Riga district alone, 24,000 buildings were destroyed during 
the war. 

The new Republic, established in 1918, comprises about 
25,000 square miles in area and the Government is mod- 
eled after the Government of the United States. The 
country has about 350 miles of seacoast, three ports for 
deep sea vessels, 2000 miles of railroad, a state university, 
a standing army of 20,000 men, one battleship, 38 merchant 
vessels and a sturdy body of boy scouts. 

In their short national life the Letts have stabilized their 
currency, balanced their budget, paid off a substantial por- 
tion of their external loans, passed agrarian laws permitting 
agricultural development; in short, have organized from 
a people into a nation. 

Operation of national economic laws will, inevitably, 
soon bring about a closer contact and understanding be- 
tween the people of the United States and this Republic 
whose sun of liberty rose but yesterday. 



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FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that a vigorous I. rushing once or twice a day Is 
taking very good care of them. Brushing In only a part of the 
proce»M. Many things can happen to your teeth which only a 
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They may not be as sound as you Imagine. A toothache means 
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There are gum troubles that will destroy teeth faster than 
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tem blocks off all nerves and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. H0AGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfield 335 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions! Crowns; Self Clenning; Bridges) 

Porcelain Work and Roofless Plates 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE YOUR CABS WASHED AND GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Stornge of Automobiles 



SANITARY DRINKING WATER 

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ARE YOUR BRAKES SAFE? 

We Specialize on Brakes Only— Flat Prices on All Cars 

S. F. BRAKE SERVICE 

ST. FRANCIS GARAGE, 1240 POST STREET 

(Bet. Van Ness Ave. and Franklin St.) 

Phone Prospect 1915 




TEL. FRANKLIN 308S 
lletal Work Apper- 
taining; to Automo- 
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Welding — Dlnck- 
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Advice Given and Returns Made at Your Home, 
by Appointment. 

J. Leo Park 

230 Russ Building — 235 Montgomery Street 
Phone Garfield 5364 



February 7, 1925 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller, 

Director of Publicity 

National Automobile Club 

The Theft Bureau 

DIAMOND Dick and Nick Carter 
have furnished many a thrill, but 
the tales of the novelists pale into 
insignificance beside the stories of real 
life to be found in the files of the Theft 
Bureau of the National Automobile 
Club. 

The motor car thief is usually an 
up-to-date individual who finds in his 
chosen profession ample scope for the 
development of his criminal genius. 
The motor car itself furnishes quick 
transportation to and away from the 
scene of the crime and many individ- 
uals with the curious warp of men- 
tality that induces to law-breaking 
find a keen delight in matching their 
wits with the officers who enforce the 
law. 

A short time ago a motor car thief 
was apprehended by the Theft Bureau 
operatives who had acted as the leader 
of an organized "gang." After his var- 
ious aliases were traced, it was dis- 
covered that he had been at one time 
a champion chess player, heralded as 
a future world's title-holder. He was 
a college graduate with a keen, analyti- 
cal mind, but some queer derangement 
of his mental processes had led him 
to find a greater attraction without 
the law than within. 

lu some states, the thieves are a 
great political power, inasmuch as the 
"bosses" share in the spoils. Life is 
held to be of less intrinsic value than 
the motor car that figures in the case 
and the investigator that interfere-; 
does so at the risk of being blackjacked 
or murdered in some out-of-the-way 
location. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 

A short time ago in one of the west- 
ern states, an investigator was sent out 
to secure information on the operations 
of a gang of thieves. On his arrival 
in the town where he was to make his 
headquarters, he found every one seem- 
ingly friendly disposed. His suspicions 
were aroused, but he finally accepted 
an invitation from a casual acquaint- 
tance to spend a day in duck-hunting. 
Four men made up the expedition and, 
when the hunting grounds were reach- 
ed, the party divided, two going one 
way and two another. The youth who 
accompanied the investigator had been 
assigned the task of putting his com- 
panion out of the way through "acci- 
dental" discharge of his shotgun. But 
the youth was not an old hand at the 
game and, left alone with the investi- 
gator, confessed the plan and assisted 
in the latter's escape. 

In some localities in Montana the 
toxin of the stolen car game seems to 
have entered into the blood of the 
majority of people living in the dis- 
trict which, so far as law and order is 
concerned, might be mapped as outside 
the corporate limits of the United 
States. To buy a stolen car, knowing 
it to be stolen, is no crime in their 
eyes. Every move possible is made to 
block the efforts of law enforcement 
officers in identifying stolen automo- 
biles and returning them to their 
proper owners. The only crime, in 
the eyes of the people in these par- 
ticular districts, is to be caught. It is 
a common procedure for an order for 
a car to be placed with an agent of the 
theft "gang" who usually is a person 
of recognized importance in the com- 
munity. The order is usually for de- 
livery of the special make and type of 
car within a certain period, the cars 
to be "made safe;" that is. to have all 
means of identification removed. And 
the car is always delivered on time. 

The Pacific Coast states have an 
enviable record in the recovery of 
stolen automobiles. Ninety-eight and 
one-hall per cent of the cars stolen in 
San Francisco are recovered, while the 
proximity of Los Angeles to the Mexi- 
can border reduced the percentage in 
that city to 83 per cent. Seattle suf- 
fers from the number of cars taken 
over the Canadian border and is rated 
at 88 per cent, while Spokane last year 
had a 100 per cent record and Portland 
a 93 i>er cent record in the recovery of 
stolen cars. 

Last summer, the Theft Bureau of 
the National Automobile Club, in co- 
operation with the police authorities 
of Southern California, succeeded in re- 
covering twelve stolen cars from Mexi- 
co, some of which were insured and 
some not insured, all of which were 
stolen in the Imperial Valley. 



13 



< >ue of the interesting cases that 
came to light last week was the dis- 
covery of the $20,000 car which figured 
in the Katz murder trial in Los An- 
geles last year. On information from 
Los Angeles Police Headquarters, the 
Theft Bureau stationed representatives 
at Stockton, Sacramento, Oakland and 
San Francisco to keep watch for the 
arrival of the car in question with the 
result that twenty-four hours after the 
machine had been placed at a San Fran- 
cisco garage it was in the hands of the 
police and the man who drove it from 
Los Angeles was in a cell in the city 
prison. 

The stories of real life are every bit 
as full of thrills and interest as those 
that find their way into the plots of 
the short story writers and the novel- 
ists. 

(Continued on Page 19) 



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Phone Franklli. 217 
1829 Pine Street 
San FrancUco 



■IMP^ 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 7, 1925 



Good Eating at Gus' 

There are restaurants, and restaurants. There are the 
tea and lunch rooms and "coffee shoppes" and the Sally 
Anns and the Greasy Grills, ad nauseum ; a good majority 
of them being "fly-by-nights," that spring up all over the 
old town like mushrooms, and like mushrooms, vanish in 
a single day. 

And then there are the old stand-bys, the old names that 
one can conjure by, that still up-hold the reputation of our 
city as one of- the best places in which to eat, in the whole 
world. Gus' Fashion, at 65 Post Street, for instance ; like 
the restaurants your mother used to take you to, when you 
were a youngster, and going out for dinner (in the by-gone 
days, when "home" meant something more than a place to 
sleep) was a great event in your life. 

Have you ever partaken of Gus' Special Salad Louis.'' 
A meal in itself, full of epicurean surprises , or his ox-tail 
soup, or any of his wonderful fish specialties? Try the 
"Assiette du Tour" some day and find a broiled veal porter- 
house steak that tastes like chicken, with its surrounding 
garlands of fresh vegetables. And for dessert, say a hot 
apple dumpling with hard sauce; or that Parisian cream 
pie, filled with velvety custard and topped with meringue. 

And when you rise from the table, well-fed, well-served 
and absolutely satisfied, we will wager that you will feel 
like exclaiming as we did: "Fate! I defy you! I have 
dined today!" 



WHERE TO DINE 



They Are Legion! 

"Why don't they invent a device for driving from the 
back seat?" 

"Huh! Have you ever met my wife?" 
* * * 

Fond Father — What are you going to do for a living? 
Son — Write. 
"Write what?" 
"Home." 



One of the largest men alive recently left Hungary for his 
fatherland, Siberia, to assist his parents in farm work. He is 
34 years of age, nine feet three inches tall and weighs 458 
pounds. He consumes more than four times as much food 
as the average person. 

A new invention in the shape of an electric bundle tier has 
just appeared that will speed up parcel departments. The 
machine ties a strong square knot, cuts the cord and throws 
the bundle to one side. 



A new anti-bandit gun weighs nine and one-half pounds. 
It fires 1,000 shells a minute and has an accurate range of 
1,500 feet. 



A new airplane muffler has been perfected in Europe which 
does not reduce the efficiency of the motor. Silent flying has 
now become a fact after 18 years of effort by engineers. 



Orange groves in California are protected from the frosts 
by operating large fans on 20-foot towers. 



Plastic wood is a collodion preparation made with very fine 
wood meal and of the consistency of putty. It is claimed to 
be waterproof, will set hard and can be turned with a lathe. 
Nails can be driven into the dried material without crackintr it. 



The Canton Christian College of South China is importing 
American domestic animals and numerous plants and fruit and 
nut trees in an effort to improve the agricultural situation in 
that section. 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

THE MOST POPULAR RESTAURANT IN SAN FRANCISCO 
05 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4536 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners, $1.25. Meals Served a la Carte. 

Also Regular French and Italian Dinners. 

Fish and Game a .Specialty 



BLANCO'S 



O'Farrell and Larkln Streets 



Phone Frnnklln 



No visitor should leave the city without dining 
in the finest cafe in America 

m.) - - - - - 



Luncheon (11:30 to 2 

Dinner, Week Days 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays 



75c 
$1.50 
*1.75 



Mary Hereth Caroline Jones 

Luncheon is served from 11 :30 to 2:30 




' A «ni 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

ir.t Third Avenue, SA\ MATEO 



Featuring; Southern Cooking 

Open From 

11 :30 a. m. to 2:00 p. m. 

5:30 p. m. to 8:30 p. m. 

Sundays and Holidays 

4:30 to 8:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 
Half Block from Highway 



The only real artistic place in the Latin Quarter. Bohemian 

dinner, 75c — served every evening. Saturday, Sunday and 

Holidays, $1.25. Dancing from 7 to 1 every evening. 

BEGIN'S BOLOGNA RESTAURANT 

240 Columbus Avenue . Phone Sutter 8825 



Barhecue 

Chill Con C'orne 

Coffee 




Louis Cerles. Jean Barrere, John Piegth. Props. 

NEW SHARON GRILL 

Formerly Bergez-Frank's Old Poodle Dog-, Bush Street 

35 NEW MONTGOMERY STREET 

Opposite Palace Hotel Phone Sutter 8008 



Women's Building Sandwich Shop 

212 Ellis 

Breakfasts 35c-50c Lunch 50c Table d'hote Dinner 60c 

A la carte orders at all times 



Enchilada* 

TnmnlcM 

Ilrolled Steak* 



Red Bull Pit 

72 EDDY STREET, San Francisco 
JOE W. ANDERSON, Prop. Telephone Douglas 6198 



February 7, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 






LriNANOAU 



By PLUTO 

ONE hears all suits ,,f tilings about Los Angeles and 
the conditions there, but, as usual, money talks and 
we hear that the Los Angeles Investment Co. paid 
dividends amounting- to 24% on outstanding stock. The 
lompany's annual report states that the company paid off 
all of its indebtedness during the year. But "the most 
astonishing item of the report in face of the rumors is that 
of $6,499,427 due on payments from purchasers of houses 
and lots only one-half of one per cent were in arrears. That 
fact speaks volumes. * * * 

— All down the line the effects of the optimism due to the 
results of the last election are becoming more and more 
obvious. The people seem to have made up their minds 
that this is going to be an abnormally prosperous year and 
they are shaping the facts to suit their convictions. Thus, 
new financial operations are being undertaken by nearly 
all great concerns and the prospect appears to be rosy 
for investors. * * * 

— It is worth while noting that the same tendency to in- 
crease in the value of oil stocks is universal and that the 
New York market showed the effects even more markedly 
than our local market. It appears that there is a sharp 
decline in crude production, with the result that the storage 
of crude oil and gasoline is being heavily drawn upon. 
E-asoline prices have been advanced three times within the 
last two weeks by New York leading refining companies. 

* * * 

— The upward movement of railroad shares was due to 
to the splendid showing made by most of the roads in De- 
cember. There is a slight fall now but that is due to the 
necessary increase in operating expenses due to the damage 
wrought by storm involving the necessary repairs. 

* * * 

— Never in our history has improvement been more mani- 
fest. Manufacturing plants which began to languish last 
Hiring are again on the high road to greater development. 
There is some slight improvement in foreign trade, but 
nothing to boast about. That foreign trade question will 
soon become a leading one, but in the present condition of 
home prosperity it may be relegated to the background. 

* * * 

— New bond issues have reached such a mark that the 
January record has been only once surpassed in our his- 
tor\ . The monthly total has reached approximately $520,- 
000,000 ami the last week shows that the pace i-. l>emu 
maintained. Among the n itable issues of the immediate 
future is one of $5,000,000 which will be placed in New York 
by the Canadian National Railroads. This is interesting as 
showing the general tendency of United States finance to 
dominate Canadian economic life. A fen years ago and that 

ftsue would have been confined to London, 

* * * 

— \ special stockholders' meeting to lie held April 3rd 
to authorize an increase of $50,000,000 in the fund debt of 
the Union ( hi Company of California, is an interesting item 
showing progress. Last week the company offered a $10,- 

■30,000 issue of Union < >il through a nation-wide syndicate 
leaded by Dillon Read X ( o. $2,500,000 of the proposed 

Bcrease is represented in this issue and the balance of the 
proposed fund debt is open for future financing. The $10,- 
000,000 issued last week covers all that is required for financ- 
ing and the officers of the corporation say that the proposed 
increase will settle finances for some years to come. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

(LATELY THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY) 

SAVINGS COMMFpri.i 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. COMMERCIAL 

One of the Oldest Banksln California, 

the Assets of which have never been Increased 

by mergers orconsollda tion s with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1924 

Assets $96,917,170.69 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,000,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 461,746.52 

PARK°PR FSimn RR i-Xr-ii Misslott and 21st Str «» 

5^ R A£ R Fli, D -.f° BRAN CH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

WBCx HT n| T r R »? E Io B ^ A s'i CH Hai S!" and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave, end Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (4^) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid Up Capital $20,000,000 *20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL, BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued. CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES 
THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON. ENG.; NEW YORK- 
PORTLAND. ORE.; SEATTLE. "WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

San Francisco Office: 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
HRIICE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Asst. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 
Walter W. Derr, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douclas 2244 



THE HOME 

ItWUMANCt COMPANV 

NEW YORK 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



"The Largest Fire Insurance 
Company in America" 

Fire, Automobile, Windstorm. 
Tourists' Baggage Insurance 
: REASONABLE RATES 



W. W. HEALEY 
NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 
208 Crocker Building (Opposite Palace Hotel) San Francisco 
Phone Kearoy 391 



."Mayerle's Eyewater" 

fhir M yearn the mo«t popular Eye Tonic 
for rhlldren and adults... At drnBgUts ".c, 
by mall "Or. 

George Mayerle, Expert Optician, 960 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 






16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 7, 1925 



Bits of Unwritten History 

By Edward S. Spring 



CHAPTER XXII 
Investigate Before Investing 

THE question is often asked, whether the investor, 
or trader, in mining, oil and other stocks, that are 
features of San Francisco's financial market, is not now 
better protected against rascality, than in earlier times, be- 
fore the Blue Skv laws went into effect. Before giving a 
definite answer to this, it is pertinent to say, that if a person 
is determined to be dishonest, not all the Blue Sky laws 
in the world will prevent him. If he is a clever crook, he 
will find a means to beat the law. despite all its safe-guards. 
If caught, the law will try to punish him, but, if he has 
money and employs a smart lawyer, he is likely to win his 
fight. The only real protection the investor has, in this 
matter, is good' character. He has only one simple thing 
t0 do — to go to any responsible bank and ask who and what 
the men are, that manage the corporation whose shares he 
is about to buy. If it is a good bank, it will gladly give him 
this information. In fact, all the leading banks of San 
Francisco have departments that are expressly devoted to 
this service. Let him, then, act accordingly. 

Coming back to the main question, an experience of 
fifty-one "years of close association with San Francisco's 
financial market, convinces the writer, that, while the inves- 
tor, or trader, in the various classes of stocks and securities, 
is assumed to be better protected against rascality, there 
is now much more crookedness, in proportion to the amount 
of business done, than there was in the 70's, 80's and 90's. 
In proof of this, one has only to read the first page of his 
daily paper. The enforcement of the Blue Sky laws 
seems to be a good deal like the enforcement of prohibition, 
only on a smaller scale. The clever promotion crook and 
the bootlegger cannot be suppressed. 

The tremendous wave of oil stock speculation which 
swept over California and the country at large, in the late 
90's brought much crookedness into the situation and it 
was chiefly to check this, that the Blue Sky laws were 
framed in this State. In the excitement, swindlers secured, 
for a few dollars in cash, options to buy hundreds of thou- 
sands of acres of land, barren of oil, incorporated thousands 
of companies, each with millions of shares, which were 
listed, almost without question, on stock exchanges, and 
the shares were sold to the wildly excited public, at big 
prices, even before a drill or a piece of timber was put on 
the "property." Millions of dollars went into the pockets 
of the promoters and their agents. No work was ever done 
on these lands and the options to buy expired, without the 
owners receiving more than the few dollars given them at 
the start. 

After the oil craze had largely subsided, there came 
the great excitement over the rich mineral strikes in Tono- 
pah, Goldfield and other Southern Nevada camps, around 
1900, and many of the tricky methods of the oil crooks were 
here repeated, on an even bigger scale. Before that time, 
with the exception of companies operating in the Rockv 
Mountain districts, mining corporations rarely had as large 
a capitalization as 1.000,000 shares. But, when the Southern 
Nevada fields were in full sway and ever since, millions 
of shares became the rule. Between the oil and the mining 
swindles, the public has had a hard time. 

"But," say the many, who have been directly, or in- 
directly, benefited by oil in California and gold and silver 
in Southern Nevada, "See what these strikes and big ex- 
citements have done for the world at large. Look at the 



billions of dollars of newly created wealth and the vast 
impetus given to all the other industries and to the rise in 
property values and the employment of labor, despite the 
crookedness, which is more than offset by the good that 
has been done." 

This is indeed true. Out of evil came great good and 
there also comes this lesson — Investigate, before investing. 
Don't take the "say-so" of the man in the street, or even 
the word of a good friend, who "means all right," but go 
to the information desk of any leading bank and ask what 
they think and know. They will gladly tell you and, 
ninety-nine times out of a hundred, it will be safe to follow 
their advice. 

"Dissatisfied Stockholders" 

In the old days, when anything went radically wrong in 
the affairs of a company and, especially, when there was a 
bad collapse in the price of its stock, one or more of the 
victims, who were badly hit, would advertise a call for a 
meeting of "dissatisfied stockholders." At such a meeting, 
there was much fiery talk and resolutions were passed 
condemning the management and a committee would be 
appointed to take legal action against them and that was 
about all that ever came of a majority of such meetings. 
The writer recalls one notable meeting of this character, 
that of the dissatisfied stockholders of the Day Mining 
Company (formerly named the Jack Rabbit) of Eastern 
Nevada. The proprietor of an evening paper of which the 
writer was then financial editor and the chief manipulator 
of the Day, were for many years at "loggerheads" and when 
the proprietor learned that some red hot resolutions against 
the mining man had been passed at the meeting, he said to 
the writer "Print them and give him Jessie." 

So, the writer printed the resolutions and gave him 
"Jessie," besides. The result was a libel suit for $50,000 
against the evening paper and its owner. "Never mind," 
said the latter — "Give him another whaling." This order 
was obeyed and a second suit for $50,000 resulted. These 
suits were kept alive in the court for several years and then 
came to trial before a jury. It was a hard fight. The plain- 
tiff was awarded $1.00 damages and had to bear all the costs 
of the suit amounting to several hundred dollars. While 
preparing for this case, the writer was greatly assisted 
by a young clerk who was studying law in the office of 
David McClure. He was of massive build and had a great 
head of thick, tawny hair. Poring over the law books and 
digging out decisions, he would spend whole nights in the 
office. Everybody said he was a fool, to work so hard. 
But he was storing that big head with law, all the time and 
it afterwards paid him well, for he was Garrett W. Mc- 
Enerney. 

(To be continued) 



Established 28 Years 



EXTRA HAIR 
COVER THE BOB 



EVENING 



FOR 

WEAR 



NOW BEING SHOWN AT 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

815 Clement Street San Francisco 360 Geary Street 

2331 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley 
MR. AND MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 



GANTNER & MAISON 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
-771 to 777 Valencia Street, Bet. 18th and 19th Sts., 
San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



Chapel- 



February 7, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



Wheat and Chaff 

By Nathaniel Anderson 




Nathaniel Anderson 

WHAT would you do if you owed 
$304,840,332,912,685.16? Would 
you work to pay it to the last sixteen 
cents, 'till the honest sap on your 
brow from the red pumping of your 
breast failed to distill ? We admit some 
trifling' to have put the reader in such 
a predicament even hypothetically. 
But poor George Jones of this state 
had these figures against him when he, 
naturally, prepared to go into bank- 
ruptcy. His assets, according to the 
law journal that reported his case, 
were "less than the percentage of ben- 
zoate of soda in strawberry jam." The 
man who had a superior court judg- 
ment against Junes kindly remarked 
that "The first trillion dollars is the 
hardest." 

Jones gave Henry H. Stuart a 
promissory note for a loan of $100, 
with compound interest at 10 per cent 
a month. Then Jones went to Kan- 
sas to raise mules. After twenty-five 
years and ten months he returned. Stuart 
said the note was not outlawed, be- 
cause Jones had been out of the state. 
So he sued. 

The judge who rendered judgment 
against Jones said there was nothing 
else to do. Now, Stuart to quote again. 
"can pay all the war debts, relieve all 
the famines, and buy a new flivver — ii 

Cones pays." 

* * * 

It was a bold nude I saw on sale in 
.i salvage Store of a religious institu- 
tion. She was no effigy of a Rapper, 
and she showed no temptations for 
peeks at knees or shoulders, She was 
made to stare at. on cardboard. I 
could have taken her home tor seventy- 
live cents. I knew that gazing on a 
mixture of habiliment and form about 



ten cents would be stuck in the corner 
of the picture, hut as it was the high 
cost of art came too high for me, and 
I turned and left her cold. 
* * * 

The well-fed (and benevolent-look- 
ing) man pictured herewith is so because 
he never goes hungry, if he can help 
it. Many of his neighbors and others 
generally do not interrupt their daily 
tasks to sit down to substance, and 
when they do pause, it is only to take 
what food that can be gathered with a 
snatch or two. Well, he will out-live 
those chaps, and girls. He is always 
ready for his duty to himself at meal 
time, which means for him, as it should 
with everybody else, when he is hun- 
gry. The call of nature does not fail 
to come properly in the course of the 
day because it knows 'tis never dis- 
obeyed. When one has a nature that 
works like this, it will often speak 
forth in the foodless desert or the dis- 
trict of the city at the mercy of count- 
less restaurants, every one of whose 
cuisine is carefully planned for the 
purposes of indigestion. The man of 
the cut has travelled enough to know 
a good or bad restaurant on sight, and 
on an occasion this week, being in 
want, he looked at many, and kept 
moving. The mixed odours of hog 
grease and artificial flavours drove him 
onward. Rather than break his rule 
and pass the time of the inner de- 
mand, he forced himself half through 
the doorway near the end of his pres- 
ent whereabouts. The grease sizzled 
in loud threats, a woman in a soiled 
sweater and long turban of like expres- 
sion appeared. He backed out again. 
The woman followed to the door and 
called, "Its awdl right; common in." 
Perhaps it was. There was something 
behind that pretty Irish accent and 
face. 

To be safe, though, 1 asked for an 
oyster stew. This month has an R 
in it. — 1 got them fried, in lard. I gave 
up. fell to watching the woman, listen- 
ing to her talk, which was with every- 
body in a jolly way. "But why that 
get-up?" I thought. The long coat- 
like sweater was a style all her own. 
And the turban? It interested me be- 
cause of its similarity in shape to the 
headdress of the fisherwomen of Brit- 
tany I opined in a rather uncertain 
manner that over the black hair of 
this Irish woman 1 saw an expression 
of the Gaelic kinship that delvers in 
history discover between the Britons and 
her own race. It has been told to me that 
when these two peoples meet at sea 
they often speak and understand each 
other in the old Gaelic tongue. 

The daughter of Ireland was care- 
less in dress hut happy. She was easy 
in her work and free spirited. If she 
could stand that bare, dark place, and 
the grease, and blithely move back and 
forth while she chatted, on Sundays 



without question putting on just as 
queer a rig as her present one, cleaner 
of course, then she had worked out 
good harmony for herself. So I shook 
the lard off my oysters, drank the 
strange brand of coffee, departing with 
the thought that it was just as well 
that she struggled with no clothes 
complex. 




• JI.ID <•<■ 



N. W. CORNER 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 

Wilson Bros. Co. 

Inrnrpcirfltrd 

I8M-M MARKET STREET 

lift. I'm nk Mn and Goueh 

Telephone I'nrk 271 



AWI IL MEETING 

The Joshua Hendy Iron Works 

The regular annual meeting of th»- stock- 
holders of The Joshua Hendy Iron Works will 
he held at the office of the corporation. No. IS 
Fremont Street, San Francisco. California, oil 

Tuesday, the lnth day of February, 1926, at 

the hour of 10 o'clock a. m„ for the purpose 
of electing ■ Board of Dtrecl ve for 

the ensuing year, and the transaction <if such 
oilier business as may come before the meet- 
ing. CHAS. C. GARDNER, 

Secretary. 
Office: 75 Fremont Street. 
San Francisco. Calif. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 7, 1925 



JpwT?iBi£ 



By KEM 

"Poetry is like shot silk with many glancing colors, and 
every reader must find his own interpretation according to 
his ability and according to his sympathy with the poet." 

S. G. Dunn, in "Tennyson." 

Compa lionable Poems and other works, by Edmund 
Vance Cooke, are in demand at the Book Shops more than 
usual since the author is in our midst, having given an 
Author's Reading in the Paul Elder Gallery last Satur- 
day afternoon to a very appreciative audience. William 
Lyon Phelps pronounces Mr. Cooke the legitimate successor 
to James Whitcomb Riley. S. G. Dunn tells us "we cannot 
all appreciate the same things or the same poets. Tem- 
perament decides our friendships in living society; it is to 
temperament that we must look for the basis of our literary 
predilections." But Edmund Vance Cooke appeals to many 
for here is a poet the children love, and men like Woodrow 
Wilson and Newton D. Baker find that he gives them vital 
things "to ease off the days' work" ; the Saturday Evening 
Post tells us his poems "take you by the shoulder without 
an introduction. They talk plainly about every day things 
in the every day life of the every day man, and they don't 
mince it," as a verse from his "Throbs" proves to us : 

"And so you are famous, author man? 
You're out of the ranks of the also-ran 
And you're known from Beersheba back to Dan. 
Well, judging the future by all the past, 
I can tell you whether your work will last. 
O, you may be witty, you may be wise ; 
You may have captured the Noble prize. 
But measure for measure and ounce for ounce, 
Nothing else but the heart-throb counts." 
It is the human touch all through the poems that promise 
Edmund Vance Cooke to be one of the poets who will live 
to good purpose. Like Burns, he is a personality, "and a 
personality is a person plus force." Like Burns he is a 
poet of the hearthstone." And as a writer who modestly 
signs himself "J. M.," tells us "Amid the rush of modern 
living and its temptations, a strong corrective is this — to 
be brought face to face with the eternal things in the quiet 
of the home." Burns sings : 

"To make a happy fireside clime 
To weans and wife, 
That's the true pathos and sublime 
Of human life." 
and Cooke gives us many a home-scene such as — 
"Never thought much of the social fluff; 
Never cared much for the climber stuff. 
Don't think the editors ever see 
Any society news in me. 
As for "At Homes" and stand-up teas, 
They give me a wobble around the knees. 
Nobody ever heard me cry 
Because the Four Hundred passed me by. 
But jimminy whizz! how I do grin 
When a good, old friend 

drops 

in." 
Also as Burns' poems had a national influence, so will 
such poems as Mr. Cooke's "High Cost of Living," "Joy 
and Your Job," "Telling the Boss," speed us on our way 
to better things. There are many notable poets found 
on the pages of literature, but in the United States we are 
told "there are more literary clubs, reading clubs, clans and 



what not, founded in the name of Robert Burns and devoted 
to the study and enjoyment of his work, than are dedicated 
to the memory of any other author, not even excluding 
Shakespeare and Robert Browning." So it is the poet of 
the commonplace themes with "the touch of nature's fire," 
who makes his country's songs and lives on in the hearts of 
men to lasting fame. 

Companionable Poems, published by McClurg; $1.50. 

Katherine Eggleston, writer of many short stories and 
serials, many of which have appeared in pictures, gave a 
luncheon Monday, in honor of Edmund Vance Cooke and 
Nancy Buckley. Miss Buckley is to leave shortly for a 
prolonged trip abroad. The guests invited to meet the 
"successor of James Whitcomb Riley," and San Fran- 
cisco's sweet lyric singer were all women actively engaged 
in writing. May Robson, famous actress and playwright ; 
Anita Day Hubbard of the Bulletin, Miss Whitmore of 
the Examiner, and Mrs. Havens were among those present. 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

^PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL, ELDER'S LIBRARY 

239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



Make yourself at home at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tillmann Place, at 241 Grant Ave. 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Rare Books — First Editions — Fine Bindings 

Importations from Zachnsdorf, Root, Morrell, etc., of London 

Commissions in London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

Phone Kearny 5816 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS, FLUMES, 

PENSTOCKS, GASHOLDERS, SMOKE STACKS, ETC. 

Snn Francisco, Calif. Lou Angeles, Calif. 

444 Market St. 5717 Santa Fe Avenue 



Be Photographed This Year on Your Birthday 






STUDIOS IN ALL 

PRINCIPAL CITIES OF 

CALIFORNIA 



Oaklnnd 

408 l lili Street 

Son Francisco 

41 Grant Avenue 



St. Mary's Academy 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 



For particulars address 
SISTER SUPERIOR 



Select Boarding and Day School Under the 
Direction of the Sisters of St. Dominic 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Suit* Presned By Hnnd Only — Suit* Called For nnd Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

PARISIAN DYEING AND CLEANING 
521 Pofit Street San FrancUco 

In Virginia Hotel Phone Frnnklln 2510 




'the better it gets- 




GEO. W. CASWELL 



Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 



1,800,000 cups were nerved at the Pnn- 
aiiia Pacific International Exposition 



Have Your Car 

DUCO 

ENAMELED 

Our System Will Give a 
Permanent Luster 

Does Not Fade Nor Crack 
This We Guarantee 

See Our Demonstration Car 

Everluster Auto Enameling Co. 
946 Bush Street Franklin 2775 



(Continued o Page 1 8 1 

During the period Eor the renewal of 
automobile licenses Section 51, sub- 
division 2 of the California Vehicle 
Act will be disregarded, according to 
a bulletin received by the National 
Automobile Club from W. II. Marsh, 
Chief, Division of Motor Vehicles. 
This sub-division refers to display of 
the Certificate of Registration in the 
driver's compartment of the automobile. 
This ruling is made as it is necessary to 
submit the white certificate i. e. the Cer- 
tificate of Registration to the Motor 
Vehicle Department in order to obtain 
1925 license. 

* * * 

Securing Automobile Registration 
For 1925 

This division has requested motor- 
ists to submit both the white certifi- 
cate of registration and the pink cer- 
tificate of ownership together with the 
necessary fee. 

If the motorist has lost his white cer- 
tificate, registration will be made on 
the pink certificate, provided it is legi- 
ble and will make immediate delivery 
of plates. 

If the white certificate only is sub- 
mitted plates will not be delivered im- 
mediately. Plates will be given only 
after the white certificate has been 
verified with the records which requires 
some time since it is expected that 
more than 1.400,000 registrations will 
be issued this year. 

Motorists who submit both certifi- 
cates will be given first consideration. 
Persons not legal owners of their cars 
arc advised to get in touch with their 
legal owners who will make the neces- 
sary transactions for them. It is much 
better for all concerned to submit both 
certificates. 

Registrations opened February 2nd 
at all branch offices of the division of 
motor vehicles and all branch offices 
of the automobile clubs. Motorists 
who cannot appear in person may mail 
their certificates and fee to Sacramento 
and receive the same attention. The 
fee i- the same as last year. 

* * * 

It is estimated that tne pressure at 
the center of the earth is between 4,000 
and 10,000 tons to the square inch. 

It is estimated that as much as 200 
pounds of blood may be sucked from 
on. cow in a single season by cattle 
ticks. 

* * * 

In Serbia and Bulgaria the girl who 
is not betrothed by her sixteenth birth- 
day is regarded a* hopelessly ineligi- 
ble. 

* * * 

\ntioch. in the fourth century, is 
believed to have been the first city to 
make any attempt to light it- streets at 
night. 











Tel. Prospect 6979 




H.& S. 

GARAGE 


639 Turk Street 
San Francisco, Calif. 


The above firm means lots to the auto- 
mobile owners. For a small monthly- 
payment they take all your automo- 
bile worries away from you. Your car 
is kept in first-class mechanical condi- 
tion. It's greased and oiled. It's towed 
in San Francisco free of charge. Re- 
placement of parts up to $50 free, in 
case of damage by collision. 10 per 
cent discount on oils and greases and 
gasoline. Automobiles washed for 
$1.50. And other features. 

Investigate, or phone for 
representative 




PIONEER 



The 
Name J 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
_ — ™ — printer or sta- 

asBjgBi aaiar v™*™^™ 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1S55 
41 First Street, San Francisco 



Mail Advertising 
Specialists 

ACCURATE AND PROMPT 
SERVICE 

Andrews-Breeding Company 

Sutler 6224 

Room 801 Gillette Building 

830 MARKET STREET 

SAN ER\MlSCO 



[COOKS] 



&. 



^w' 



&, 



TICKETS ISSUED 

To All 

PARTS OF THE WORLD 

INCLUSIVE INDEPENDENT TOURS 
ITINERARIES FURNISHED 

CRUISES SUPREME 

MEDITERRANEAN 
Leaving New York January 24, 1925 

ROUND THE WORLD 
Leaving New York January 22, 1925 

Write for Booklets 



128 Sutter Street 



San Francisco 



Why You 
Should Give 



and help fill up the Community Chest is told in a page 
of appealing pictures in Sunday's rotagravure section; 
there is also a page of beautiful art photography show- 
ing eight attractive views taken at the 



University 
of California 



Many notables are pictured in "America Illustrated" and 
"In Other Lands"; there are unique pictures of "Feath- 
ers, Fish and Fur"; some "Fun in Fashions" and a 
delightful front page, the "Dance of the Nymphs." 
Don't miss the 



Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 



Golden Gate Ferry Company 



"1 



FOOT 


OF HYDE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 




WINTER SCHEDULE 






TIME TABLE 






EFFECTIVE OCTOBER 15, 1924 




Leave 


Sausalito 


Leave San 


Francisco 


A.M. 


P.M. 


(Hyde Street) 


6:00 


12:30 


A.M. 


P.M. 


6:30 


1:00 


6:30 


12:30 


7.00 


1:30 


7:00 


1:00 


7:30 


2:00 


7:30 


1:30 


8:00 


3:00 


8:00 


2:00 


8:30 


4:00 


8:30 


2:30 


9:00 


4:30 


9:00 


3:30 


9:30 


5:00 


9:30 


4:30 


10:00 


5:30 


10:00 


5:00 


10:30 


6:00 


10:30 


5:30 


11:00 


6:30 


11:00 


6:00 


11:30 


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6:30 


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8:0( 




7:30 




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8:00 




9:00 




8:30 




9:30 




9:00 




10:30 




9:30 




11:30 




10:00 
11:00 
12:00 


Special Service When 


Traffic Requirements 




Make Necessary. 




Golden Gate Ferry Company 






m m ■_» 

b m m< m m 



BUY IT TODAY! 

"CHECKER" STOCK 

is 



"PLUS" STOCK 



WHY? 



Because in buying it at $10 a share 
you get a dividend-paying investment, 
with unlimited possibilities for advancement in price, 
and part-ownership in a successful going business with 
wonderful development still ahead of it. You cannot 
afford to pass up this opportunity to obtain some stock 
in CHECKER CAB CO. of San Francisco. The original 
$10 shares in a similar Eastern concern are worth $800 
today. ACT NOW. Without obligation send today for 
all information or mail check for your shares — orders 
accepted for one or more. We want as many boosters 
as possible. 



"Ride in 
Your Own 
Cab 
and Pay 
Yourself 
a Profit" 

■ in m m m i 

im m m m m 



.1. \. iiai.OI. President 

Checker Cab Co. 

104s California St.. San Francisco. 

; ] I am interested. Please send full 

detai Is. 
I ] Please reserve for me shares 

of stock al $10 a share. 

Name 

Address _ 

N.iI-2-7-25 

s v ar ■ ■ b v ■. ■ 
■ m k m k ■ b ■ k 



i 






JtJT AU TO SHOW -February 21st to ^tb. 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856 




PRICE 10 CENTS 
SAN FRANCISCO 



California Advertiser 



$5.00 PER YEAR 



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 192 










KOHLER & CHASE 

Established 1850 
THE AMPICO IN THE 

KNABE $1850 and Up 

FISCHER $1050 and Up 

FRANKLIN $845 and Up 

it ■ TERMS = 



I)®!s3 



Why Your Friends Own The AMPICO 

YOUR friends have become the possessors of the Ampico 
because they, like you and every one, love music. It is 
because they have found that a piano or player piano 
does not fill the demand for music in their homes. Even 
though there might have been an accomplished pianist in the 
family he cannot always be commanded to play as the 
Ampico can, nor is he always willing and ready, with music 
of all kinds, as the Ampico is. 

For those long weeks when Nature turns her austere side 
toward us and we feel the chill of her change of mood and 
withdraw to the shelter of home and cluster about the fire- 
side, there is a certain lure to enchant us and carry us far on 
the road to happiness and that is Music. Well has Music 



been called the greatest of the Arts, beginning indeed where 
the others leave off for she vibrates in accord with them all 
and goes far beyond them all. 

She bears us to the Isles of Romance and takes us by the 
hand into moonlit gardens and we walk with her -by the 
blue sea and feel the fresh wind in our faces. She takes us 
gayly dressed to the Carnival. She recreates for us the 
strange sounds of the Orient. We stand by the cradle as the 
mother sings to her babe. We dance, we laugh, we sing and 
even weep with her who holds in her powerful grasp all our 
joys, all our emotions and plays on them as she will. 

Music in its effect on man has a greater power than any 
other single influence and a home in which music dwells is 
a real home. 

We would tell you how the Ampico brings this, the 
divinest of the Arts to dwell under your roof. The keen 
enjoyment that it brings may be obtained at a compara- 
tively small outlay. It costs very little more than the price 
of the recordings for its upkeep. It depreciates in value 
very slowly and will continue its usefulness for many years 
and during its lifetime will prove to be an unending source 
of pleasure. 

Creating as it does a musical atmosphere in the home and 
contributing to the joy of the entire family, it is difficult to 
estimate the return for the investment which the Ampico 
will bring. 



Sacramento 
Fresno 



KOHLER & CHASE 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

1850 — 75 Years in California — 1925 



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San Jose 




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EiUMIdtid July 20. 1U» 

SAN F£l^l«Co 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




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Vol. CVI 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1925 



No. 7 



— Last Wednesday morning we thought the Seven Day 
Adventists had just made a mistake in the date. 



— Collins can be exhibited as the only living cave man 
in the U. S. A. when he comes out (?). 



— Russia has just placed a considerable amount of orders 
for American dyes. We suppose the first color they will 

want is red. 

* * * 

— An English wit says that the most dangerous sign of. 
the times is that we no longer even believe that we are 

going to the dogs. 

* * * 

Apropos, a clever old lady once said to us : "The country 
has been going to the dogs ever since I can remember, but 
it hasn't got there yet." 

— "True modesty is a quality of lofty souls, for they have 
the most thorough knowledge of the limitations of their 
capacities." So says Luis H. Debayle. 

* * * 

— And again he says: "The error in respect of equality 
consists in wishing to generalize or to apply to everything 
the principle of Christian and democratic equality. If it 
were possible to do so, you would find no strength, merit, 
elevation, genius, holiness or heroism." 



— This grand old city! Only a few moments after the 
terrific storm last Wednesday, the fresh wind blew the 
streets clean and dry, and we could sally forth without 
wetting a toe. Where else would you find the weather 
doing Ihe rightful labor of the Board of Public Works so 

nicely? 

* * # 

— "Fifty times stronger in its power to kill disease germs 
than carbolic acid." is what the scientists say of llexylre- 
sorcinol, the new kidney cure. Well, personally we would 
rather let the bad little microbes play around a bit, than 
swallow such energetic stuff, with that name an' every- 
thing. 

* * * 

— Funny old world! Humans will go to all sorts of 
labor and expense to rescue a man imprisoned in a cave; 
newspapers will devote front pages to the case every day : 
the prisoner will eventually become an international figure. 
the most talked of man on earth for the time being, then 
whole regiments at another time, can be slaughtered, and 
the world applauds. Funny old world! 



—The French can pay their debts, is the opinion of the 
British press. The Britons hold the view that French citi- 
zens, head for head, are as prosperous as their own, probably 
more prosperous, and as well able to bear equal taxation. 
During the war, English and American money was spent in 
France at a prodigious rate, while the recovery of Alsace- 
Lorraine — incomparably better equipped and economically 
more valuable than in 1871 — was a splendid enlargement of 
the sources of national wealth. French trade flourishes to a 
corresponding degree. 



— This Autumn and Winter the horse seems to have come 
into his own. We have been to three wonderful horse 
shows lately, and found that satiny horse flesh, arching 
necks, quivering nostrils are an appealing sight, a sight that 
all true Californians love, and one that we should see 
oftener. Racing, "the sport of kings" and horse shows are 
synonymous with the soil of this State, and with the 
romance and love of pleasure that has made California fa- 
mous ; and we might add, amber wines and sparkling ruby 
Burgandy. Pleasure is our birth-right, and long-haired re- 
formers who would cut us off from these, and similar enjoy- 
ments, should be "shot at sun-rise." 



— -"Like Prussianism in the pre-war Europe, like Bol- 
shevism in Russia, and like revolutionary militarism in 
Spain, Fascism is tainted with a fundamental disloyalty to 
the cause of joint human action. Signor Mussolini's pres- 
ent political shifts, his successive fakings of the electoral 
system, his attempt to bribe the Vatican into complaisance 
by outlawing Freemansonry, his little rushes to and fro be- 
tween wild extremcism and relative moderation — all these 
are not mere unaccountable freak symptoms; thev express 
the natural bewilderment of a ruler who, like a murderer in 
private life, has destroyed his own capacity for normal in- 
tercourse with his fellows." — Manchester Guardian. 



— Yellow daffodils, and acacia and narcissus, and all the 
garden and hot-house blossoms that breathe the spring 
message nodding in a friendly way from the flower ven- 
dor-' stalls on down town corners. Dainty lilies of the 
valley, and waxen gardenias and strange orchids and great 
clusters of purple violets in the florists' windows. Flowers ! 
Their name is legion in this blessed land of our's. But of 
all the blooms that attract and distract the eye. none appeal 
to me like the lowly little golden buttercup — for every 
gleaming petal speaks of the hills of our childhood ; flower- 
clad hills, with purling streams in every canyon, and delicate 
fronds of maiden hair fern drenched with April rain. Would 
those hills and fields mean as much to us now. Could we 
go hack to them? We wonder! 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 14, 1925 




We all remember more or 
The Poetry of the Malemute less of Browning's poem 

"How They Brought the 
Good News from Ghent to Aix", and we have more or less 
remembrance again of the not so effective piece of work 
of Longfellow in which he tries to describe the ride of 
Paul Revere. These are two classical instances of the fate- 
ful messenger and answer, in our educational system, to 
the odes with which the Greeks celebrated the death of the 
messenger who carried the news of Marathon. In the 
former of the poems, Browning compliments the horse and 
all the interest centers round the animal whose shoul- 
ders cleave the mists as a rough river makes its way to the 
sea. Longfellow, curiously enough, takes no note of the 
horse who was charged with such a fateful task. His hoofs 
beating on the road but tell of the names of the villages 
through which he passes. This last week we have had one 
of the most, if not the most, dramatic incidents of the sort, 
in the carrying by the dog teams of the necessary serum to 
Nome. The contrast between the modernity of the medi- 
cal freight and the primitive method of transportation is 
obvious. It will be noted, too, that recourse was had to the 
dogs, only after the most modern and approved methods 
had failed in the face of the elements. In this case the cold 
was from twenty to fifty degrees below zero. The wonder- 
ful animals pulled through and carried their precious 
freight in record time. What is the moral? Only this, 
perhaps, that when the most elaborate and technical de- 
vices of man fail to perform that for which they were in- 
tended, when the powers of nature laugh at the puny ma- 
chinery with which man dares to combat them, even then 
the blood and sinew with which man and beast have always 
combated nature, will lie found ready for the task again. 



Under that heading the last num- 
"Volstead Volunteer" ber of "Judge" has a very excel- 
lent short article on the prohibition 
question. The editor points out that five years ago there 
was an opportunity for very rich people to fill their cellars 
with enough liquor to last them their life time. They ap- 
proved of the prohibition amendment and of the Volstead 
Act, for they knew that the working people would, as a 
rule, be unable to get any liquor and the money formerly 
"spent in the spiritual satisfactions of a Saturday night 
souse" would go "into instalments on sedans, radios and 
vacuum cleaners". They guessed pretty correctly there, 
and the markets have been increased and developed in 
these respects. "Judge" goes on to a very wise conclusion 
as follows : 

"Yet some day they will have to choose between the 
two — between order and security with personal liberty, 
and lawlessness and insecurity with prohibition. The 
growing irritation which begins to alarm them is not 
going to yield to the moralizing of rich gentlemen, with 
or without pre-war cellars, to whom prohibition is all 
profit and no deprivation. 

"They forget, perhaps, that from time immemorial 
booze has been society's natural lubricant. It has con- 
soled the have-nots for the humbleness of their lot, the 
hewers of wood for the drudgery of their toil, the mil- 
lions of small souls for the meanness of their lives. It 
has been the antidote for envy. 

"Society will get it somehow, or burn out its bear- 
ings. But the chances are much greater that it will 
sret it." 



The Mayor has come out 
The Mayor's Proclamation with what the papers call a 

"proclamation" which is a 
very high sounding title in a democratic community. Not 
that the Mayor ever called it that, for he is a very sensible 
person and does not indulge in needless rhetoric, that is to 
say, he does not blow the bass horn except when the needs of 
the orchestra seem to call for it. And yet the Mayor in 
that proclamation comes perilously near the borderland 
of the ridiculous in the over-sentimentality of his admirable 
appeal. We are all as one with the Community Chest and 
there is no doubt at all about the value of the institution 
and the statesmanlike way in which the funds are adminis- 
tered. However, the Mayor says : "The coming ten days 
of the Community Chest appeal are days of consecration 
of San Francisco in the loftiest purposes of humanity." This 
is just the sort of language that we heard so often during 
the war and which, by reason of the bad use which was 
made of it, has lost a great deal of its fire and authority. 
They were always "consecrating" us to something, were 
those propagandists and four-minute men and when we 
were sufficiently "consecrated", somebody landed on us to 
the extent of millions and even billions in patriotic profi- 
teering. It is the memory of those days that makes us 
feel prickly skins when we read such a statement as that 
which we have quoted. Besides, it is out of keeping with 
the general tone of the Mayor's address, which is other- 
wise admirable. For example, what could be better than 
the following: "But it is necessary that a greater sum be 
raised this year than before, and, as Mayor, I ask that all 
who can give, do so, and that, wherever possible, contribu- 
tions be increased over those of last year." To that very 
sensible and enlightened request we modestly add our own 
approval and suggest to our readers that they do all within 
their power to aid and establish the Community Chest, 
which is a very beneficent factor in our city life. 



Little has been said in the 
The Open Shop Movement press of late on the Open 

Shop Movement, which had 
so much weight and power only a year or two ago. This 
may be because the matter has already been well settled 
and the institution is now so well established that any dis- 
cussion of it is rather superfluous. The "Minnesota 
Banker", however, for the month of December, takes up 
this question very pointedly and makes several good sug- 
gestions which could be carried out here, with markedly 
notable results. For example, it points out that "the open 
shop movement is deemed by its proponents as the prime 
means of bringing about lowered labor costs and with them 
increased production." It is asserted that when such a 
gigantic force as the Bethlehem Steel Company openly 
announces its aid for this movement to the extent of refus- 
ing to sell its products to manufacturers not favoring the 
open shop idea, it is evident that the open shop movement 
is obtaining a great momentum. However, the Banker says 
with a great amount of truth that the movement cannot be 
considered as really making sure headway unless it is able 
to get conservative labor to see it in the light of its own 
interests. The meat of the argument lies in the conclusion : 
"The open shop argument must therefore be addressed to 
the better sense and judgment of the conservative in or- 
ganized labor. He must be won over to the soundness of 
the proposition." Upon the conservative working man in 
the long run will depend the acceptance of the idea philo- 
sophically and in the right spirit. The acceptance by him 
of the doctrine in such a form will avoid the disruption of 
the system by the strike and lock-outs which radical labor 
organizations would produce. It therefore becomes a mat- 
ter of publicity of such a nature as to psychologically ap- 
peal to that conservative class of labor. Here is a task at 
once delicate and necessary ; but it is one which must be 
taken up speedily. 



February 14, 1925 



AXD CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



There is some advantage in 
Where Real Economy Lies having- lived a long time and 

a paper like the "News Let- 
ter" enjoys that advantage, if no other. This remark, which 
may appear to be entirely superfluous, is suggested by a 
condition of things in the federal government. On the ques- 
tion of economy, it is noteworthy that we have now a 
president who pays some attention to the expenditure of 
national money and who appears to have a very healthy 
dislike to political extravagance at the public expense. 
This is a new virtue in our presidents ; for, since the Civil 
War, at least, we have had none whose eye has been fixed 
with any great intentness upon the treasury cask at its 
spigot end. Now, the "News Letter" has repeatedly in- 
sisted over quite a period of years that politicians wasted 
public money by giving away large sums to incompetent 
employees and that the tendency of politicians is to reward 
their handy men at the expense of the community, no mat- 
ter at what cost to the public funds. Numerous cuts are 
being made in national expenditure, sometimes, perhaps, at 
the risk of diminishing efficiency ; for you can only reduce 
so far without trenching on the safety of administration. 
So, an acute observer at Washington reports that the gov- 
ernment is greatly "overmanned". It is overmanned by 
incompetent people who could not earn a living, any other 
way, and whose point of view is the essentially lazy one 
favored by governmental officials. The whole govern- 
mental system should be cleaned out. A fair day's work 
for a fair day's pay should be the motto in political as it 
is in commercial life ; in other words, politicians should 
have no jobs to give. Money is wasted right and left in 
silliness. Thus a week ago the first half of the current ses- 
sion of the legislature cost $39,755.40. There has been no 
appreciable attempt to grapple with this evil at Washing- 
ton, the evil of "overmanning", and there is no such attempt 
being made in our state. 



The papers are not saying much 
The Austrian Debacle about it, but it does certainly ap- 
pear as if Austria was done for 
and there was no possibility of pulling her through, in spite 
of the efforts of the League. As you may remember. Aus- 
tria was turned into a receivership with one, Zimmerman, 
as receiver. The amounts to be paid over were calculated 
and the money was to be collected and paid in. Now, they 
are at the end of their tether over there. The country does 
not recover, cannot recover, and hunger and misery are 
the ever developing portion for its inhabitants. If the firm 
cannot do the business, there is no use in sustaining it and 
that is the state of affairs with Austria. Austria before the 
war was a compact economic unit, with Vienna, the beauti- 
ful capital, resting securely on a back country which pro- 
duced all the essentials for civilized living. Inside this eco- 
nomic unit was a political lack of unity due to the com- 
posite nations which represented the Austrian Empire. De- 
feat in war broke up the political combination and now 
Vienna is practically Austria with no economic background 
and nothing to subsist upon. Nothing can save the country 
unless Austria can again become part of an economic unit. 
She might become part of a Danubian confederacy which 
would perhaps increase the power of the Slavic peoples tOO 
much. She might become German, which would be looked 
upon with distinct disapproval. She might finally become 

Italian, which would be a very curious termination of the 

age long tight between Austria and Italy. But the Italian 
solution, though very logical in the present condition of af- 
fairs, would so poke up the tires of wrath in the Balkans 
that war would lie practically inevitable and war over such 
a scarecrow as Austria is today would be almost ludi- 
crous. The League is in a quandary over Austria and we 
who look on can say "The League hath given, the League 
hath taken away." 



Well-loved Pioneer Passes 

On January 30th of this year, James Francis Dunne 
passed to the Great Beyond at his ranch at San Felipe, 

in the Santa Clara Valley. One of the largest stock holders 
and ranchers in the State, he was beloved by all with whom 
he came in contact, and when it is stated that his own ranch 
men were grief-stricken at his death, is it a commentary 
that needs very little elaboration. 

He was a great lover of animals, and his good work to- 
wards the improvement and betterment of conditions for 
stock in general, won him many a tribute from large land 
owners and stockmen all over the country. Mr. James 
Phelan who was a lifelong friend of Mr. Dunne's, said of 
him : "I believe that he was one of the best loved men in 
California." 

There were among the hundreds who attended his fun- 
eral services in San Jose, several nuns, who told of his many 
charities and kindnesses to their different institutions 
throughout his life, and these were only some of many who 
attested to his philanthropic activities. Members of the 
"Old Guard" of the State, the genial, whole-hearted, demo- 
cratic men are passing, and we must look to this new gener- 
ation to fill their places. 

Mr. Dunne leaves two daughters, Mrs. Joseph Rucker of 
this city, Mrs. Philip Hersey of Santa Barbara, and a cousin, 
Mr. Peter Dunne. His wife was Miss Viola Lowery. 

Capitalist Buys Interest in Hotels 

The president of the Cereal Products Refining Corpora- 
tion of San Francisco, Mr. J. P. Rettenmeyer, has acquired 
an interest in the D. M. Linnard, Inc. hotel properties, it 
was recently announced. The Linnard corporation con- 
trols and operates the Fairmont and Whitcomb Hotels 
here; the Huntington, Maryland, and Vista del Arroyo in 
Pasadena ; the Samarkand and El Canto in Santa Barbara ; 
the corporation will also operate the new Whitcomb hotel 
in Tacoma, Wash., when it is completed. 



An Awkward Situation 
There has been a suggestion that, owing to the exigencies 
of traffic, the Market Street Railroads should be allowed to 
use the outer tracks for some part of the busy time. This 
suggestion has been met by a storm of disapproval and ap- 
parent alarm on the part of a certain demagogic faction 
which takes upon itself the burden of upholding the municipal 
roads. We are all in favor of the municipal roads, for 
they are here to stay and there is no use to balk about it. 
But it is absurd that the municipality should be considered 
imperiled by a condition like that to which we have re- 
ferred, and that the flannel-mouthed agitators should have 
a chance to talk. The only real solution of the matter, at 
once dignified and economical, is the purchase by the city 
of the privately owned railroads at reasonable cost. Then 
the city would have all the tracks and control of the whole 
business. 



Call an Air Taxi! 
Well, can you feature this? After April 5th, we are told 
that we can call Graystone 400 and in ten minutes' time, 
"hop off" on our aerial journey anvwhere on the Pacific 
Coast ! And we can go at the rate of 100 miles an hour, and 
for the rate of 20 cents a passenger per mile, with two pas- 
sengers flying to the same destination! Can't you fo 
how popular this mode of travel is gong to be for honey- 
mooners? We will soon be reading something like this in 
the papers: "The happy couple will fly to Santa Barba 
Coronado on their honeymoon." Talk about turtle doves I 
And the Chief of this wonderful innovation which the en- 
terprising Checker Cab Company is going to instigate for 
the comfort and convenience of San Franciscans and Pacific 
Coast towns generally, is the famous Walter T. Yarney, and 
is the result of a consolidation between the airplane interests 
of Mr. Yarney and the Checker Cab Company. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 14, 1925 




>LEi4SURE$W4ND 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURES 

Tom Moore, 




By Katherine Schwartz 
Formerly of the "Chicago Tribune" 



New Columbia 

OLGA PETROYA opened at the New Columbia this 
week in another play which she has written, "The 
White Peacock." This play, while greatly different from 
"The Hurricane" recently seen here, is intensely inter- 
esting. 

In this, Mme. Petrova has taken for her theme, the 
new freedom of women, — their right to economic inde- 
pendence and to have interests and careers apart from that 
of their husbands. She has written a strong and convinc- 
ing drama, choosing old Seville in Spain as the place where 
it all occurs. 

The play is beautifully staged and it is acted superbly. 
Petrova, in the very unusual role she has created for her- 
self, is splendid. In her support, are the company who 
were seen with her in "The Hurricane," together with a 
few new people, — notably Mrs. Thomas Holding, who plays 
the discreetly unconventional countess. Lewis Willoughby, 
is the lover who comes into the life of Revette in such an 
unusual manner, and acquitted himself nobly in a somewhat 
difficult part. Joseph Granby, the picturesque bandit and 
killer does some admirable work in this play, — his scene in 
the third act with Petrova is intensely dramatic. 

Mme. Petrova is here for only a short time. Tlie second 
week of her engagement she will present " Hurricane" at 
the Wednesday and Saturday matinees. All students of the 
drama should make the opportunity of seeing this brilliant 
and talented actress in "The White Peacock" and "Hurri- 
cane." 



S. F. Symphony 

The eighth pair of symphony concerts at the Curran The- 
ater, afforded not only a novelty, but a distinct lesson in 
symphonic composition. 

The Academic Festival Overture by Brahms, while not 
one of Brahms' best works, is none the less educational and 
entertaining. The Three Jewish Poems by Ernest Bloch 
would deceive no one, so easy it is to discover the sadness 
and the wanderings of the Semetic Race. 

The Symphony in D Minor by Cesar Franck is a musical 
structure equalled by few, and surpassed by none. The 
Lento movement afforded our own harpist Kajetan Attl an 
opportunity to show how much we are indebted to the sym- 
phony organization for bringing such artists to the city. 



S. F. Symphony Auditorium 

The last of the popular concerts given at the Civic 
Auditorium was devoted to Wagner, and we are once 
more reminded of our great privilege in listening to Dr. 
Hertz read this brilliant man's scores. In spite of a stormv 
evening the auditorium was filled with those music lovers 
who wish to hear the better things. Not many years ago, 
it was the popular impression that Wagner's music was 
filled exclusively with such intricate harmony a< to baffle all 
except the the most pedagogic, but it is also filled with 
such beautiful melodies that a season of popular concerts 
can never be complete without an all-Wagner program. 

It is especially satisfying to hear such an artist of wide 
distinction and experience as Florence Easton in a program 
of this sort. What is the Metropolitan Opera Company's 
loss is San Francisco's gain. 



Loew's Warfield 

Milton Sills, who for many week's has apparently been 
in hiding as far as downtown Market Street theatres are 
concerned, will reappear again next week when he conies 
to Loew's Warfield. playing with Viola Dana in "As Man 
Desires." The salt tang of the South Seas is nicely inter- 
mingled with the mysticism of the Orient in this strange 
play adapted from Gene Wright's novel, "Pandora La 
Croix." Sills and the petite Viola occupy the center of 
interest throughout. Sills in this one begins as an army 
surgeon who flees for his life after becoming enmeshed in 
a murder scandal. Later he is found in the South Sea Isles 
as a swashbuckling captain of a dingy pearl fishing 
schooner. In this atmosphere Sills is always at his best. 



Curran 

The San Carlo Opera Company close their successful 
two weeks' engagement at the Curran tonight. 

Opening Monday night for a two weeks' engagement, 
Pauline Frederick will again present "The Lady" which 
created such a favorable impression here a short while ago. 
Under the capable direction of Lillian Albertson, this play 
is given a fine and unusually well done presentation, and in 
addition to the great pleasure of seeing Miss Frederick in 
the role of "Polly" again, she has surrounded herself with a 
fine cast, including such names as June Elvidge, George 
Barraua, Charles Coleman, Derek Glynne, Phillip Hubbard, 
Rose Dione, and many others. 



Orpheum 

Coming direct to San Francisco from New York, where 
he has been featured in "The Greenwich Village Follies." 
Ted Lewis, known as the "king" of syncopation, is bringing 
his entire aggregation of musicians, dancers, and singers 
to the Orpheum next week. Featured with him, is pretty 
Bobby Arnst. 

Another feature of the bill next week will be "A Dance 
Voyage" by Dexter and Anita Peters Wright, with the fa- 
mous Wright dancers who all hail from San Francisco. 
Leading the organization will be Helen Pachaud, well 
known in San Francisco, having been born and raised here. 

Others on the bill are Joe Weston and Grace Eline, mu- 
sical comedy stars in "Character Interpretations" ; Howards 
Spectacle, an animal act; Bowers, Walters and Crocker, 
known as "The Three Rubes" ; Eileen Van Viene and Rich- 
ard Ford in a delightful little skit called "Romance and 
Crinoline": "Senator" Ford, from Michigan with his de- 
lightful monologue ; Jean Boydell. a unique Pepologist and 
her own interpretation of songs. 



Alcazar 

The long run of the justly popular comedy, "Just Mar- 
ried" comes to a close tonight. 

Beginning tomorrow night, this company of popular 
players, headed by Henry Duffy, and dainty little Dale 
Winters, will be seen in that delightful comedy of George 
M. Cohan's "So This Is London." 

This comedy is one of the stage classics of the day, — it 
is filled with keen wit, and double-edged satire of the kind 
that one naturally expects from Cohan. 



February 14, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 



ALCAZAR 

O'Farrell nr. Powell 



Henry Dull > Flayers 

"So This Is 
London'" 



ALEXANDRIA 
18th and Geary 



Pictures 



CALIFORNIA 

4th and Market 



"A Lost Lady" 



CAMEO 
936 Market St. 



'Flaming Forties" 



CAPITOL 

64 Ellis St. 



"White Collars" 



BEATTY'S 
CASINO 
Ellis and Mason 



Pictures and 
Vaudeville 



CASTRO 



Pictures 



NEW 

COLUMBIA 
Eddy and Mason 



Olga Petrova 

"The 
White Peacock" 



CURRAN 

Geary, Nr. Mason 



Pauline Frederick 

"The Lady" 



GRANADA 
1066 Market St. 



D. W. Griffith's 

"Isn't Life 
Wonderful!" 



GOLDEN GATE 
G. G. Ave. and Taylor 



Vaudeville and 
Pictures 



HIPPODROME 



Vaudeville 



IMPERIAL 
1077 Market St. 



'The Golden Bed" 



LOEWS 
WARFIELD 

988 Market St. 



'As a Man Desires" 



METROPOLITAN 

2055 Union St. 



Pictures 



NEW FILLMORE 
NEW MISSION 



Pictures 



ORPHEUM 
O'Farrell and Powell 



Vaudeville 



Duffy will be seen in the role of an 
English nobleman Sir Percy Beau- 
champ, an entirely different character- 
ization from the other roles he has pre- 
viously appeared in here. 



PANTAGES 
Market at Mason 



Vaudeville 
Pictures 



PORTOLA 



Pictures 

PrnRrnnt t'bnnRTcd 
Dally 



ROYAL 

1529 Polk St. 



Pictures 



STRAND 

965 Market St. 



'Love Letters" 



WILKES 

< Formerly Geary 

Geary and Masoi 



■- } 

n t 



Kolb and Dill 

in 

"Politics" 



WIGWAM 



Pictures 



Strand 

This weeks' offering at the Strand, 
not only afforded an excellent oppor- 
tunity for Will King and his company, 
but brought back into the cast, in ad- 
dition to Alma Astor, another favorite 
of the old Will King days, — Clara La 
Velle, who was accorded an enthu- 
siastic welcome. 

Will Aubrey's popularity seems to 
increase each week ; this week he 
scores heavily with "My Best Girl." 
Hermie King and his men have a good 
musical offering, during which they 
employ some swift changes of dress 
and scenery. 

There is a surprise in store for the 
Will King "fans" next week. The name 
of the offering is "Love Letters" and 
it is said to be entirely different from 
anything this company have attempted 
so far. 



Golden Gate 

There is a great treat in store for 
Patrons of the Golden Gate next week 
— Joseph E. Howard's musical revue 
"The Toy Shop," with a company of 
twenty-five, are the headliners. 

In addition, there will be seen on the 
bill Mabel McCane, famous songster 
and dancer who is presenting this sea- 
son a new act, entitled "Life" written 
especially for her by Blanche Merrill. 

Frank Van Hoven. "the mad magi- 
cian" will also be on the bill. As a 
laugh provoker, Van Hoven is second 
to nunc. Willie Solar, a nut comedian 
in his riot of fun. "The Laugh Fac- 
tory" ; Dave Apollon and company ; 
Margie Clifton, complete the bill. 



Cameo 

( )f course you have read "Tennes- 
see's Partner?" That classic of Bret 
Hartes? Adventure, horse-back and 
a-foot, in the days of the early forties. 
i>n the Pioneer Trail, coming to Cali- 
fornia, that's the play coming today to 
the Cameo, with Harry Carey as the 
hero and Jacqueline Gadsdon as the 
heroine, only it has been re-christened 
"The Flaming Forties." Think of the 
wonderful possibilities of the costum- 
ing with "hi fashioned hoop-skirts for 
the women, no doubt, and high stocks 
for the men. tight trousers, and tall 
hats. But we'll bet Harry Carey won't 
wear a >tove pipe : you can be sure of 
that! And Elmer Harold, the "senti- 
mental fat hoy" will still be with us: 
with his really quite sweet, but rather 
thin voice, delighting lovers of old 
songs. 



Concerts 



Scottish Rite Hall 

Mondny F.vcnin»r. February lit. Mine. ClandlO 

Mnalo, Soprano, 

Friday Evening:. Februnry 20, Albert Spnlil- 
Iiik. Violinist. 



New Columbia Theater 



Sunday Afternoon, February 15 
Rachmaninoff. Pianist, 



2:30 o'clock. 



Curran Theater 

San Francisco Symphony, Sunday Afternoon, 
February 15, Louis PersinR'er, Violinist, 
and Wnldemnr Giese, Double Itnss. 

Friday Afternoon. February 20, 3 o'clock, 
Walter Ferncr, 'Cellist. 



Club Beaux Arts 

The Maynard Dixon exhibits at the 
Club Beaux Arts, 116 Maiden Lane, 
closed last week. Five canvases and 
several drawings were sold. Instead of 
the "Open House" as usual, on Mon- 
day evening, Feb. 23rd, there will be 
a lecture on Chilean Art, by Marcos 
Barcia Huidoboro, the Consul to Chili, 
which will be illustrated. Members of 
the different Consulates in San Fran- 
cisco, will be invited as guests of the 
Club. 

The opening of Ralph Stackpole's 
exhibit of paintings will take place on 
Feb. 25th. 



Wilkes Theatre 

Kolb and Dill and their great laugh 
show. "Politics" are in their last weeks 
at the Wilkes theatre. The sixth week 
of the engagement begins next Monday 
night. Musical comedy is the forte of 
these two funsters and they are there- 
fore at their best this year as they sing 
and dance and engage in a tirade of 
mutilated language to the great delight 
of their admirers. Surrounded by a 
clever aggregation of players and a chorus 
mposed of girl soloists they are pre- 
senting one of the most satisfying offer- 
ings in which they have ever been seen. 



& <t-y° u p a y no ™ ie> /fy.# 

BESTFLOWE^" 




TheVbtoe o/« Thousand Oaidens' 

224-226 Giant Ave. Tel. Kearny 4975 




HARRY DIXON 

INTERPRETS 

YOUR IDEAS 

IX .METAL 



241 GRANT AVE. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 14, 1925 





ocieTy 



^H,|^!> 




St. Valentine's Day 

HEARTS are trumps today. Not in a casual card con- 
test, but in the permanent race of romance. For this 
is February Fourteenth, St. Valentine's Day. 

Although the custom of sending sentimental missives, 
which we call "valentines", is ages and ages old, St. Valen- 
tine keeps the heart of humankind perpetually young, by 
pouring over them little drops of tenderness, seasoned with 
thoughts. 

According to an old biography, St. Valentine was be- 
headed in Rome on a certain Fourteenth of February dur- 
ing the reign of Claudius. One legend tells us that "Birds 
began to couple on that day, hence it was that young per- 
sons of both sexes chose each other as valentines by a spe- 
cies of lottery". 

Later, was started the idea of sending coupled-verses, 
valentines. Elegantly phrased (some of them), works of 
art, as if artist and writer vied for honors in making them 
beautiful. If some particular person, whom we prize, sends 
a valentine, what a day of pleasure it is. 

Relegated to oblivion are the horrid old "comics", with 
their insinuations, — like pent-up revenge seeking to express 
some disgruntled notion. W'e never see them any more, 
thank goodness ! 

The valentines we do see are adorable. Don't you still 
like those new models of old-fashioned "lacey" valentines? 
Then there are the handsome red satin heart-shaped boxes 
for candy, or "bon-bons" as the Parisians say. 

The florist, too, is a partner of St. Valentine, evidently. 
Marvelous flowers, in perfectly gorgeous boxes, have a way 
of saying the luxurious story better than words. Then, of 
course, if a devoted suitor has enlargement of the heart, 
there are the jewelers. 

If the valentine happens to be a solitaire, then we know 
that wedding bells are being tuned and two hearts are thor- 
oughly beating as "one". 

St. Valentine's Day ! Long may this master of cere- 
monies rule and may his constituents multiply! 

* * * 
California Poetry Club 
Will Give Valentine Dance 

California, the land of world-famed poets and writers of 
renown, makes claim to many literary organizations, — the 
personnel of each being closely allied with the poets and 
the authors of other climes. 

In San Francisco is a branch of the National organiza- 
tion, the California Poetry Club, Inc., whose headquarters 
are in New York. Members must qualify for enrollment 
by submitting professional work. Their standards have 
prompted the output of creative lines and brought together 
people who find incentive for work by mingling with those 
who have "arrived". 

On the evening of Wednesday, February twenty-fifth, 
the California Poetry Club will give a Costume Dance and 
Valentine Party. The gala event will be inaugurated by a 
grand march forming into cotillion figures and dissolving 



By Antoinette Arnold 

into the waltz. It is going to be an attractive affair, pic- 
torially, and a notable affair, individually. Many promi- 
nent people in the local world of letters and art will partici- 
pate in the merry making. Every one is cautioned to for- 
get his or her identity, and be a valentine. 

Many of the participants will impersonate characters in 
fiction or from the classics or from the sentimental verses 
written on a bov-and-girl valentine. Anyway, it is going 
to be a charming party. Eleanor Ross is chairman of the 
event and has prepared an attractive musical and literary 
program. Mrs. Avalon Salbador and Beatrice Judd Ryan 
are assisting the chairman, aiming to make the Valentine 
Party a great success. Mrs. N. Laurence Nelson is the 
president; Madefrey Odhner is first vice-president; and 
Eleanor Ross is the second vice-president. 

* * * 
Successful Horse Show 

An aftermath of the spectacular horseshow held at the 
Municipal Auditorium, at Oakland, which thousands of 
spectators viewed for the first time, was the supper dance 
and Fashion Revue held at the Hotel Oakland. Though 
many were hosts at their homes before the revue, a large 
number made reservations for the post event at the hos- 
telry. The crystal ballroom was elaborately decorated 
with great shields adorned with the red and gold and black, 
and multi-colored lighting effects. At one end of the ball- 
room the stage was set for the display of beauty and fashion, 
in spring modes and equestrienne apparel. The orchestra 
played within a quaint setting a high walled garden and 
trailing vines. 

Among those who were hosts at supper were Mr. and 
Mrs. Philip Bowles. Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Hynes, Mr. and 
Mrs. John Bryant Knox. Mr. and Mrs. S. E. Biddle, Mr. 
and Mrs. George C. Jensen. Mr. and Mrs. Atholl McBean. 
Mrs. Claude Gatch, Mr. and Mrs. George Walker, Mr. and 
Mrs. Leon Bocqueraz. Mrs. J. P. H. Dunn, Mr. and Mrs. 
Herman Michels, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Watson Cushing, 
Mr. and Mrs. George W. Baker Jr., Mr. and Mrs. W. C. 
Jergans, Mr. and Mrs. James Eaves and Dr. and Mrs. David 
Prescott Barrows. 

Before the performance there were many dinners, among 
which were those given by Mrs. Wigginton Creed, Mr. 
and Mrs. Harry Mosher, Mr. and Mrs. Herman Michels, 
Mr. and Mrs. George W. Baker Jr. and Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas Watson Cushing. 

The program started Friday evening, a total of seventy- 
five events running through Saturday, Monday and Tues- 
day afternoons and evenings, closing with the $2000 stake 
for five-gaited horses, pronounced by horse fanciers to be 
the banner stake of the year. 

Horse lovers offered $19,000 in cash prizes for prize win- 
ners of the different classes. In addition eighteen gold 
medals were hung up and twelve silver trophies awarded. 
Owners did not compete for prizes, however, but entered 
their stables because of the love of fine horses. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 IluMli Street, Between Powell and Stockton, Snn Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHBN, Proprietor 






HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 

Telephone gutter 6130 Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



February 14, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



A principal feature was the W. \V. Garth- 
waite stake of $1000 for the hackney pony 
event. Saturday afternoon the W. W. Mines 
$500 stake for junior five-gaited saddle horses 
was judged. At night the American Bank 
$2000 stake for heavy harness horses was the 
feature, with an exhibit of Marco H. Hell- 
man's famous Western stock horses and 
equipment. 

What sportsmen consider to be the big 
sporting event of the show was the $2000 
stake participated in by "Robin Hood", owned 
by Mrs. William Roth of San Francisco ; 
"Moon Magic", owned by Herbert Woolf of 
Kansas City; "Sinbad", owned by P. E. 
Bowles of Piedmont ; and "Rosewall". owned 
by Irving H. Hellman of Los Angeles. H. L. 
Daniels, the noted rider, exhibited "Robin 
Hood" for Mrs. Roth. 

:(! $ :)« 

Mrs. C. O. G. Miller's home on Pacific ave- 
nue had the honor of having the first meeting 
of a new organization, the "Hour of Music So- 
ciety", from which, for all its modest aim, far-reaching re- 
sults may be reached if the hope of the founders is realized. 

* * * 

Announcement has come from Stockton of the marriage 
of Miss Mary Eglinton Montgomery and William Wyatt 
Wales. 

The bride is the only daughter of Rev. and Mrs. Hugh 
Eglinton Montgomery, and the bridegroom is the son of 
the late Major Philip Gray Wales of Menlo Park, for many 
years in the American diplomatic service abroad. The mar- 
riage is the happy sequel to an acquaintance of many years, 
ever since their early school days. 

* * * 

Dr. and Mrs. James G. Fitzgibbon announce the engage- 
ment of their daughter. Miss Adeline Mae Fitzgibbon, to 
Irving Victor Moulin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Gabriel Moulin. 
The wedding will be an event of this summer. 

Both families are well known in this city, the engaged 
couple having been born and educated in the local schools 
and universities. Miss Fitzgibbon is a cousin of Miss Eliza- 
beth Fitzgibbon, Mrs. Ralph Heger and Mrs. Brooke Mo- 
hun. The late Dr. Gerald Fitzgibbon was an uncle. 

* * * 

Mrs. Selim E. Woodworth announces the betrothal of 
her daughter Miss Dorothy, to Andrew Cassell, sun of Mrs. 
John Cassell and brother of John Cassell Jr. 

Miss Woodworth returned recently from abroad, having 

been in Europe with her brother. Captain Wethered W 1- 

worth, U. S. A., now at Quantico, Va. She is a sister of 
Selim E. Woodworth Jr., and a niece of Mrs. ( ■. II. F. Mar- 
tinez of Berkeley. 

For years the Woodworth family lived in Berkeley, but 
they have returned here, taking an apartment on Russian 

Hill. 

* * * 

At an exceedingly pretty wedding at the quarters of 
Captain and Mrs. George Brown at the Mare Island Navy 
Yard, Miss Katharine Brown was married to Ensign 
Thomas Eyler Beattie, U. S. X. 

Lieutenant Allison Hayes. U. S. X . chaplain of the yard, 
read the service before a screen of flowers. Japanese flower- 




HOTKL, CANTICRUURY 
750 Sutter Street 

San Francisco's Finest 
Family Hotel 
250 Rooms 
ites: From $2.50 per day 



To Europe --Norway Cruises --South America 
West Indies 

ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET COMPANY 

"The Comfort HiHIte" 

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I'liom- Sutter tim- 



ing quince and lilies, in the drawing room of 
the Brown quarters. Dozens of candles 
throughout the house shed a soft glow. 

A quaint touch of bygone formality and 
charm was the bride's costume, the gown in 
which her grandmother was married to Ad- 
miral George Brown in 1871. 

The Hotel Whitcomb Celebrates 

A party synonymous with the fun and frolic 
attending St. Valentine's Day, will be given 
at the Hotel Whitcomb on Saturday evening, 
February 14th at 7 :30 o'clock. This day will 
also commemorate the third anniversary of 
this popular hostelry, which has always made 
a feature of unique and interesting social 
functions. 

* * * 

Community Chest Workers 
Within the Social Whirl 

One of the notes of this year's Community 
Chest campaign is the interest in the work by 
women prominent in social life. 

Many of these women are serving on committees, others 
are enrolled as members of the volunteer army which will 
conduct the third annual appeal which started Tuesday 
morning, February 10. This year the Community Chest 
is asking for $2,492,546, for the operating expenses during 
the year of 104 helpful societies. 

Among the twenty division are two led by Mrs. Joseph 
A. Donohoe and Miss Edith Elizabeth Leale. Serving with 
Mrs. Donohoe as majors and captains are the following: 
Major battalion A, Mrs. Perry Eyre; captains, Mrs. Charles 
Bransten, Mrs. F. S. Loop, Mrs. Marshall Madison, Mrs. 
Louis J. Carl, Miss Jean Mcintosh. 

Major battalion B, Miss Mary Emma Flood ; captains, 
Miss Cecile Brooke, Miss Christine Donohoe, Miss Inez 
Macondray, Mrs. James Moffit, Mrs. Herman Pheleger. 

Major battalion C. Miss Alice Schussler; captains, Mrs. 
Charles N. Felton, Mrs. Ferdinand Peterson, Mrs. Jerome 
Politzer, Mrs. Atholl McBean, Mrs. C. E. Adock. 

Major battalion D, Mrs. Cleaveland Forbes; captains, 
Mrs. Spencer Buckbee, Mrs. Haskett Derby, Mrs. Stewart 
Elliott, Mrs. Jesse Steinhart, Mrs. Randolph Whiting. 

Major battalion E, Mrs. Walter A. Haas ; captains, Mrs. 
Albert Schwabacher. Mrs. Morgan Gunst, Mrs. Herbert 
Clayburgh, Mrs. Daniel E. Koshland, Mrs. Philip Lilienthal. 

Serving with Miss Edith Elizabeth Leale as majors and 
captains are: Major battalion A, Mrs. B. M. Breeden; cap- 
tains. Miss Beatrice Rossi, Mrs. Francis F. Knorp, Mrs. 
William G. Drum, Mi-:- Mary Fay, Miss Josephine Sheehy. 

Major battalion B, Miss Alice Griffith; captains, Mrs. 
Vernon Skewes-Cox, Miss Camilla Loyall, Mrs. Kenneth G. 
Mcintosh. Mrs. Joseph Sloss, Miss Sara Coffin. 

Major battalion C. Miss Elsie E. Howell; captains, Mrs. 
Henry B. Mills, Mrs. W. H. Haskins. Mrs. F. E. Palmer, 
Mrs. P. \V. King. Mrs. Leon Enemark. 



I Social and Business Engraving i 



Personal Service Given - Orders Called For 
at your Home or Office. 

INGRIM-RUTLEDGE COMPANY 

STATIONERS - ENGRAVERS 
Telephone 419-423 Montgomery Street 

SUTTER 6874 Ncar California 

Memorial Engrossing a specialty 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 14, 1925 




By Hoot McGregor 



Friend Hoot : 

Seeing that you are very familiar with most of the leading 
golfers of our city and some writer yourself, I wish to ask 
you a favor. 

Can you tell me who this Fred Blair is that writes that 
goofy stuff for The Bulletin ? 

This fellow Blair seems to have it on every golf writer 
in San Francisco. 

He can tell how old you are, how long you have been playing 
golf, whether you count them all, or if you kick them out of 
the rough. 

The reason I am asking you this dark secret is because 
of his knowledge of all these things and yet one never sees 
him on a golf course, which seems very strange. 

I have heard that he is English, but that could never be, 
for no man could have such a sense of humor as Blair has 
and be English. 

His "Personalities" that he runs in The Bulletin are clever, 
hit the mark, clean and full of kick. 

All Blair has to do is take a peep at you or have you give him 
a cue, then he does the rest. 

His remarks about the thousands of golfers that he meets 
during a year have done much to stimulate golf and bound it 
up to the standard it has reached today. 

As a golf writer he has no peer — His knowledge of the 
game is of long standing, for they say he was one of the lead- 
ing players in the North of England some thirty years ago, 
long before golf became a national sport in America. 

Blair seems to be a very fair minded individual, for 
whether you be a star or a mere dub golfer he never fails to 
give you recognition if you have earned it and that is where 
he has it on most of the other writers. 

He is the most sought for scribe in the country on account 
of his wide experience of the game. He has the following 
of every business and professional man in our city and no 
matter whether it be the Elks, Real Estate, Shrine, Rotary. 
Bankers, Mutual Business men, Civitan, or Exchange clubs 
that want to promote a golf tournament, they immediately get 
in touch with this popular writer. 

They also tell us that he is an honorary member of more 
than a dozen of the leading clubs of our city and never for- 
gets to give them a good line in his popular column whenever 
he gets the chance. 

One of Blair's favorite pastimes is breaking world's records 
on a golf course. 

At the present time he has signed up six hundred and fifty- 
six of our influenzal business and professional men to play in 
the Northern California Amateur Municipal championship 
golf tournament which is being held on the Municipal Course 
at Lincoln Park. 

This is one of the greatest things that ever happened in the 
world in terms of entries for a championship event and the 
greatest boost San Francisco ever got. 

Bill Bailey, another goofy writer on The Bulletin, sized it 
up in this fashion — When he read that a world's record had 
been broken with 656 signing up to play in a golf tournament. 

Bill said it only showed that there were more golf nuts in 
San Francisco than any other part of the world — Perhaps Bill 
is right. 

Don't forget ibis is not the only record I '.lair has set. 

Three years ago playing over Lincoln Park, he had 365 
youngsters ranging from eight to sixteen years of age who 



competed in a championship event and young Charlie Ferrera 
won the honors. 

Blair was never known to quit and that is why Jack Houston, 
editor of the Masonic World, has asked Blair to help him 
with his golf tournament which he hopes to put over in the 
near future, when the fifty-two Blue Lodges of Masonry hold 
their initial golf tournament on one of our local links. 

Houston has offered a $1,000 gold vase as one of the many 
trophies which will be competed for. 

Jack says that Blair is such a good go-getter that he expects 
at least one thousand will enter this classic event. 

Hugh King McKevitt. the present pole of the Shrine, who 
is some golfer himself, claims that there is no club big enough 
to stage the event. Blair said to leave it to him, he will put 
it over. 

Blair seems to have the confidence and respect of every 
big business man in San Francisco and whether it be Herbert 
Fleishhacker of the Anglo Bank, or William F. Humphrey, 
president of the Olympic Club, it makes no difference. 

Everybody is willing to go to the bat for this popular Olym- 
pian. That is why I wish you would inform me in your next 
issue of the San Francisco Xews Letter who this mysterious 
Fred Blair is. 

— From an Interested Reader. 



It's only 39 days to Saint Patrick's Day tournament. 



Mme. Bernice de Pasquali 

Mine. Bernice de Pasquali, American diva, who sang the 
leading coloratura roles, succeeding Sembrich and starring 
with Caruso for seven years in the Metropolitan Co., has been 
given the coveted title role in the new Opera St. Cecilia, called 
the Italian "Parsifal." Mons. Refice, protege of Pope Pius XI. 
and considered the foremost brilliant young composer has set 
to music the libretto of the poet Muci, on the life and martyr- 
dom of St. Cecilia, and the entire work of this sacred mystical 
Opera from an historic, spectacular and musical viewpoint is 
considered very beautiful and is awaited with keen interest. 

The world premier will be held in Rome this spring under 
the auspices of the dignitaries of the Church at the Costanza 
Opera and will be heard in this country in the major centers 
after its showing at the Manhattan in New York. 

In recognition of her glorious voice and art Mme. de Pas- 
quali was recently given the highest honor musically in Eu- 
rope, that of Honorary membership in the Royal Academy 
Philharmonic of Rome and is the only singer in the world 
so distinguished. The Queen of Italy, Mussolini and the 
great composers are members. The late Puccini was also an 
Academician. 

Mme. de Pasquali is a Daughter of the American Revolution, 
birth place, Boston, whose father was Captain Win. James 
U. S. A. retired. She married the late Count S. M. de Pasquali 
while pursuing her studies in Rome. Her ancestry dates to 
the Lovells and Dills of Mayflower time. During the war she 
raised over a million dollars in the Liberty Drives, at that time 
she was made an Honorary Colonel in the 21st U. S. Inf. 
Recently in Chicago she was made an Honorary Elk. Was 
given the Key to Boston and was recently given the "Key to 
San Francisco's Heart." In Minneapolis the Key was given 
her with the inscription. "To America's Beloved and Greatest 
Soprano." 



February 14, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 




By Edwin F. Marriott 

Baseball. When Bert Ellison, manager of the San Fran- 
cisco Seals signed a contract with his higher-ups to con- 
tinue to boss the team through to the season of 1926, there 
was one of the best all-around ball players on the coast put 
to work, for a while. 

Ellison has been manager of the Seals since last year 
and his contract still holds for some time, but he now makes 
it possible to be with the team for at least one year after 
this season. 

Contrary to the fact that baseball is considered the prime 
American Game, it has not surpassed in popularity its old 
rival, football. Last year's season on the gridiron was, to 
say the least, very strenuous, the public spending many mil- 
lions of dollars to see the various teams try to tear each 
other apart legally. The money-spenders want a run for 
their money and in football they get it. The popularity of 
baseball has been dwindling a little so when the big pro- 
moters of baseball start to build up their game by signing 
up for long terms such men as Ellison, they are trying to 
bring back the nest egg, and stir up interest. 

* * * 

Swimming. The marvelous feats of America's swim- 
mers in Paris during the last Olympiad, especially the 
women swimmers, has been recognized by the entire Aqua- 
tic world. Now to the fore comes our all-around champion 
mermaid for 1924, Helen Wainwright. She has decided that 
she is a little tired of swimming back and forth in the small 
ponds supplied to her in this country, so she is off for 
Merry England to tackle the famous channel that has for 
many years managed to keep peace between France and 
England. She has a very rough swim ahead of her and if 
she is successful then many a powerful man will have to 
bow his head in reverence to our womanhood. There have 
been a lot of very powerful male swimmers attempt this 
feat but success has not been their's. 

Eleanor Garratti, the San Rafael girl swimmer; is just 
readv to go to Florida. She is a little Italian girl who has 
come rapidly to a front rank position through her aquatic 
abilities. Her last performance was at the new Crystal 
Palace Plunge. She will he heard from in world prominence 
before long. 

Four members of the national collegiate champion swim- 
ming team from Northwestern University will soon invade 
the West. They arc making the journey in conjunction 
with their Glee Club. 

* * * 

Boxing. It is now quite evident that Hollywood i- not 
going to take a back scat to New York in either moving 
picture production or in the naming of future boxing champs 
to succeed Jack Dempsey and Kenny Leonard. In fact 
Captain Seth Strellinger, chairman of the State Athletic 
Commission is watching the bouts in Vernon where in- 
terest seems to center on heavyweight bouts and at the 
Hollywood American Legion Stadium in Hollywood where 
the lightweight classics seem to be the thing in order. 
Vernon will stage the eliminations to rind the best heavy 
to oppose New York's choice for a contender to Dempsey's 
laurels. And there are a lot of good boys on this 
very anxious to gain the honors he holds now. to say nothing 
of the bank account that goes with it. 



Rowing. Oarsmanship as a sport has been more or less 
popular in the San Francisco Bay region for many years 
thanks to the efforts of the South End Rowing Club and a 
few devout individuals who love the sport. 

Over at the University of California the boys pack up 
their "trunks" everyday after classes and get down to the 
Oakland Estuary to their new $11,000 boathouse and start 
their training, for the season will soon be here. "Crew" 
seems to be very popular with the Berkeley boys and they 
have five boat loads of aspirants. 



Time 




Card 



THE DEPENDABLE AUTOMOBILE FERRY Route offers 
motorists the shortest and most direct means of transporta- 
tion from Oakland, San Francisco, and all points south, to 
Vallejo, Sacramento, Sonoma, Napa and Lake Counties and 
all points north. 



Leave Oakland 


111 


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8:15 


P.M. 


0:00 


i- 


P.M. 


8:45 


12:20 


0:30 


K 


12:20 


0:15 


12:40 


10:00 


o 


12:40 


0:45 


1:00 


10:30 


I 


1:00 


10:15 


1:20 


11:00 


CO 


1:20 


10:45 


1:40 


•11:30 




1:40 


•11:15 


2:00 


•12:00 


111 


2:00 


•11:45 


2:20 


•12:30 


I 




•12:15 




- 1 :00 


r- 




•11:45 



'Saturdays. Sondnys, 

Traffic. tSundnys nnd 

AVEN 



Holldny* — Extra Trips During Heavy 
Hnllilnys only. 
J. HAXFORD, Pres. and Gen. Marr. 



DR. B. W. HAINES 



Elkan Gunst Building 

323 Geary at Powell 

San Francisco 



DENTIST 



Hours 9 to 4 
Telephone Douglas 2949 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE 

The Mineral Development Company. Location of Principal Place of 
RaMlnexN, San FrancUco, California. 

Notice Is hereby given that at a regular meeting of the directors 
held on the 13th day of January. 1925. an assessment of one-half cent 
per shar. was levied upon the issued capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in legal money of the United States, to the Sec- 
retary, at the office of the Company. Room No. 237 Monadnock Build- 
ing. San Francisco. California. 

Anv stock on which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the ioin 
day of February. 1925. will be delinquent and advertised for sale at 
public auction, and unless payment is made before will be sold on 
Friday, the 20th day of March. 1925. to pay the delinquent assessment, 
together with costs of advertising and expense of sale. 

M. J. SEELY Secretary. 
237 Monadnock Building. San Francisco. California. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 14, 1925 



Hollywood Gossip 

By Madeline Jamison 



WHAT would Hollywood do without Elinor Glyn and 
Harry Carr? It's certain that if either one of them 
should decide to abandon the cinema world there would be 
great lamentations. For without Harry Carr to tell us just 
how bad we are in his daily column, the Lancer; and Elinoi 
Glyn to correct our manners and morals, we would be lost. 
Mr. Carr takes a rap at almost every thing. He says that 
•'Hollywood is a state of mind," or words to that effect, and 
while' he admits that it is a nice place to live in. he de- 
plores the "atmosphere." He doesn't like to hear about 
women going to have babies, or to see bathing beauties 
naked feet, and he thinks that it is almost a crime to drink- 
tea for breakfast. Isn't he a joy? What would we do 
without him ! 

It is said that Elinor Glyn has helped more stars and 
near-stars, to real success than any other person in Holly- 
wood. She loves to "find" people and start them on the 
right road, and she seems to have an almost uncanny faculty 
for seeing just how they should look and what they should 
do to bring about their advancement. She is absolutely 
tireless in her efforts to improve her protegees, once she 
becomes interested in them. 

At a tea, not long ago, a newcomer from the East was 
talking about the impression one got of the personal appear- 
ance of people from reading the things they wrote. 

"Do you know," she said, "I have had to make oyer every 
single one of my mental photographs. Elinor Glyn was 
my first shock. Her writings are so full of sex. that I thought 
she must be a very large, voluptuous looking person. I was 
a guest at the Writers' Club, not long ago. and a lovely, 
delicate, partician looking woman with perfectly gorgeous 
red hair sat in front of me between two young chaps, one 
blonde and the other dark. I knew she was English for 
I could hear her voice. I was fascinated by her hair, it was 
braided in two braids and wrapped around her head, very 
simply, but with her dead white skin and her cameo-like 
profile, she made a striking picture. It \va> Elinor Glyn! 
Then there is Harry Carr. I had been reading his column, 
and from the dreadfully acrimonious things he writer about 
women, I had him pictured as a confirmed bachelor, tall 
and dark, with a long, cynical face, who had been disap- 
pointed in love, but who, nevertheless, cherished a secret 
passion for one of the Gish girls. And then I saw him the 
opening night, of Romola at Grauman's! A little, fat, bald 
man with kind looking eyes and a young-lady daughter. 
Which all goes to show that you never can tell what people- 
look like from reading the things they write." 



Thos. Carney Company AUTO LOANS 

Resources $1,000,000 
WE FINANCE YOU 
Immediate Service — No Red Tape — Strictly Confidential 
We will re-finance your contract. Pay up 
present balance and reduce payments. 
You repay us by small monthly install- 
ments on new contract and 

YOU DRIVE YOUR CAR 
41 Franklin St San Francisco, Cal. Phone Hemlock 1082 



TRADEMARK. -—• -»• ^m^ , 4 

Af Motor Oils 




Are recognized by the highest authorities in engine 
building as the most economical, efficient and uniform In 
quality — 

A PURE PENNSYLVANIA PRODUCT 

VALVOLINE OIL COMPANY 

462 Bryant St., San Francisco 122 Center St., Los Angeles 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that a vigorous* (.rushing once or twice a day Is 
taking very good eare of them. Brushing is only a part of the 
process. Many things can happen to your teeth wli l«-h only a 
competent dentist can take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be ns Hound us you imagine. A toothache meant* 
trouble; do not wait for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth sore? Do your gunin bleed? Call In today 
and talk It over. It will cost nothing. My nerve blocking Kys- 
tem blocks off all nerves and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. H0AGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfleld 335 

SPECIALISTS — ExtrncMona! I nrani; Self Cleaning Brldee»| 

Poreelnln Work and RooScnh Plates 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED AND GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per dayf 97. SO per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage of Automobiles 



SANITARY DRINKING WATER 

For Homes, Offices and Factories. Quality Guaranteed 

KEYSTONE WATER COMPANY 

130 Russ St. Phone Hemlock 170 San Francisco 



ARE YOUR BRAKES SAFE? 

We Specialize on Brakes Only---Flat Prices on All Cars 

S. F. BRAKE SERVICE 

ST. FRANCIS GARAGE, 1240 POST STREET 

(Bet. Van Ness Ave. and Franklin St.) 

Phone Prospect 1915 







TEL. FRAXKLIX 3085 

Metal Work Apper- 
tainlng to Automo- 
biles — Oxy- Acetylene 
Welding — Ulnck- 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



Income Tax Service 



Advice Given and Returns Made at Your Home, 
by Appointment. 

J. Leo Park 

230 Russ Building — 235 Montgomery Street 
Phone Garfield 5364 



February 14, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller, 

Director of Publicity 

National Automobile Club 

A BILL is now before the Legislature 
to provide for the improvement and 
maintenance of the Madera Highway in 
ihe Yosemite National Park, according 
to the Touring Bureau of the National 
Automobile Club. This is one of the 
most popular routes into the Yosemite 
and traverses a district of great interest 
through its historical associations. 

The Federal Government is preparing 
to widen the present road from the floor 
of the Valley to Wawona and the Mari- 
posa Big Trees in order to convert it into 
a two-way road. An appropriation of 
one and one-half million dollars has been 
made for this purpose by Congress. The 
money is now available and the Bureau 
of National Parks will begin construc- 
tion immediately. The inclusion of this 
road, therefore, in the California High- 
way system will insure the maintenance 
of the direct connection with the govern- 
ment road from Yosemite Valley to 
Wawona and the Mariposa Big Trees. 
This route is forty-nine miles shorter 
than the northern routes for the traveler 
coming to Yosemite from the smith. 

It has the easiest grades of any road 
entering the Valley and the completion 
of the Pacheco Pass Highway adds to its 
value as the traveler from San Francisco 
may reach Madera by way oi O.ilroy and 
Califa and proceed to Yosemite without 
the necessity of crossing the bay. It also 
opens the Yosemite district to the resi- 
dents of the coast countries who may 
reach Madera by way of the Pacheco Pass 
and Cholame PaSS. 

The completion of the El Portal road 
will serve only to increase the traffic over 
the Madera-Wawona- Yosemite Discovery 
route inasmuch as the tourist will be at- 
tracted by the possibility of entering over 
one route and leaving by the other. It 
also opens to the motorist an inspiring 
mountain panorama from the summit of 



the control road entering the Valley and 

Inspiration Point. 

The cost of maintenance is estimated 
at between $10,000 and $15,000 annually 
ami owing to the fact that the motorists 
of the state use this road far more than 
the residents of Madera County, it is 
generally believed that the state should 
bear this burden of road maintenance. 

Nine thousand miles a month. That 
is the average distance now being trav- 
eled by the service cars of the National 
Automobile Club in rendering road serv- 
ice to members. Some of these calls 
necessitate ten to twelve hours on the 
road but the Club pays the bills so the 
member has nothing to worry about. 

The need for this service, unlimited 
as it is by zone restrictions, is evidenced 
by the fact that sixty percent of the 
members of the Club have made use of 
one of the Club's service features at one 
time or another during the operation of 
the state-wide organization. 

The service most in demand during the 
last six months has been the free towing 
feature, members being entitled in case of 
breakdown on the road to the assistance 
of a tow car and a tow to the nearest 
official service unit or garage. This in- 
cludes cars stuck in mud or sand. 

Second service in importance, judged 
by the number of calls, is roadside repair. 
This service provides a half hour of ex- 
pert mechanical assistance on the road in 
addition to the time consumed in travel- 
ing from the service unit of the location 
of the disabled car. 

Hundreds of members have called on 
the club garages to bring them gasoline 
or oil out on the open road and many 
women driving alone have tried out the 
prompt and efficient tire change service 
inaugurated by the Club. 

The motoring public, at large, is rapid- 
ly realizing that the most important serv- 
ice featured" an automobile club is pro- 
tection on the road rather than merely 
performing the functions of an informa- 
tion bureau. 

This fact is proved by the rapidly grow- 
ing membership of the National Automo- 
bile Club which is the only organization 
offering these roadside services without 
distance limitations. 

* * * 

The Victory Highway Association has 

announced its plan for the establishment 
of a chain of California information sta- 
tions all the way across the continent, ac- 
cording to the announcement of Ben 
Blow, manager of the Association in a 
letter to the western headquarters at the 
National Automobile Club. 

These information bureaus will carry 
folders describing various parts of Cali- 
fornia, as well as a complete file of Na- 
tional Automobile Club material prepared 
for the enlightenment of the tourist as 
to the charms of California. 

The first California type bungalow 
which will bouse the Topeka Bureau will 
be built this year, according to Plow. 



Automobile license plates of 1925 are 
uniform in size and limited in six num- 
bers, The following tabulation, prepared 
bj the Touring Bureau of the National 
Automobile Club, shows how the plate 
numbers are to be read: 



Numbers 


Indicated on Plate 


9 


9 


99 


99 


999 


9_99 


9,999 


99-99 


99,999 


99-')')') 


999,999 


999-999 


1.000,001 


A-l 


1.0(1' ).999 


A-99-99 


1,0')'),')')') 


A-99-999 


1,100,001 


B-l 


1,109,999 


B-99-99 


1,199,')')') 


B-99-999 


1,200,001 


C-l 


etc. 


etc. 



1,300,000 will bear initial E. 
Dealers bear initial D. 



CYCOL 



MOTOR. OIL 



MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE, 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
IhenewHEXEON ' 
process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 
SAN FRANCISCO 



lacfl cor ojberated\z^ 
by ret table 
chauffeurs 
who thoroughly under- 
stand their Aust/tess 



This means that you 
can dispense with all 
worries as to personal 
security when using 
our cars. Our drivers 
are careful and they 
never violate your de- 
sires for safety. 




Phone FrnnklfL. 217 
1629 Pine Street 
San FrancUco 



^ri!P* 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 14, 1925 



S. W. Straus & Co. and Sales Staff Dine at Cafe Marquard 

Last week Mr. Arthur W. Straus, a vice-president of S. W. 
Straus & Company, financiers of national fame, visited San 
Francisco, combining business with pleasure. On his re- 
turn to Los Angeles his enthusiastic account of conditions 
here, so interested his brothers Mr. S. W. and Mr. S. J. T. 
Straus, that they immediately made arrangements to have 
their sales force from Los Angeles come here to look over 
and familiarize themselves with local conditions. Repre- 
sentatives of the company from Los Angeles, San Diego, 
Pasadena, Long Beach and Santa Barbara, arrived in this 
city Thursday and will terminate their visit with a banquet 
at the Cafe Marquard, this Saturday evening, being the 
guests of the San Francisco branch officers. Following will 
be the menu: 

Tomato stuffed with Crab 1000 Island Dressing 

Olives Celery Radishes 

Petit Marmite Soup 

Sweetbread and Chicken Liver Pattie 

Roast Prime Ribs of Beef, au Jus 

Cottage Fried Potatoes String Beans au Beurre 

Frozen Egg Nog Assorted Cakes 

Demi Tasse 

Marquard's Revue will aid in the entertainment. 



WHERE TO DINE 



Where Quality Costs Less 



At the factory where mattresses 
are made is the best place to buy 
yonr mattress. The quality of oar 
products, we believe, is above ques- 
tion. With quality assurance you 
get the advantage of the actual fac- 
tory price. 

The money you would pay for a 
very poorly built mattress at a 
store will buy a high -grade and 
fully guaranteed mattress here. Many 
different models from which to 
choose— $11.75 to $47.50. 



Craftsman-Built 
Hair Mattress 

FACTORY $0/1 

PRICE ^^T 

FULLY GUARANTEED 

Positively the biggest value in a 
hair mattress obtainable; 4% inches 
thick; tine grade ticking; gives long 
service and satisfaction; stores ask 
$32 for equal quality. 

Free delivery — city or country 



dLPfeRostey 



MATTRESS FACTORY 



1506 Market St., Corner Van Ness (No Branches) 



Colors of 

Initials 

Gold 
Black 
Green 
Lavender 
Red 
Silver 
Blue 
Yellow 
White 
Gun Metal Black 

$5.00 

for 100 Packs 




$2.00 



Color of 
Match Packs 

Gold 

Black 
Blue 

Yellow 

Silver 

Orange 

Light Blue 

Purple 

Lavender 

$3.SO 

for 50 Packs 



for 12 Packs 



MONOGRAM MATCH PACKS 

(TRADE MARK) 
With Your Own Initials — In a Neat Box. Ideal for the dinner, Mah Jongg or Bridge 
Table. The smartest smoking accessory. A charming gift. In Oval, Diamond Shape, 
or Block Type. Be sure to stale color of pack, color of initial and style of type 
desired. Mail your order and check at once to 

MONOGRAM MATCH COMPANY 
1402 De Young Building San Francisco, Calif. 

Or at Your Dealers: S. & G Gump Co., San Francisco; City of Paris, San Fran- 
cisco; Roos Bros., San Francisco; Paul Elder Co., San Francisco; Fairmont Hotel, 
San Francisco; Howell Dohrmann Co., Oakland; J. W. Robinson Co., Los Angeles; 
Miss Guyelle, Honolulu, T. H.; Meier and Frank Co., Portland, Ore. 



CAFE MARQUARD 



1 - — 

\ 

T 


'] 




_i- 




-J 






lii 


: 




ill 



Adjoining Wilkes and Curran 

Theaters, Geary and Mason. 

Phone Prospect 61 

1925 REVUE 

Sparkling Entertainment 
DINING— DANCING 

After-Theater Suppers 
Superb Service 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

THE MOST POPULAR RESTAURANT IN SAN FRANCISCO 
OS Poat Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4536 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners, $1.25. Meals Served a la Carte. 

Also Regular French and Italian Dinners. 

Fish and Game a Specialty 



BLANCO'S 

O'Fnrrell and Larkln Streets Phone Franklin O 

No visitor should leave the city without dining 

in the finest cafe in America 

Luncheon (11 :30 to 2 p. m.) - 75c 

Dinner, Week Days _______ $1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays - $1.75 



The only real artistic place in the Latin Quarter. Bohemian 

dinner, 75c — served every evening. Saturday, Sunday and 

Holidays, $1.25. Dancing from 7 to 1 every evening. 

BEGIN'S BOLOGNA RESTAURANT 

240 Columbus Avenue Phone Sutter 8825 



Louis Cerles. Jean Barrere, John Plegth. Props. 

NEW SHARON GRILL 

Formerly Bergez-Frank's Old Poodle Dog, Bush Street 

35 NEW MONTGOMERY STREET 

Opposite Palace Hotel Phone Sutter 8008 



Women's 

! Breakfasts 35c-50c 
A 


Building Sandwich 

212 Ellis 
Lunch 50c Table d'hote 
la carte orders at all times 


Shop 

Dinner 60c 





MaryHereth Caroline Jones 

Luncheon is served from 1 1 :30 to 2 :30 
and tea from 3 to 5 



vH*3&r& 334 Sutter St. 



and. 



Douglas 7118 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

l>« Third Avenue. SAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 

Open From 

11:30 a. m. to 2:00 p. m. 

5:30 p. m. to 8:30 p. m. 

Sundays and Holidays 

4:30 to 8:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 
Hnlf Block from Highway 



February 14, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



By PLUTO 




FINAN CE 



DOLLARS 

— and— ■ 



SENSE 




INSURANCE 



THERE is no question of the tide of prosperity as ap- 
pears from the just published results of January. Divi- 
dends were never paid so generally and so generously, ac- 
cording to the knowing only ones. Industrials and public 
utilities were equally successful in making the grade. No 
less than sixteen public utility companies increased their 
dividends. There surely does not seem to be much of an 
impetus to sell short in this sort of a record. 

* * * 

— It is reported that income of wage earners is also in- 
creasing. This in flat contradiction of reports that have 
come from the East, but seems to be supported by convinc- 
ing facts. With stockholders' incomes increasing, as well, 
there would seem to be no danger of insufficient funds at 
present and improvements that have been waiting may 

* "' "! 'U3>[B}J3pun 3q A"|ajBS 

— The small investor is a great trial to a social system 
which endeavors to protect him. He, apparently, has a 
practically unlimited zeal for running into trouble. There 
was enough money lost by this class last year to buy out 
seventeen of the largest power and light companies in the 
country with a united capital of $1,900,000,000. The stup- 
idity of the people knows no limits. In a community which 
publishes its regular financial reports and to which there 
is accessible a plenty of good bonds which will produce a 
regular and satisfactory return only folly can produce such 
results. There should be a more satisfactory way of edu- 
cating the small investor. 

— The national banks of the United States have surpassed 
their own record. The Controller of the Currency places 
the combined resources of the 8049 reporting national banks 
at $24,381,281,000 on last December 31st. This is the high- 
est total that the banks have ever reached and is two bil- 
lions more than last year. The gain shown during the last 
three months of the year was more than a billion. The 
cash in the vaults on that date was $409,566,000, a gain of 
nearly fifty millions since the last call in ( Ictober. It may 
be safely said that never in human history has there been 
a showing which even approaches that of these banks. 

* * * 

— It is pretty well conceded among respectable and well- 
informed financial agents that the recent fall in the price 
of wheat succeeding the phenomenal rise was very bene- 
ficial. There is a limit to what will be paid fur wheat and 
the knowing ones are convinced that two dollars represents 
that limit. Much over that, indeed practically anything 
Over that, would cause a diminution in demand following a 
falling off in consumption. 

* * * 

— It is true that there is no boom in business as was 
prophesied by the careless who take their cue from the 
stock exchange. But business goes steadily along and 
seems to be healthily sound. Automobile production is in- 
creasing and unemployment is falling off to some extent. 
Money is fairly easy. The most notable fact is that which 
we have already noted, the tremendous absorption of new 
securities. But it will be noted by the cautious that this 
last week there was a slight decline in prices. A boom 
would not be good at all and would tend to upset things and 
if the steady pace now prevailing holds on till spring, we 
may look for a rapid betterment. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 



COMMERCIAL 



(LATELY THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY) 
SAVINGS 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banksln California 

the Assets of which have never been Increased 

by mergers orconsolidatlonswlth other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1924 

Assets $96,917,170.69 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,000,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 461,746.52 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21if Struts 

PARK-PRESIDICv BRANCH.. ...... ///^//""rdSs^d^E?.! 

" A IGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West F-ortal Ave, and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (4J^) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid Up Capital $20,000,000 $20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

AH Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued, CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES 
THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 
PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

San Francisco Office: 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Asst. Mnnneer 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 
Walter W. Derr, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douglas 2244 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



"The Largest Fire Insurance 
Company in America" 

Fire, Automobile, Windstorm. 
Tourists' Baggage Insurance 
: : REASONABLE RATES 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 
208 Crocker Building (Opposite Palace Hotel) San Francisco 
Phone Kearny 391 




"Mayerle's Eyewater" 

For 30 yearn thi- moot popular Eye Tonic 
for children and nilulto. At druiinUt* ■"<*. I 
by mail 70c. 

George Mayerle, Expert Optician, 960 Market Street | 



SAN FRANCISCO 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 14, 1925 



Bits of Unwritten History 



By Edward S. Spring 



CHAPTED XXIII 
"Double Shotting" the Game 

JOSEPH BERNHARD was one of the most conservative 
members of the old San Francisco Stock and Exchange 
Board. He handled very little commission business. Most 
of his dealings were with brokers who lacked capital, and 
needed money to buy and carry stocks for customers on 
margin. To these brokers, he often loaned much money, 
taking their stocks as collateral and exacting a good rate of 
interest. If the market went down, he called upon them for 
money and the latter called upon their customers, and, if 
the money was not forthcoming, Bernhard could sell oft 
enough stocks to make the account good for himself. Un- 
less there was a bad collapse in the market, he was well 
protected. Another angle of his business, which yielded 
him a good profit, was the loaning of these same stocks to 
short-sellers, who paid him interest for the loan. These 
bears had also to keep up their margins. If they did not, 
Bernhard could buy the stocks in. 

He was, thus, drawing interest on the same securities 
from the commission brokers, who used his capital, and 
from the bears, who borrowed the stocks, and, in other 
words, he was "double-shotting" the game. 

In the early part of 1886, business, on the San Francisco 
Stock and Exchange Board, came to almost a standstill. 
To many people, it looked as if the mining stock market, 
in this city, had come to an end. It has looked so, on numer- 
ous other occasions, but, somehow, it has always man- 
aged to revive again. What made the situation extra 
gloomy at that time, was, that an assessment of 25 cents 
per share, was delinquent on Consolidated California and 
Virginia, and, the next day. the stock was offered at 20 
cents, assessment paid, without takers. 

As the year, 1886, progressed, mysterious manipulation 
appeared in Consolidated California and Virginia and the 
whole market, for Comstocks, took on new life. Specula- 
tion became very active and among those who began to 
deal largely in the north end stocks, was a former million- 
aire, who had lost all his money and was making a fresh 
start. Most of his dealings were in Consolidated Califor- 
nia and Virginia. It was observed, that, whenever he had 
good profits in sight, he sold out and collected the money 
and when he was caught by a sudden drop, he would say 
"Send that stock to Bernhard" and Bernhard would always 
accept the stock and pay for it. 

The ex-millionaire went on collecting such profits as he 
could secure and letting Bernhard stand his losses, while 
the leading stock was having violent fluctuations. The price 
reached $10 per share and Bernhard had a long face. Asked 
by the writer if he was ill, the capitalist said, "I ought to 

be for has loaded me up with $80,000 worth of Con. 

California, at an average, closely up to the top price, and on 
our joint account. He hasn't put up a cent, although he 
has made money through others. If the market breaks 
much, I stand to lose heavily." 

"But," said the writer, "what induced a careful man. like 
you, to speculate on such a 'heads I win, tails you lose' 
proposition?" 

"I don't know," replied Bernhard. "I simply couldn't 
refuse him. Besides, he has been very lucky at times and is 
well connected." That afternoon Con. California dropped 
to $8, and Bernhard's office was notified that it would have 
to pay for 1,000 shares more, bought at $10, that clay, for 
joint account. 



The fall months of 1886 had arrived, and another of 
those old time miracles was being performed in the Corn- 
stock market. A big westerly ore body had been opened, 
on, and above, the 1,650 level of old Con. Virginia ground 
and the leading stock had risen to $65 per share, amid the 
wildest excitement. Over a dozen of the richest and re- 
puted smartest operators and brokers on the street had 
guessed the market wrong and had been caught short and 
several firms failed outright. 

Careful, money-grubbing Joe Bernhard, was a big winner, 
however. He, who never speculated, and dealt only in 
"sure-things" and his partner, in the joint account, divided 
$150,000 profits. Fate occasionally shuffles the cards for a 
new deal and shuffles them in queer ways. 



"Richer and Richer" 

In the fall of 1906, when the excitement in the Goldfield 
stocks was at its height, rich specimens of newly found ore, 
from that district, were daily received in this city. Some 
of this "picture rock," came to a broker who was handling 
the shares of the mine whence it was extracted and he 
displayed it in the front of his office, where it could be seen 
by all who entered. He never passed in, or out, without 
rolling up his eyes at the ore and clasping his hands in 
wonderment at its great value. In the mornings, when 
arriving, he would spend several minutes, handling the 
pieces in rapt admiration. One afternoon, after the broker 
had gone for the day. sign painters were lettering the front 
window^ of the office and dropped some of the gold leaf 
on the floor. This was secured by a young clerk who tore 
the leaf into little pieces, and, using some mucilage, he 
fastened the bright bits to the ore specimens. 

The next morning, the broker, on entering the office went 
as usual to his treasures. On seeing the sparkling little 
patches of gold, he threw up his hands and cried "My Lord ! 
what wonderful ore. It even grows over night — richer 
and richer." 

(To be Continued) 



— They keep on saying that the stock market is due for 
a sharp fall but events do not so far bear out any gloomy 
predictions. Last week there was a move up again. There 
is often a slight relapse in February, but so far this year 
the usual is not occurring and there does not seem to be 
any apparent evidence of even a tendency to relapse, al- 
though some of the present prices would seem to warrant it. 
On the contrary, the unusually high peak is being well 
maintained on the New' York as well as on the local ex- 
change. 



Established 28 Years 



EXTRA HAIR 
COVER THE BOB 



EVENING 



FOR 

WEAR 



NOW BEING SHOWN AT 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

815 Clement Street San Francisco 360 Geary Street 

2331 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley 
MR. AND MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 



GANTNER & MAISON 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel— 771 to 777 Valencia Street, Bet. 18th and 19th Sts., 
San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



February 14, 1925 



AND CALIFORN1 \ \1>\ ERTISER 



17 



Wheat and Chaff 

By Nathaniel Anderson 




Nathaniel Anderson 

FROM the minnow to the whale 
there is something to be said, from 
the fly to the eagle, and the rabbit to 
the lion ; a bill of rights should be writ- 
ten for the whole feeling creation. Su- 
perior mankind with feverish readiness 
has penned his own. It covers his re- 
ligion, the safety of his limbs, freedom 
of his tongue and joy of life. The dumb 
creatures are not able to vent their 
likes and dislikes in strong enough 
terms to reach the sensibilities of their 
masters, where they exist. If the 
animal could speak and write he would 
prove to man a lack of spiritual devel- 
opment in him that would make him 
think he knew so little of life that he 
should either resign the guidance of 
it to his fellow-creatures or open a 
new and better book for a humane 
record. 

Imagine an elephant in a jungle, four 
hundred years old, intelligent enough 
to be the leader of his race, suddenly 
confronted with the "blond beast," gun 
in hand. If he could he would say. 
"\\ e have been to the water-hole to 
drink, but we did not expect to meet 
your kind. If we had known you and 
your camera-men were to be encount- 
ered, another hour would have suited 
our purpose better. But as it is go 
your way, and do not pull the triggers 
of those damnable machines." If he 
said this simple thing, it would en- 
lighten the killer to the realization that 
the elephants must drink to live and 
are a part of a plan, but as the animal's 
chief cannot talk, the man and his men 
have no other imagination hut to shoot 
him down in his home. What would 
the eagle say of his feelings, if lie 
could, when shut up in a two by four 
foot cage? He has looked with fierce 
delight through miles of range, but now 



by some trap of pestiferous man his 

sad eye meets a short level. Chagrin 
is heaped upon him, being continually 
surrounded in his darkened cage b) 
petty curiosity-seekers, who would 
rather see an eagle droop than watch 
him as a thunderbolt cutting the air. I 
would like to hear the miracle just 
once of a lion, in contemptuous rage, 
because he has been annoyed for years, 
tell what he has suffered in nerves and 
humiliation of spirit while being 
plagued to do baby tricks. 

Instead of cheapening our natures by 
goading wild animals for our unnatural 
amusements, we should study with bet- 
ter grace to our kind the necessities of 
light, air and exercise of household 
pets. 

If the recent matricide killed her 
mother because "Jazz" made her do it, 
then the Puritans were right. Dancing 
is bad, and overmuch dancing is "bad- 
der." The thousands of girls, accord- 
ing to this reasoning, who are very 
fond of gaiety, are potential matricides. 
Of course it is not possible for one girl 
to be very much livelier than another 
without being vicious consequentially! 
•If a girl has jazzmania she must be a 
murderess, and it is foolish to think, 
we suppose, that a girl can be so wicked 
that she will kill even her mother who 
interferes with what she likes inordi- 
nately, and that there are other very 
naughty and immoral young ladies who 
would be inclined to kill anybody else 
who breathed an ill word against their 
mothers. 

If Dorothy Ellingson has something 
wrong with her glands, how wrong? 
Does she need more or less? It seems 
if she had more, she might have killed 
her whole family. They all said she 
danced too much. 

line of these days — perhaps in the 
year 9925, or later — we shall have de- 
veloped humanity that accurately meas- 
ures pain and suffering. \ man caught 
under an automobile or several tons of 
rock in a cave can a- effectually draw the 
attention of the world as the Serbian who 
killed the high Russian nobleman. It will 
focus upon him until he is extricate 1 be- 
cause hi- predicament i- apparent and im- 
mediate. Millions bear the hardships of 
life in a spiritual way and the physical 
pain of it. and rarely a linger is lifted for 
them. There is really no difference be- 
tween the man under the weight of fate 
but the length of the trouble each bears. 
* * * 

i \ saj that down in Los A n g e ' es 
the traffic rules are strict. Well, you can't 
cheat a certain class i'i automobilists, who 

are determined to make a good death 
record. It must be for them either num- 
bers 3. In I .os AntT.de- tl 
survivor of one "i these killings is a baby, 
saved by birth because a police surgeon 



at the moment performed a Caesarian 
operation. But the driver, who was :aid 

to he drunk, took his toll in the deaths 
oi the infant's mother, father and eigh- 
teen-months-old brother. 
* * * 

This is the season of the year for a 
trip into the snow country, Within a 
day's travel you will find a score of 
mountain districts which will provide you 
with a real winter panorama. 

This is the time of the year to enjoy 
Mt. Shasta in all its glory and the road 
into the Mt. Lassen district by way of 
Viola is passable unless the attempt to 
negotiate it is made in the rain. Sequoia 
and General Grant National Parks also 
offer attractive winter panoramas for the 
motorist. The whole of the Sierra region 
offers a remarkable treat to the lover of 
nature as now is the height of the win- 
ter in that section. 







N. W. CORNER 
FRANKLIN 2960 POLK AND POST STS. 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 

Wilson Bros. Co. 

Incorporated 
L«S6-N HARKBT 9TRBBT 

llet. I'rnnkHii nml Ghmgal 
Telephone I'nrk -71 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 14, 1925 




PW TtfBL£ 



By KEM 

"... "I am no devourer of novels. I approach them 
with many precautions. For the most part 1 have found Cer- 
vantes and Fielding, Tolstoy and Flaubert, Stendhal and Proust, 
Hardy and Conrad and Regnier enough — sometimes more than 
enough — for me, except when the curiosity of novelty leads me 
to try little known books, or some friend writes a novel in 
which I "lope to find at all events a congenial human document." 

Havelock Ellis. 

The flow of spring fiction is beginning to trickle and the 
flood of it will be here in March and April. Much of it may 
well be "approached with many precautions". Publishers 
are bringing out old favorites — best sellers of the "nineties" 
or early "1900's" under new covers, priced as the new 
novels, and in some cases better than the thin treacle, or 
over-ripe cavaire contents of many of the present favorites. 
Fall fiction is still going strong, especially "The Little 
French Girl" by Anne Douglas Sedgwick, "The Divine 
Lady", and Galsworthy's "White Monkey". The Nobel 
Prize winner, "Autumn", by Reymont, is building up Li- 
brary lists, and the second of the series "Winter" has just 
begun its run ; "Spring" and "Summer" are scheduled for 
April and May; "Peasants", as the series is known, will 
carry most of its readers to the warmth and splendor prom- 
ised by the title of the final number — but already the aver- 
age reader of "best sellers" is beginning to chafe at the big 
human interests of those who live close to nature, and are 
clamoring for Michael Arlen's society suicides or Ben 
Hecht's odoriferous perverted creations ; as one reader 
characteristically put it: "I hate reading about people 
who live close to the soil and eat onions ; give me good old 
United States, and its good eats, grills, fine clothes and 
fast motors." For those wedded to "good old United 
States", Rath has just published "The Brains of the 
Family", Elmer Davis — "The Keys of the City", Alexander 
Black's "Stacey" and Helen Martin's "Challenged"; the 
great outdoors is spread before us by Zane Grey in "The 
Thundering Herd", Clarence Mulford's "Cottonwood 
Gulch", and B. M. Bower in "Desert Brew". Oppenheimer, 
the writer who knows how to take his reader where Lon- 
don "good eats" are to be found, comes out in a new-old 
book "The Inevitable Millionaires" ; Philip Gibbs in another 
new-old one — "The Individualist", and for those who revel 
in the mysterious comes J. S. Fletcher's "Wolves and the 
Lamb", Herman Landon's "Gray Magic"; and Francis 
Beeding's "The Seven Sleepers", which deals with an inter- 
national horrific problem. Historical novels are read in 
increasing numbers, old and new of Sabatini's being in de- 
mand from "Scaramouche", to "The Strolling Saint", Bar- 
oness Orczy's "Pimpernel and Rosemary", and George 
Gibbs' "Love of M'Sieur". For those who are not "de- 
vourers of novels" Harry A. Franck's "Wandering in 
Northern China", George Moore's highly colored "Conver- 
sations in Ebury Street", or Harvey O. Higgins' "The 
American Mind in Action", furnish interest; lovers of de- 
lightful, worth-while literary food — Professor Sherman's 
"My Dear Cornelia"; and for any athirst for "A Philosophy 
of Living", they are assured they will find it in : 

"Impressions and Comments" by Havelock Ellis. H. L. 
Mencken tells us "Havelock Ellis is undoubtedly the most 
civilized Englishman living today. His books take the 
reader into the company of one whose mind is a rich li- 
brary. His style is as transparent as a crystal, and yet it 
is full of fine colors and cadence. The extent of his know- 
ledge is appalling, yet it has not dulled his sensitiveness to 



beauty nor his capacity to evolve it." Dipping into "Im- 
pressions and Comments" the reader finds many arresting 
paragraphs, such as the following: 

"How is religion still possible? This question is posed 
by so able a thinker as Dr. Merz. . . . How is walk- 
ing still possible? . . . How is hunger still possible? 
Religion if anything at all, must be a natural or- 
ganic function, like walking, eating ; better still, one might 
say, like loving. . . . Religion, like love, develops and 
harmonizes our rarest and most extravagant emotions. It 
exalts us above the commonplace routine of our daily lite, 
and it makes us supreme over the world. But, like love 
also, it is a little ridiculous to those who are unable to ex- 
perience it." 

Houghton, Mifflin; $3.00. 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

*'PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 

239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



Make yourself at home at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tillmann Place, at 241 Grant Ave. 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Rare Books — First Editions — Fine Bindings 

Importations from Zachnsdorf. Root, Morrell, etc., of London 

Commissions in London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

Phone Kearny 5816 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacture™ of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS, FLUMES, 

PENSTOCKS, GASHOLDERS, SMOKE STACKS, ETC. 

San Francisco, Calif. Los Angeles, Calif. 

444 Market St. 57 1 7 Santa Fe Avenue 



Be Photographed This Year on Your Birthday 



STUDIOS IN ALL 

PRINCIPAL CITIES OF 

CALIFORNIA 



Oakland 

408 Mth Street 

San Franclnco 

41 Grant Avenue 




St. Mary's Academy 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 



For particulars address 
SISTER SUPERIOR 



Select Boarding and Day School Under the 
Direction of the Sisters of St. Dominic 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Sulta Pressed Ily Hnnd Only — Suits Called For and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

PARISIAN DYEING AND CLEANING 
521 Post Street San Francisco 

In Virginia Hotel Phone Franklin 2510 




-the better it gets* 






GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6664 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 

I.SOO.OOO flips were served at the Pan- 
ama Pacific International Exposition 



Have Your Car 

DUCO 

ENAMELED 

Our System Will Give a 
Permanent Luster 

Does Not Fade Nor Crack 
This We Guarantee 

See Our Demonstration Car 

Everluster Auto Enameling Co. 
946 Bush Street Franklin 2775 




H lontlnui d fi ' 

"Pageant of Youth" 

There will be no men in heavenl 

There will lie no women in hell ! 

At least such will be the case in the 
"Pageant of Youth," allegorical musical 
masque to lie produced with 1,000 play- 
ers and a symphony orchestra the week 
of .March M) in the San Francisco Civic 
Auditorium. The pageant is sponsored 
by friends of St. Ignatius College ami 
will he given in behalf of that famous 
Catholic educational institution. 

Scene 1 is enacted upon the battle- 
ments of heaven. None but women ap- 
pear in the heavenly roles. 

Then the scene changes to hell, with 
the Spirit of Evil and his demons por- 
trayed exclusively by men. 

Many magnificent stage pictures are 
presented during the course of the mas- 
que, color and life being supplied by 
groups of dancers, angels, demons, stu- 
dents, knights and slaves. Daily re- 
hearsals for the dancing groups are be- 
ing held in a score of Catholic schools 
and colleges in the Bay region. Princi- 
pals are being rehearsed each night at 
the auditorium or in its adjoining halls. 



We are a prodigal crowd hereabout : 
Superintendent of Schools Gwinn, two 
weeks ago, returned from an educa- 
tional convention in Chicago, and he's 
going to another in the East in a 
month or so. If the public really knew 
what the initiated know of these school 
conventions, auditors' conventions, 
assessors' conventions, et al., there'd 
be a call to arms to injunct the City 
Treasurer from payment of tax money 
for these convivial picnickings at pub- 
lic expense. They are heirlooms of an 
obsolete spoils system, and the com- 
munity should utter its disapproval of 
furnishing the money therefor to the 
gadabout officials attending them. 



Senator Ball's bill to raise the pay of 
Congressmen from $7,500 to S12.000 is 
a laudable one. Trough fillings and 
hokum distribution have soared simul- 
taneously with other commodities 
the lads are now subjected to greater 
expense than formerly in putting 
themselves over on the voters. So, 
justice being justice, we must lie tol- 
erant and equable; army generals who 
are mostly prototypical of the scrip- 
tural allusion in that "they smelleth 
the battle from afar." principally, are 
"retired" on fabulous pen-ions and 
thereafter put on the junketing pre- 
ferred ICt ; so why not a wee hit more 
waste in the tax money? The American 
people are broadbacked, and liberally 
live up to their characterization by the 
astute Barnum. 



HERE IS 
A FIRM 



zvhich means lots to the automobile 
owners. Foi a small monthly pay- 
ment they lok\- all your automobile 
iconics azvay from you. 

Your ear is kept in first-class mechani- 
cal condition. It's greased and oiled. 
It's towed in San Francisco free of 
charge. Replacement of parts up to 
$50 free, in case of damage by col- 
lision. 10 per cent discount on oils and 
greases and gasoline. Automobiles 
washed for $1.50. And other features. 

Investigate, or phone for 
representative 



Tel. Prospect 6979 

H. & S. 

GARAGE 

639 Turk Street 
San Francisco, Calif. 




T N h aL PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satis fac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or sta- 
er to show 
samples. 



Hrt.U'.lhH"l£iJHiHl ^° n s < ; 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
41 First Street, San Francisco 



Mail Advertising 
Specialists 

ACCURATE AND PROMPT 
SERVICE 

Andrews-Breeding Company 

Sutler l>22 1 

Room 801 Gillette Building 

830 MARKET STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 







Fast Service 

To SACRAMENTO 

— only 3 hours, 15 minutes this way 

Take advantage of this comfortable, convenient 
daily service to Sacramento — via Oakland, Rich- 
mond and Benicia. 

Morning 

Lv. San Francisco (Ferry) Ar. Sacramento 

7:40 a.m. "Sacramento Special" 10:55 a.m. 

Evening 

5:00 p.m. The "El Dorado" 8:15 p.m. 

(Smoker, coaches. Southern Pacific dining car, 
observation car- ) 

"I M_olher trains daily— including the famous 
JLU "NEWSBOY" which leaves San Francisco at 
1:20 a. m. and arrives Sacramento at 7:00 a. m. 
(Sacramento sleeper open for occupancy 9:00 p. m. 
(Oakland Pier) 

Similar comfortable, convenient service returning. 
For further information, ask 

Southern Pacific 



$3.52 

roundtrip lo Sacra- 
mento; go Sunday 
— return not later 
than 6:55 a.m. train 
Monday. 

$4.35 

roundtrip to Sacra- 
ment; go Saturday 
or Sunday ; return 
not later than 6:55 
a. m. train Tuesday. 



Ferry Station 



65 Geary Street 
Sutter 4000 



Third St. Station 



Golden Gate Ferry Company 

FOOT OF HYDE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
WINTER SCHEDULE 

TIME TABLE 

EFFECTIVE OCTOBER 15, 1924 



Leave Sausalito 



A.M. 

6:00 

6:30 

7.00 

7:30 

8:00 

8:30 

9:00 

9:30 

10:00 

10:30 

11:00 

11:30 

12:00 



P.M. 
12:30 
1:00 
1:30 
2:00 
3:00 
4:00 
4:30 
5:00 
5:30 
6:00 
6:30 
7:00 
7:30 
8:0( 
8:30 
9:00 
9:30 
10:30 
11:30 



Leav 

( 

A.M. 

6:30 

7:00 

7:30 

8:00 

8:30 

9:00 

9:30 

10:00 

10:30 

11:00 

11:30 

12:00 



San Francisco 
Hyde Street) 

P.M. 
12:30 



:00 

:30 

:00 

:30 

:30 

:30 

.00 

:30 

6:00 

6:30 

7:00 

7:30 

8:00 

8:30 

9:00 

9:30 

10:00 

11:00 

12:00 



Special Service When Traffic Requirements 



Make Necessary. 



Golden Gate Ferry Company 






t 
Olden Days in 



I 



San Francisco 



Many People 
of Prominence 



are pictured "Everywhere,' even '.\( the Altar"; Zi iig- 
feld's must beautiful "Folly" is "shot" for your benefit; 
there are some "Freaks of the Insect World." interest- 
ing "People and Events." and a del ghtful front page, 
"Celestial Charmers of Chinatown." Don't miss the 



Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 



are shown in a delightful page. "The San Francisco of 
Our Fathers." which pictures this city in the 90s; there 
are also action pictures showing some of the members 
of the "Campfire Girls of San Francisco" who are ath- 
letically inclined. 



_P _™ _■■_■ _"_™ 



m K U™ , ^™'« 



Take Advantage of These 

Tremendous 
Possibilities 

The Taxicah business has made millions for its owners in 
Eastern cities. It is only in its infancy here, with unlimited 
opportunities for greatly increased profits. There is only 1 
cah for ever> 20(10 people in San Francisco; Chicago has 1 
for every 2000. and New York 6. Make your money grow. 
Become a part owner in 

Checker Cab Co. 

of San Francisco 

\\ e wanl everyone to he a booster for us. You ma> buy one 
or more shares of our slock at this lime at (10.00 a share. 
llpon completion of this financing, application will he made 
to list this slock on the San Francisco Exchange. Mail the 
coupon w ithoiit delay. 



"Ride in ! •■■ *. baldi, Prcsinem 

Y— . j Checker <nh Co. 

OUT OWII \ 1 * i ' Ir * California SI., San Frnncl*co. 

g~^ | j [ ] I am Interested. Please send t'uli 

UaD details. 

d [ ] Please reserve Cor me shares 
f*3V | of ytoek at $10 n share. 

Yourselr I "— 

rofit" 

« \-|.- '-I l-?5 

«■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 









UJL 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856 



STATE 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



California Advertiser 

SAN FRANCISCO SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1925 



$5.00 PER YEAR 



LOS ANGELES 



•OUESEllblR& 

~taSiTRAIGHTJi '" 





UCH infinite refinement throughout makes 
the 'JDuesenberg straight-eight the most 
distinguished motor car in America <— , 



DUESENBERG AUTOMOBILE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA 
LLOYD S. JOHNSON, Distributor • 1930 VAN NESS AVENUE 

SAN FRANCISCO 




One Year Jree (juarantee! 



r 



The Coach 

$1075 

Balloon Tires 

f.O.b. Lansing 
Tax and Sparc Tire Extra 




FISHER 



Oakland — 
CALIFORNIA AUTO 
SALES CO. 
E. BERGER, Manager 
Twelfth and Harrison Streets 
29th Ave. and East 14th St. 
Telephone LAKESIDE 1558 



WE SO thoroughly believe in this six- 
cylinder OLDSMOBILE that we will 
give you, IN WRITING, a full YEAR'S 
GUARANTEE that will protect you and take all 
the guesswork out of your automobile budget for 
the coming year. Ask us about this wonderful 
proposition and how we can give it to you FREE. 

You've got to pay hundreds of dollars more to get 
comparable quality elsewhere — and you have to 
sacrifice so much if you pay less than $1075 for a 
coach. That's why thousands upon thousands are 
buying this Oldsmobile! 

By all means — see this coach (and Oldsmobile's 
other distinctive body types) at the Auto Show! 

J. W. LE AVITT & CO. 

Van Ness at Sacramento Telephone Graystone 480 

Open Sundays and Evenings 



OLDSMOBILE Six 

PRODUCT OF GENERAL MOTORS 




EfUbtUTicd July SO. l»3d 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20. 1S56, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott. 

Jr.. from 1884 to 1925, Is now printed and published by Frederick Alfred Marriott. 235 Montgomery St., San Francisco, California. Telephone 

Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco. California, Post Office as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C. London, 

England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year, $5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 



Vol. CVI 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, FEBRUARY, 21, 1925 



No. 8 



£> 



HE NINTH ANNUAL PACIFIC AUTOMOBILE SHOW, which is daily at- 
tracting thousands of out of town people to San Francisco, continues this season 
as in years past, to win for this city the distinction of having the most beauti- 
ful automobile exhibit in the country. 

The Show this year is as much a social event as it is a business affair. Morn- 
ings and afternoons, perhaps, belong more to the trade and less to the public, 
but with the evening hours the Auditorium Auto Show is the drawing card 
that attracts the city's four hundred and their thousands of followers. 
Perhaps nowhere else in the world is there a finer class of Automobile Show 
crowds than are to be found in our own San Francisco. Close students of 
crowds who have visited the display, year after year, have noted this fact and 
commented on it. 

This season, more than ever, it is expected that the evenings will attract the 
women folk, the socially elect, those who are always in the forefront at every 
San Francisco gala event. And there is much to interest them at this year's 
display from a strictly automotive standpoint. There are new models in abund- 
ance, with a decided preponderance of closed cars; new motor types, with 
the Eight-in-line motors, leaving perhaps in popular interest because of their 
newness; new effects in two-tone paint jobs and many niceties in appointment 
that will appeal to the women folk. 

Yes, the show is well worth the seeing, and it is confidently expected that it 
will attract a record breaking attendance during the coming week. The fact 
that Creatore, of New York, has been secured as guest conductor of the fifty- 
piece band, is also an assurance that the music, afternoons and evenings, will 
be especially delightful. 



I ,.}R ;» l l JUIW II Il J 1 1 1 V. H\K .'llti.'li m i^lllk 




GEORGE WAHLGREEN » """"" » """ ^""^ 

The San Francisco Exposition Auditorium, which has been transformed into a magnificent 

reproduction «t Old Tenice. In this setting will be shown the latest and newest 1925 

automobile models. Insets show G. J. Wahlgreen (left), and Giuseppe 

Creatore (right), conductor of the fifty-piece band. 



GIUSEPPE CREATORE 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 21, 1925 




Pleasure's Ww 




OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ 16m Moore. 




By Katherine Schwartz 
Formerly of the "Chicago Tribune" 



S. F. Symphony 

IF ONE were choosing a solo instrument for a parlor en- 
tert linment, he would hardly choose the bass viol, but 
as we go through life and learn to admire honest effort and 
eminent achievement, we may be forgiven if we sacrifice 
somewhat of real beauty for such an achievement on the 
most difficult and least appreciated of instruments. 

Waldemar Giese playing with Louis Persinger, — who 
has been so eminently and fittingly praised in these 
columns so often that he needs no further recommend- 
ation, — showed us this achievement in the Concerto for 
Violin and Double Bass by Bottesini at the Curran Theater 
Sunday. 

His harmonics and arpeggios were executed in the most 
skillful and artistic manner, both for tonal qualities and 
bowing. 

Two movements from the ever popular Haydn Surprise 
Symphony were played to the great delight of the audience. 
A new number at these concerts was "Zorahayda" by 
Svendsen. If this is a sample of the modern Norwegian 
school, let us hope we may have much more of these beauti- 
ful works. The rest of the popular concert consisted of 
"Serenade" by Pierne, "The Bee" by Schubert, and "Invi- 
tation to the Dance" by Weber-Weingartner, and the Suite 
by Grieg. 



Wilkes 

Kolb and Dill in their offering "Politics" are still crowd- 
ing 'em into the Wilkes. The coming week will be the 
last one of their present engagement. 

Ernie Ball and some very pretty girls present some of 
Mr. Ball's old and well loved ballads, as well as some new 
ones. 

Kolb and Dill have surrounded themselves with a splen- 
did cast one of the chief of these is Edward O'Brien, 
well known picture luminary. He has been seen in charac- 
ter parts with such well known favorites as Tom Mix, Louise 
Lovely, Dan Mason, Ralph Stewart and others. In fact it 
was on the lot at Hollywood where he was working in a 
Tom Mix picture that Kolb and Dill secured him for this 
engagement. O'Brien does a fine piece of characterization 
as the village poohbah, Ike Winslow, where he performs all 
the functions necessary to a well regulated village. He is 
station master, fireman, policeman, and electioneer, just 
as the occasion requires, and provokes much mirth in the 
role. 



Roland Hayes 

So great has the demand for seats been for the recital by 
Roland Hayes, heralded as a world figure in the musical 
world, that extra seats have been prepared on the stage. 

This negro tenor was born in Curryville, Georgia, on a 
small farm owned by his mother, an ex-slave. Despite pov- 
erty and great hardships he managed to educate himself, 
and managed to reach London with scarcely enough money 
to give a recital. After this recital, the attention of all 
England was focused upon him. Then he came under the 
baton of Gabriel Pierne, the noted Parisian conductor, and 
soon all Paris was talking about him. After conquests in 



every part of Europe, he returned to America last season, 
and no singer in years has had such receptions accorded 
him everywhere. He has made his way simply by the 
sheer beauty of his voice, which is matchless, and has 
absolute command of phrase and style, and vivid emotional 
illusion. 



Cameo 

At the Cameo next week will be seen "Barbara Frietchie" 
with Florence and Edmund Lowe. This is a sweet romance 
in American history, soul-stirring in its beauty, and the 
intensity of its dramatic situations. A very fitting musical 
program has been arranged with Gladys Salisbury at the 
console, assisted by the Cameo melodists. 



Strand and Union Square Theaters 

Opening programs inaugurating the new policies of the 
Strand and the Union Square theaters (now the Hippo- 
drome) become effective today. 

Under the new policy, vaudeville booked for the Hippo- 
drome, will be at the Strand in connection with a first run 
feature production. The Union Square will also be a first 
run picture house with stage presentations and select 
orchestral offerings by Walter Rudolph and his men. 

The Strand's opening program will be headed by Tom 
Mix in his latest thriller "Teeth" and introduces a new 
dog star, "Duke", to the public. Heading the vaudeville 
bill will be "Indian Follies" — real Indians, — Al Sweet's 
Singing Hussar Band, Joe Devlin in "Musical Moments" 
and the Depford Sisters trio, equilibrists. 

The feature at the Union Square will be "The Narrow 
Street". In connection with the stage presentation will be 
seen Elfrieda Wynne, Hazel Stallings and Jean Singer. 



Loew's Warfield 

"Excuse Me", one of the outstanding farces written by 
Rupert Hughes and which toured the country for many 
years with phenomenal success, is the latest booking for 
Loew's Warfield, beginning next Saturday. 

"Excuse Me", in its newest screen form, is proving even 
a greater laugh riot than the stage version ever was — 
records being shattered in many cities where it has been 
shown. 

It is a story of a group of interesting people aboard a 
Pullman train coming from Chicago to San Francisco. 
Interest centers around a young man bound for the Orient 
and a girl who elopes with him. Norma Shearer and Con- 
rad Nagel have the parts of the couple who have such a 
hard time getting wed. Walter Hiers is the porter who 
is continually muddling things up and provoking a lot of 
fun. Renee Adoree plays the role of the former French 
sweetheart of the groom. Bert Roach is the human tank 
aboard, while clever characterizations are also given by 
Wm. V. Mong and Edithe Yorke. 

Max Bradfield and his syncopaters will be a part of the 
Fanchon and Marco "Radio Ideas" to be staged as part of 
this program. "Smiling" Jimmy Kessel, well known singer 
for KFRC ; "Big" Brother and several others from KPO 
and the KLX Hawaiians from across the bay will do their 
turns just as you've heard them on the air. 



February 21, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Amusements 

MCXT WEEK 



ALCAZAR 

O'Farrell nr. Powell 



"So This Is 
London'" 



ALEXANDRIA 
18th and Geary 



Pictures 



CALIFORNIA 

4th and Market 



"Forty Winks" 



CAMEO 
936 Market St. 



'Barbara Frietchie' 



CAPITOL 

64 Ellis St. 



'White Collars" 



BEATTY'S 
CASINO 

Ellis and Mason 



"The Clean 
Heart" 

and Vaudeville 



CASTRO 



Pictures 



NEW 

COLUMBIA 
Eddy and Mason 



Otis Skinner 

'Sancho Panza' 



CURRAN 
Geary, Nr. Mason 



Pnuline Frederick 

"The Lady" 



GRANADA 

1066 Market St. 



"Rose of Paris" 



GOLDEN GATE 
G. G. Ave. and Taylor 



Vaudeville and 
Pictures 



IMPERIAL 
1077 Market St. 



'The Golden Bed" 



LOEWS 
WARFIELD 
988 Market St. 



'Excuse Me" 



METROPOLITAN 

2055 Union St. 



Pictures 



NEW FILLMORE 
NEW MISSION 



Pictures 



ORPHEUM 
O'Farrell and Powell 



Vaudeville 



PANTAGES 
Market at Mason 



Vaudeville 
Pictures 



PORTOLA 



Pictures 

ProRTnin Chnnpeil 

Dally 



ROYAL 

1529 Polk St. 



Pictures 



STRAND 

965 Market St. 



Pictures and 
Vaudeville 



UNION 

SQUARE 

(Hippodrome) 



Pictures 



WILKES 

I Formerly Geary) 

Geary and Mason 



Kolb and Dill 

in 

"Politics" 



WIGWAM 



Pictures 



Granada 

Next week is "Pep Week" at the 
Granada. Peppy features, peppy news 
views, peppy music, a peppy stage in- 
novation and a peppy comedy will pro- 
vide entertainment. 

The feature is "Rose of Paris" in 
which Mary Philbin and an excellent 
supporting' cast appear. Harry Lang- 
don will be seen in a comedy called 
"Boobs in the Woods", said to be a 
scream. 

Paul Ash and his synco-sympho- 
nists have a program made of the live- 
liest tunes of the clay, each one full of 
pep. Iris Ethel Vining at the organ 
has a peppery solo. 



California 

"Forty Winks" Paramounts pictur- 
ization of the popular stage success, 
"Lord Chumley", by David Belasco 
and Henry C. De Mille, opens at the 
California this week with Max Dolin's 
first anniversary program. At the re- 
quest of patrons he has chosen to play 
"Kammenoi Ostro" as his main selec- 
tion for the week. 



Curran 

This will be the last opportunity 
San Franciscans will have to see Pau- 
line Frederick for some time, as im- 
mediately at the close of her two 
weeks' engagement here she is leaving 
for Australia, where she will open very 
soon in either "Spring Cleaning" or 
"The Lady", which of these has not 
yet been decided. 

"The Lady", based upon the theme 
of mother love, is splendidly acted, and 
Louis Macloon has given this city a 
splendid presentation with a strong 
supporting cast for the star. 



Dale Stock Company at Players 

Beginning on Sunday evening, 
March 22, the Dale Stock Company 
will open at the Players Theater. 1757 
Bush Street, in "Pollyanna", followed 
by such plays as "Bought and Paid 
For" and "Ming Toy". 

The company will include Lucille 
Schumann. Mortimer Snow and many 
others known in the bay region. Snow 
will be remembered as an old time 
matinee idol who won the hearts of the 
flappers way back in 1892 at the old 
Grove and Alcazar Theaters. 



Imperial 

Cecil De Mille's daring production 
of "The Golden Bed" is playing to 
crowded houses at the Imperial and 
will continue next week. Hundreds 01 
pounds of candy were used in the fa- 
mous "candy ball". Noted for his 
colorful scenes. De Mille has surpassed 
himself in this new novelty from Jean- 
nie Macpherson's screen play adapted 
from Wallace Irwin's famous novel. 
(Continued on Pap> 



Concerts 



Curran Theater 

Nil n Francisco Symphony, Sunday. February 
'2'2. 2:45 p. in.. Waller Ferner 3 Celllat. 
SoUUt. 



Beatty's Casino 



Sunday Afternoon, 1-Vliriuiry 22, 2:ir> ]i. 
Itolmid Hay cm, Negro Tenor. 



NINTH 
ANNUAL 

AUTO 

SHOW 

Exposition Auditorium 
San Francisco 

FEBRUARY 

21st to 28th 
1925 

oAuspices 

MOTOR CAR DEALERS 
ASSOCIATION 

of San Francisco 
G. A. WAHLGREEN 

SManager 



Machines are now in use which 
wrap 1,500 loaves of bread an hour, 
sealing them in waxed paper without 
their being touched by human hands. 



^ fc you pay no moreyg 




TfcsVbtoe o/a Thousand Gardens' 

224426 Giant Avr Tel. Kearny 4975 




HARRY DIXON 

IXTERPRETS 

YOUR IDEAS 

IX METAL 



241 GRANT AVE. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 21, 1925 






By Antoinette Arnold 



Pre-Lenten Festivities 

LUNCHEONS, teas, dinners, dances, fill to the brim 
society's calendar during- the few remaining days pre- 
ceding Lent. Ash Wednesday is February Twenty-fifth. 
Easter Sunday, in the year of Nineteen Hundred and 
Twenty-five, comes on April Twelfth. 

Religious observances are followed by society folks, more 
closely than those who doubt, give proper credence. But 
it is so ! While of course there are social events of more 
or less informality, individual inclination is always para- 
mount, and church-going customs are certainly followed. 
Lent is universally observed, and seldom are there any 
large social functions during the forty days of Lent. 

The rush. now. is to crowd into the hours that are left as 
many festivities as the engagement book will permit. Mater 
and daughters, alike are perplexed with the social quandary. 
Invitations are gracious compliments, and in order to at- 
tribute to each a full measure of appreciation, some defi- 
nite thinking must take place. 

It is not unusual for society, meaning the collective and 
individual status, to accept invitations for one day which 
include a luncheon, a tea, a dinner-dance and an elaborate 
banquet. 

Keeping faith one with another in presenting formal in- 
vitations has become one of those unwritten courtesies 
which are most carefully scheduled ; and so well arranged, 
that they amaze long-timed business men who know and 
tabulate each given day with its measured minutes and 
hours. 

Weddings, anniversaries, birthday celebrations — take un- 
questioned precedence in the social calendar, while the 
theater attractions or the opera, or some big visiting celeb- 
rity, always seem to have a premeditated place in the calen- 
dars of Society. 

As one man tersely said : "It takes head-work." 

So it does, but it takes more; it takes consideration, and 
graciousness, and that matchless quality we call tact. 

* * * 
Wedding of Miss Grant 

Society is still discussing the exquisite Grant-Magee 
wedding which took place February 11, at the home of 
the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph D. Grant, in 
Broadway. 

Miss Edith Grant, the lovely bride, and Mr. William A. 
Magee Jr., the groom, have both been social favorites in 
San Francisco and its adjacent cities. Mr. Magee is the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. William A. Magee of Alder Farm. 
Fruitvale. The marriage of Miss Grant and Mr. Magee 
united two of California's best known families, and will 
long be remembered as one of the most beautiful of all the 
city's distinguished wedding ceremonies. Rev. Walter 
Cambridge, rector of St. Matthews Episcopal Church, San 
Mateo, read the marriage ceremony. 

The bride, who was given in marriage by her father, was 
a picture in her robe of ivory satin and point de Venise lace. 

COLONIAL HOTEL 

0.10 Uuxh Slreet, Between Povrcll and Stockton. Snn Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



The lace bodice was finished with a round neck and had 
long lace sleeves. The skirt was of satin, the only trim- 
ming being a bow of satin ribbon at one side. The bridal 
veil was of tulle, attached to a cap of point de Venise lace, 
and completely covered the court train of satin, fastened 
to the gown with insets of lace. A wreath of orange blos- 
soms adorned her hair and she carried a shower bouquet 
of white orchids. 

Miss Josephine Grant was her sister's maid of honor. 
The bridesmaids were Miss Mary Martin, Miss Elizabeth 
Magee. Miss Marianne Kuhn, Miss Katherine Kuhn, Miss 
Alice Moffitt, Miss Mary Emma Flood, Miss Leonore 
Armsby and Miss Evelyn Poett. 

The attendants were dressed alike in frocks of rose pink 
chiffon, fashioned with the long bodice over petaled skirts. 
The necks were round and the frocks sleeveless. The only 
trimming, a cluster of pink velvet roses at the shoulder, 
which matched the wreath of velvet roses worn in the hair. 
With the exception of the maid of honor, who carried a 
shower of mauve and pink orchids, the attendants carried 
old-fashioned bouquets of pink and blue flowers, tied with 
blue velvet ribbon. 

* * * 

Mrs. William A. Magee was gowned in gray lace, with 
a gray lace picture hat to match. 

Mrs. Joseph D. Grant wore a taupe lace gown and a 
large brown hat. 

Mr. Harry Hush Magee was his brother's best man. 

The ushers were Mr. James Moffitt, Mr. Guy C. Earl 
of Los Angeles, Mr. Kenneth Walsh, Mr. Tallant Tubbs, 
Mr. Charles Stetson Wheeler Jr., Mr. Leon Brooks Walker 
Jr., Mr. Herbert Tietsen, Mr. John Okell, Mr. George Mont- 
gomery and Mr. Walter Hush. 

Mr. Rudy Seiger and his Fairmont Orchestra played at 
the wedding and during the wedding reception and break- 
fast. Mr. Kajetan Attl played the harp. 

The entire house was decorated in a scheme of pink 
coloring, spring flowers of all descriptions intermingled 
with fruit blossoms. 

Covers were placed for thirty at the bride's table. Those 
other than the bridal party were Mr. and Mrs. Coy Filmer, 
Mrs. Kenneth Walsh, Mrs. Bliss Rucker, Mrs. Russell Wil- 
son, Miss Isabel Rockefeller and Miss Margaret Flint of 
New York. 

Mr. and Mrs. Magee left for a honeymoon tour of Europe, 
from which they will return about June or July. In the 
meantime, building is progressing on the home which Mr. 
and Mrs. Grant are giving them, adjoining the old Grant 
home in Burlingame. 

* * * 

At Women's Athletic Club 

Mrs. Dent Hayes Robert was hostess at a dinner Satur- 
day evening, February 7, at the Women's Athletic Club, 
where Mrs. Robert has been spending the winter. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 

401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter 0130 Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



February 21, 1925 



WD CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Guests of honor were Mr. and Mrs. William 
T. Sesnon, who left Sunday with Miss Bar- 
bara Sesnon and Miss Doris Fagan for New 
York and the West Indies, making the trip by 
way of New Orleans. Mrs. Robert's guests 
included Mr. and Mrs. Sesnon, Commander 
and Mrs. Kirby Crittenden, Mr. and Mrs. Mil- 
ton Esberg, Mr. and Mrs. Uda Waldrop, Mr. 
and Mrs. Austin Sperry, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
F. Bulotti, Mr. and Mrs. Maxwell Thompson, 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Moore and Mr. Louis 
Forster. 

* * * 

Sir Prince and Lady Prince-Smith, accom- 
panied by Miss Prince-Smith, have been at 
the Fairmont for the last fortnight. 



Mrs. Charles A. Hanna, accompanied by 
Miss Betty Hanna, of Montclair, N. J., who 
have been here for several weeks, have gone 
to Pasadena for the winter. 




HOTEL CANTHItlHIKI 
750 SuUer Strict 

San Francisco's Finest 

Family Hotel 

250 Rooms 

Rates: From $2.50 per day 



Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Wells of Chicago are making an ex- 
tended visit in San Francisco and are at the Fairmont. 
Wells is vice-president of the Santa Fe Railway. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Guthrie and their daughters of 
London are at the Fairmont for the winter. 
Honor of Engagement * * * 

One of the interesting affairs recently was the tea at 
which Miss Charlotte Newman presided as hostess on 
Saturday afternoon, the affair being given in Laurel court 
at the Fairmont Hotel in honor of the announcement of her 
engagement to Leo A. Vauhan. A large heart of roses in 
the center of the oval tea table, from which white satin 
ribbons extended to each guest brought the announcement 
to the group about the table. Miss Newman is a graduate 

of Notre Dame and a teacher in the schools at Sonoma. 

* * ^ 

Are Guests of Honor 

One delightful affair of last week was the reception given 
by Mr. and Mrs. James King Steele at their home on Val- 
lejo street, in honor of Mine. Tamaki Miura. Japanese prima 
donna, and Mrs. T. KomatSU, wife of the resident manager 
of the Japanese steamship line. 

Mine. Miura, as is her custom on such occasions, wore 
the native costume of a Japanese lady, a lovely kimono of 
pearl gray brocade embroidered and painted in an unusual 
and very artistic way. 

Mrs. Frank Freyer. wife of Captain Freyer, U. S. X., 
was a picture, being the Castilian type of Spanish beauty. 
She is tall ami carries herself with queenly grace. Her 
height was accentuated by an immense comb of carved tor- 
toise shell. Her gown was gold and black lace. Mrs. 
Freyer presided at one end of the table and Mrs. George 
McGowan at the other. The latter was gowned in rust- 
brown lace and chiffon, with a large bouquet of gardenias 
on the shoulder There were several hundred guests, many 
being army and navy officers and their wives, and the for- 
eign consuls and their wives. 

* * * 

As Horn Blower, Presidio Has Rival for Gabriel 

Members of the 30th Infantry. "San Francisco's I )wn" regi- 
ment, are grooming a candidate for one ^i these "end of the 



To Europe --Norway Cruises-- South America 
West Indies 

ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET COMPANY 

'■'I'lir Ooinfttrl HiMlU*'* 

.-.TO MARKET sTUF.l'.T. s\\ FRANCIS! 

1'hont' Sillier MS3 



world" exhibitions, for ihey claim thai they have 
a bugler at the Presidio who can outblast Angel 
i labriel himself. Furthermore, they say thai he 

ha- a religious and royal background, since he 
was horn at Granada, Spain, in the shadow of the 

famous Alhambra M 'ish palace and mosque. 

Me was first adopted by the American army as 
a refugee in the Philippines in lSOS at the age 
id' 12 years. At that time he was mascot for 
Company "L," 18th Infantry. 

Gabriel Rodgers happens to he the cognomen 
bestowed upon the young Spaniard by his rescu- 
ers, and the men of his regiment claim that (here 
was something supernatural about giving him 
that name of "Gabriel" even at sucn an earlv 
age. 

* * * 

Miss Ethel Cooper entertained at the Fairmont 
recently for Signora Maceferri, a delightful Ital- 
ian countess who is here for a few days. Mme. 
Maceferri's home was formerly in Pasadena and 
she is a Californian by birth. 

The Italian green and red and white prevailed 
in the decorations, and the place cards and favors 
and Imn bens from Italy imparted a highly attrac'ive aspect 
to three tables seating the guests. Some of the friends of the 
hostess to meet the visitor were : 

MESDAMES 

Rudolph Spreckels 
Osgood Hooker 
Lorenzo Avenali 
Charles Henderson 
Fentress Hill 
George Bowles 
Arthur Lord 
George Lent 



Charles Mcintosh 
James A. Cooper 
William S. Porter 
George Mendell 
Georges de Latour 
Walker Kamm 
T. Dantorth Boardman 
Edwin Eddy 
Selah Chamberlain 



Tiny O' Connor 
Florence Easton 



MISSES 

Marjorie Josselyn 
Jennie Blair 
Frances Joliffe 



Mr. and Mrs. Carlo Morbio were hosts at a Sunday evening 
musicale and supper at their home at St. Francis Wood. The 
evening was in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth C. Beaton an 1 
the hitter's sister. Miss Mona Wood of Los Angeles. 

Il was a delightful evening of music and a reading of orig- 
inal poems. Edmund Vance Cook, the noted American poet, 
read a poem in Lincoln. Mrs. Fenwicke Holmes also read 
original poems. 

Mrs. Beaton and Miss Wood sang duets, the two sisters 
singing delightfully. Their voices, one soprano and the other 
contralto, are pleasing. Mrs. Morbio, who is a non-profes- 
sional artist, sang a group of songs as did Dr. F. S. Warford. 
Mrs. Cecil Mollis St' inc. Airs. Parker Steward, Mrs. George 
Martyn and Frederick Biggerstaff were also on the musical 

program. 

* * * 

Mrs. Gaillard Stoney had some friends at a tea Sunday 
afternoon to meet Mme. Tamaki Miura. the visiting Japanese 
prima donna, for whom several o.her affairs were given this 
week. 
. , 

( Social and Business Engraving \ 

Personal Service Given - Orders Called For 
' at your Home or Office. 

INGRIM-RUTLEDGE COMPANY 

I STATIONERS - ENGRAVERS 

] Telephone 4I9-42J Montgomery Street 

J SUTTER 6874 N '" r California 

Memorial Engrossing a specially 



1 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 21, 1925 




FINAN CE 



DOLLARS 

= — — = and — = 



SENSE 




INSURANCE 



Dollars and Sense 

PEIRCE FAIR AND CO. are offering $1,000,000 East 
Bay Water Co. 5 l / 2 per cent gold notes dated February 
21st, 1925 The proceeds are to be used for the additions 
to the plant of the corporation and will sell at 100, plus 
accrued interest. The present value of the company's 
properties is at present in excess of the outstanding liabili- 
ties, and the par value of the existing outstanding stock, 
which is in an aggregate of $10,000,000. 

* * * 

— The Sun Life Assurance Company of Canada reports: 
The rate of interest earned during the year on the mean in- 
vested assets has been 6.38 per cent., exclusive of profits 
from sales. This is a substantial increase over the rate of 
the previous year, and has resulted from our having realized 
on some of our holdings of government and other bonds 
which had risen to high figures, the proceeds being then re- 
invested in securities yielding better returns. 

* * * 

— There has been a slight reaction in industrials of all 
sorts during the last week. It is nothing to note, really, 
and does not interfere with the general tendency which is 
still upwards. In spite of the various changes from time 
to time in the market, the trend of all securities in this 
country will be forward for some time at least. There is 
a slight falling off in employment as compared with this 
time last year, according to the reports from the Eastern 
centers. Here we do not seem to have more than the 
normal lack of employment. 

* * * 

— Judging by the offers for September wheat, it does not 
appear very likely that the prices which have prevailed 
since the crops in this country gained such an advantage 
last year, will be maintained, and the problem of the wheat 
farmer will be pressing again no doubt in the fall, unless 
some unforseen circumstances unexpectedly depress the 
balance in our favor. 

— The most notable happening in the financial world this 
week is the stated determination of England to return to 
the gold standard. The permanent committee on finance 
of the League of Nations has urged the return to the gold 
standard, Czecho-Slovakia is going to establish a bank of 
issue and stabilize its currency. A return to the gold 
standard is seriously going to embarrass France and some 
people see in the eagerness of Britain a blow intended to 
hasten the decision of France on the war-debt question, 

* * * 

— We are really very funny sometimes. Thus there is 
a statement that good positions for men of sound judgment 
are open in the State Real Estate Department. These posi- 
tions are said to pay from $150 to $225 a month. When 
we know that the least the average carpenter makes is $50 
per week we are not convinced that "sound Judgment" is 
a very paying asset after all. 

* * * 

— Generally speaking, sales were lower in total than the 
record of the preceding week. Reasons are not easy to find, 
but the general feeling is that the two holidays coming so 
close together has something to do with unsettling the 
demand. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

(LATELY THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY) 
SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

by mergers orconsolidation s with other Banks. 



Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1924 

Assets $96,917,170.69 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,000,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 461,746.52 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haishtand Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Porta 1 Ave, and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (4}i) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid I'll Capital $20,000,000 $20,000,000 Reaerve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued, CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES 
THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON. ENG.; NEW YORK; 
PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

San Frnncinco Office I 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W, J. COUI.THARD 

Manager A.s«t. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

Walter W. Derr, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. 



San Francisco, Calif. 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douclas 2244 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 

LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



"The Largest Fire Insurance 
Company in America" 

Fire, Automobile, Windstorm. 
Tourists' Baggage Insurance 
: : REASONABLE RATES 



SUN LIFE 

ASSURANCE. COMPANY 

OF CANADA 



We specialize in annuities. 

You are interested in an income for 

life and should have full information. 

Your life insurance needs also taken 

care of. 

The prosperity of the Company is 
emphasized by (he fact that 6.3895 interest was earned during 
1 924 on their invested funds. 

Assets Over $270,000,000 

All life policies participate in dividends. Over $33,000, 000 in- 
vested in United States securities. $1,500,000 of which is in 
California. Phone or write 

P. M. JOST 

701 Alaska Commercial Bldg. San Francisco, California 

Phone Garfield 6540 






February 21, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 

Luxury and Smartness Predominate 
in the New 1925 Models 

By E. V. WELLER 



11 




Mrs. Archibald M. Johnson of San Francisco, her new Locomobile, and a glimpse 

of her very beautiful home in California. Mrs. Johnson is the vjife of 

Archibald M. Johnson, son of Senator Hiram Johnson. 



OLD MAN OPTIMISM, enthroned upon a pile of interest- 
ing statistics, grins forth in benevolent mien as the Ninth 
Annual Pacific Automobile Show looms on the horizon of Cali- 
fornia Motorclom. 

The State Motor Vehicle Department estimates a total regis- 
tration for California of 1,500,000 motor vehicles, a Healthy in- 
crease over the preceding twelve month period. This is enough 
to make any optimist beam forth his belief in prosperity during 
the twelve months to conic. 

The Pacific Automobile Show will be presented against a 



Venetian background with a remarkable lighting effect which 
will display to the most effective degree the Behemoths and 
the Lizzies of 1925. The musical program will be under the 
direction of Creatore and the "Ohs and Ahs" of admiration will 
have a delightful harmonic accompaniment with the strains 
from this famous band. 

Motor car dealers from all the chief cities of the West will 
be here for the show. Many of the automobile leaders of the 
East will be guests of local automobile row and numerous 
dealers' meetings and conference of distributors as well as 
salesmen will be held during the exhibition at the Auditorium. 





Jr3E 


-I _— ■ j_ ,^ 


""^e-.—^dm^MP 



The Essex Coach — the Itwtst priced six-, ylinder enclosed 
car on the market — sells at less than open car cost because 
Hudson-Essex originated the Coach and do 90 per cent of 
their business in it. To the six-cylinder motor have been 
applied the engineering principles of the Hudson Super-Six. 



The Hudson Coach v:as the first enclosed car which ever 
sold at belovj open car price. Like all Hudson and Essex 
cars, the Coach is equipped vsith balloon tires. Hudson- 
Essex originated the Coach and have built 180,000 of them 
in three years. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 21, 1925 




Nash Coupe. — One of the smartest models on display at the 
San Francisco Auto Show is the Nash Coupe, which has a 
number of special value features that are attracting favor- 
able comment from show crowds. Powered by the powerful 
Nash six-cylinder engine, the car is finding favor with San 
Francisco motorists who like to hum over the hills of this 
city on high. 



Nash Sedan. — Here is pictured one of the most pleasing 
sedan offerings of the 1925 season. It is a Nash of the 
.Advanced Six series. Beautiful coach work and excellent 
interior appointments make it an outstanding value. In com- 
mon with all new 1925 Nash models, it has four-wheel brakes 
of Nash design, balloon tires and disc wheels as standard 
equipment. This car is displayed in the exhibit space of the 
Pacific Nash Motor Company at the Auto Show. 





Model 55 Flint Sedan. 



Model 55 Flint Touring Car with California Top 
and Balloon tire equipment. 




Hupmohile Straight Eight Roadster Commands All Eyes.— 
Its rich, racy beauty — smart impressive — pick it out from the 
crowd. Power — speed — flexibility — value — durability — econ- 
omy all properly balanced in this most modern machine. 



Hupmobile New Straight Eight De Luxe Sedan. — Ranks with 
the finest cars in Europe and America, but is designed and 
priced for the American Family. 



February 21, 1925 



AND CALIF! IRN] \ \ tSEK 



13 



Interest in the mechanical developments of the past year will 
center on the eight cylinder cars, as a number of the manu- 
facturers have brought out new eight-in-line models as one ol 
the feats of advanced engineering. 

The mo. or car buyer will find much of interest at the Auto- 
mobile Show. There he will secure veritable libraries of litera- 
ture telling him all about the "why" and the "wherefore" of the 
motor car. If he is mechanically inclined, numerous exhibits of 
cut-out chasses will contribute to his happiness; while the fe- 
male of the species will find ample entertainment in the special 
show bodies designed by artists to answer the latest demands 
in the way of style and comfort. 





The Netv Marmon Standard Five Passenger, Four-door Sedan. — An 
embodiment of luxury, mounted on the standard Marmon chassis of 
\16-inch icheelbase, produced under the ne<w Marmon program and 
priced only $130 more than the open car. F. 0. B. San Francisco $3,695. 



Neiv Overland Six-cylinder De Luxe Sedan. 



Out at the Auditorium there will be cars for the business man 
and for the family. There will be snappy looking roadsters for 
the flapper and models of comfortable mien for the more sedate. 

Every hue in the rainbow has been borrowed for the occasion 
and every car in the show has been given all the polish it can 
carry so that it might speak for itself provided the salesmen in 
attendance are otherwise occupied. 

The Automobile Show is one of the great educational fea- 
tures of the day. Its chief interest may be for the buyer and 
salesman, but it is important as a spectacle of beauty and as 
a monument to the advance in engineering which has made 
such a display possible. It is indeed an exhibition that more 
than any other illustrates the advance in civilization and the 
efficiency of American engineering. In the show this year there 
are no wild departures from coach design, but refinements in 




AVqf ff'illys-Knight Six-cylinder Roadster. 

Comfort that contribute to the luxury of riding in a motor car 
arc much in evidence. 

You will find the motor car today able to go farther on less 
fuel ; able to climb a hill with le^s effort, able t" travel it high 
s|kc Is with a minimum oi vibration, and. all in all. more per- 
fected in a mechanical way than its predecessors of the shows 
that have gone befi 

The Automobile Show ts really the barometer of business 

prosperity; the automotive industry reflects the business condi- 
tions from the mini' to Market Street. It is associated in its 
development with almost even other industry and. as it shows 
marks of progress and prosperity, it reflects the prosperity of 
the many industries with which it is connected. 

In the Accessor) Section on the mezzanine floor, you will 




Ne<w Willys-Knight Six-cylinder Sedan 




The A7-:- Marmon Seven Passenger Standard Brougham. — The latest 
addition to the New Marmon Models, modish in design and luxurious 

in interior appointments, is offered at the strikingly lovi differential in 

cost of only $205.00 more than an open car. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 21, 1925 




Cadillac Sedan /'63 Custom-Built. — One of the outstanding features of 
all the shows this year has been the presentation of the new Cadillac 
custom-built models. 

find every kind of mechanical device aimed at the comfort 
and convenience of the motorist. You will find camping 
paraphernalia for your summer's trip; you will find spark 
plugs as human as the one owned by Barney Google and 
tires that never know a puncture. In fact the advance of 
the motor car industry is perhaps more evident to the lay 
mind in the accessory exhibits than in the magnificent display 
of horseless carriages on the main floor. 

Nineteen Hundred and Twenty-five looms as the greatest 
year in the history of the automotive industry, and the finest 
tonic for the pessimist to imbibe will be found in a visit to the 
Automobile Show at the Auditorium. The cars on exhibition 
there represent a tremendous investment and that investment 




Cadillac Coupe /*63 Custom Built. — The custom-built Cadillacs are fur- 
nished in a wide variety of colors and upholstery. The buyer may 
dictate the entire color scheme. 

reflects vipon all industries and promises an exceedingly 
prosperous year ahead. 

The Automobile Show you will find is a pageant of color 
as well as a pageant of progress. It comes at a time when the 
mind of the motorist is looking ahead to Spring which is just 
around the corner; when he is planning on summer trips 
through the scenic lands of California and when he is ready 
to choose the steed upon which he will depend for transport-i- 
ti< >n in the vear ahead. 



Highway Building 
Springtime in California is particularly attractive to the 
motor car owner. Nature is at this time unlocking the cof- 
fers of wealth and beauty and displaying her colorful wares 
for the delectation of all. The Redwood Highway is pre- 
paring for the greatest tourist influx in its history. The 
motor camps along the Pacific Highway that leads to Ore- 
gon are enlarging their quarters in anticipation of taking 
care of thousands of travelers enroute to and from the Pa- 
cific northwest. The Coast and Valley Highways south will 
undoubtedly break all records for motor car traffic during 
the touring season that is about to be opened. 




Chandler Sedan. — The smart closed car pictured above is one 
of the pleasing Chandler offerings for the year. Along with 
all the Chandler models at the show, it is powered with the 
famous Pike's Peak motor, has the Traffic Transmission. 
which prevents all clashing of gears; balloon tires and offers 
four-wheel brakes as optional equipment at a slight extra 
charge. 



Chandler Coach. — One of the outstanding models in the 
Exposition Auditorium Auto Show is the new Chandler Coach 
Imperial. Scores of people crowded the exhibit space of the 
Chandler Cleveland Motor Car Company yesterday for the 
purpose of viewing this new closed car offering. The body 
is by Fisher and the coach has such pleasing features as: 
extra wide doors; the famous I'. V. windshield and beautiful 
upholstery. It is an outstanding value. 






February 21, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVF.RT1SKR 



15 



It is hard to understand with such a prospect ahead how 
the Opposition which ha- sprung up to the proposed high- 
way development in California can stand their ground. 
The decision of the State Legislature on the program for 
financing the highway construction of California will he 
watched with interest not only by the motoring- public of 
California, but by motor car owners throughout the United 





Four-passenger Equipoised Peerless 8 Phaeton, 



twelve months gave way to Illinois, which now has 4,105 
miles as compared with California's 3,466 miles. Road 
building means a greater demand for motor vehicles and 
this greater demand in motor vehicles means a demand for 
more roads, so that a chain of progress is formed which has 
no end. The defeat of the gasoline tax at the ensuing session 



Five-passenger Equipoised Peerless 8 Suburban Coupe, 

States. California has always taken the lead in good road 
development, but owing to the depletion of funds provided 
by State road bond issues during the last year, the program 
of road development has not kept pace with the past. Up 
to last year California led all the states in the Union in the 
number of miles of concrete highways, but within the last 




Five-passenger Equipoised Peerless 8 Sedan. 




The above is representative nf the quality design of body 
exhibited on the Lincoln chassis by Le Baron. Lincoln Bodies 
are all the products of such craftsmen as Fleetwood, Bruner. 
Judkins, Le Baron, etc. 



Four-passenger Coupe body on Lincoln chassis by Judkins. 
It is interesting to note that Lincoln bodies are of custom 
design. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 21, 1925 



of the Legislature would prove a body blow to California 
progress and to the development of her resources. It would 
mean that California, which has been a leader in road devel- 
opment, has decided to rest on her laurels and allow other 
states to set the pace. It would mean a loss of prestige and 
an immeasurable handicap to the motor traffic of future 
years. We are not building roads for today, but for the 
future and for that reason, men of vision demand that 
California's great highway construction program go on. 

As the message of the Automobile Show is progress, it 
is apparent to all that this rapidly growing industry, which 
is the very barometer of prosperity, shall enjoy the whole- 
hearted co-operation that means adequate provision for the 
increased traffic coincident to the increase in motor car 
production. 




Duesenberg Town-Brougham straight-eight body by Fleetwood. 




An extremely stylish three-passenger roadster in this Duesen- 
herg straight -eight, body by Rubay, mounted on 134 inch 
chassis. 



This Duesenberg Limousine-Sedan is powered with a 
straight-eight engine 22$x5", having overhead camshaft. 
Internal jour-wheel hydraulic brakes of Duesenberg design 
are used. 







\ 



Jordan Playboy Eight. — No event has aroused more interest 
than the introduction of the Jordan Great Line Eight, which 
develops 74 h.p. and has a high speed range varying from 
over seventy to as low as one or two miles an hour. Equip- 
ment includes balloon tires, hydraulic four-wheel brakes, 
automatic spark control, and new type rotary air cleaner. 



The Great Jordan Line Eight Brougham ; Women, weary of 
the commonplace, will be quick to sense the charm, — the 
personality which makes this Jordan a dominant, definite, 
daringly interesting thing. 



February 21, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 




Percy E. Towne, chairman oi the conference, annoum 
today that final decision on the question oi refinancing new 
state highwa) construction has been postponed until the 
meeting to be held in Sacramento, Wednesday, February 25. 

In announcing the membership of the legislative commit- 
tee of the Motor Vehicle conference, Chairman Towne aid 
that it has been given full authority to act in supporting 
Senate Bills Nos. 599 and No. 600, which have the approval 
of the conference, and to vigorously oppose in the name of 
all organizations represented in the conference a score or 
more bills, which if passed, would cost the motorists of 
California millions of dollars annually. 



Kleiber Sedan — "Made in San Francisco.' 

Price $2,350.00 fully equipped. 



Take the Rodeo- Vallejo Ferry! 

Automobile tourists will delight in driving through beau- 
tiful Napa Valley and vicinity of Vacaville, for thousands 
of acres of fruit trees are now in bloom. For the accommo- 
dation of these travelers, the Rodeo-Vallejo Ferry will run 
boats during the coming holidays, — Saturday, Sunday and 
Monday, and Tuesday morning until one o'clock. 




Kleiber Coach — "Made in San Francisco.' 
Price $2,150.00 fully equipped. 



Motor Vehicle Conference Appoints Legislative Committee 
With the usual deluge of hills and measures of every de- 
scription affecting automobile owners before the Legisla- 
ture, the Motor Vehicle conference, composed of representa- 
tive state organizations, has appointed a legislative com- 
mittee of seven members with power to act in supporting 
or opposing hills affecting the operation of motor vehicles. 



-. 

- 




The fine proportions and graceful lines of the Stanley 
5-Passenger Touring Car are suggestive of the smooth- 
ness and eagerness of its' power. The comforts and con- 
veniences with which it is provided, together with the 
ease of its operation and control, endow this model with 
an even wider range of utility than any other car of 
like type. 



The following committee has been named : A. C. Hardi- 
son, president. California Farm Bureau Federation; W. O. 
Russell, chairman, legislative committee County Super- 
visors' Association of California; D. V. Nicholson, assistant 
secretary, California State Automobile Association ; David 
R. Faries, consulting counsel, Automobile Club of Southern 
California; A. F. Lemberger, manager, San Francisco Motor 
Car Dealers Association; Will H. .Marsh, chief of the Divi- 
sion of Motor Vehicles; R. N. Wilson, industrial director, 
California Development Association. 



Over 15,000 Members Get Emergency Road Service 

Since it was inaugurated in the larger centers on April 1 
last year, the free mechanical first aid and towing service 
of the California State Automobile Association has assisted 
over 15,000 members whose cars have been wrecked or 
stalled on the road. This service is now state-wide, operat- 
ing in over 250 cities and towns throughout California. 







Ricieithactrr— Model C. 



Touring 



IS 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 21, 1925 




Garford Type KB De Luxe Coach, Fifteen Passengers. — You have 
been looking for a motor coach like the Garford Type KB. It is 
specially designed, from the efficient, six-cylinder engine, unequalled 
in power and pick-up for motor coaches of this capacity, to the bag- 
gage compartment in the rear. It is exceptionally low-hung, hand- 
some, comfortable and reliable. For additional information see it at 
Garford Factory Branch, Eighth and Howard streets. Phone Market 
520. Heavy Duty Trucks and Motor Coach Chassis. 



Motorists Should Secure 1925 License Plates 
Don't wait until the last minute to secure your 1925 yel- 
low and black license plates through the Division of Motor 
Vehicles, at Sacramento. They can also be secured by the 
Automobile Chilis of the city. 




The Division of Motor Vehicles is facing- a colossal task 
in handling almost one and one-half million registrations 
in a few weeks' time, and every motorist should co-operate 
in cutting down the burden of a last minute rush in which 
to get their plates. 




Lynch & Sons have standardized on Sterling Equipment throughout. 
Picture shows model E. W. No. 23. 



A Special Parlor Car model Fageol Safety Coach in de luxe lour service 
between San Francisco and Los Angeles. The coach seats 18 passengers, 
and is fitted with every luxury known in motor cars, including reclining 
back chairs and ice water. 



During the past two weeks or so thousands of the 1925 
number plates have been issued. The heaviest rush was in 
the first few days, but they have been going out steadily 
ever since. 

With but a little over a week left before registrations 
will become delinquent after midnight, March 2nd, motor- 
ists are urged to secure their plates as soon as possible, and 
not wait until the last minute when the press of business 
engagements or other circumstances might force them to 
pay a 100 per cent penalty for late registration. 




Model 27K ^-cylinder Autocar. 138 inch wheelbase. % ton 
with overall carrying capacity of 15,000 pounds, turnim/ 
circle 45 feet. 



Model 27H, ^-cylinder Autocar, 114 inch wheelbase. % ton 
with overall carrying capacity of 15,000 pounds. Turning 
circle 38 feet. 



February 21, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



19 




When Hal E. Roach, producer of well-known him comedies, 
came to California his first job was as a White truck driver 
for the General Petroleum Corporation in Southern Cali- 
fornia. Last week Roach stepped back 13 years and assisted 
in the driveaway ceremonies when 15 new White Trucks 
were driven to San Francisco, where the General Petroleum 
was to enter the retail gasoline field. 



Automobile Show Exhibit Planned by Association 

An elaborate exhibit exemplifying the various activities 
of the California State Automobile Association and por- 
traying the scenic beauties of the Northern and Central 
California territory served by the Association will be dis- 
played at the Pacific Automobile Show at the Civic Audi- 
torium in San Francisco, February 21 to 28. 

Various services which the Association furnishes to its 
members and to the general motoring public such as road 
signing, emergency road service, touring service and the 
like will be worked into the theme of the display, Automo- 
bile Association executives said today. 

Giant photographic enlargements of Northern and Cen- 
tral California scenes will be the central feature of the 
exhibit. 



Use of the Clutch on Grades 

It is considered better practice not to release the clutch 
on down grades. Better and safer braking power is ob- 
tained with the clutch engaged and injury to clutch mech- 
anism is prevented, It is better not to drive with clutch 
depressed unless absolutely necessary. 



Road Sign Trucks Travel 149,670 Miles in Year 

In the erection of new signs and the repair and mainte- 
nance of Northern and Central California's system of over 
48,000 yellow diamond direction and danger signals, patrol 
cars ami sign posting trucks of the California State Auto- 
mobile Association last year traveled a total distance equal 
to almost six times the circumference of the globe. 

In one \ ear these road signing crews erected 7.47S signs 
and 6,043 si-n posts. In the same period 15,731 posts were 

painted, 18,583 signs repaired and 18,173 signs cleaned. In 

securing the necessary data, in the actual performance of 
the work and its supervision, the Association fleet of patrol 
cars and trucks covered a total distance of 149,670 miles. 



5j|f Motor Oils 




Are recognized by the highest authorities in engine 
building as the most economical, efficient and uniform In 
quality — 

A PURE PENNSYLVANIA PRODUCT 

VALVOLINE OIL COMPANY 



462 Bryant St., San Francisco 



122 Center St., Los Angeles 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that a vigorous brushing once or twice a day Is 
taking: very grond care of them. Brushing: is only a part of the 
process. Many things can happen to your teeth which only a 
competent dentist can take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as you Imagine. A toothache means 
trouble; do not wait for the ache. Watch, your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth sore? Do your gums bleed? Call In today 
and talk It over. It will cost nothing. My nerve blocking sys- 
tem blocks ouT all nerves and pain. It -will please you. 

DR. W. W. H0AGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfield 335 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crowns; Self Cleaning Brldce>| 

Porcelain Work and Roofless Plates 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED AND GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage of Automobiles 



SANITARY DRINKING WATER 

For Homes, Offices and Factories. Quality Guaranteed 

KEYSTONE WATER COMPANY 

130 Russ St. Phone Hemlock 170 San Francisco 



ARE YOUR BRAKES SAFE? 

We Specialize on Brakes Only— Flat Prices on All Cars 

S. F. BRAKE SERVICE 

ST. FRANCIS GARAGE, 1240 POST STREET 

(Bet. Van Ness Ave. and Franklin St.) 

Phone Prospect 1915 




TEL. FRANKLIN 3685 
Metal Work Apper- 
tain tnfr to Automo- 
biles — Oxy-Acerylene 
Welding — Black- 
- mi 1 hi nc. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



Income Tax Service 



Advice Given and Returns Made at Your Home, 
by Appointment. 

J. Leo Park 

230 Russ Building — 235 Montgomery Street 
Phone Garfield 5364 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 21, 1925 



Bits of Unwritten History 



By Edward S. Spring 



CHAPTER XXIV 
Lunch At the Pantheon 

FOR many rears, before it was completely destroyed by 
the earthquake and fire, of 1906, the Pantheon, was one 
of the show places of San Francisco's financial district. Lo- 
cated on the south side of California Street, a few doors east 
of Sansome, this once famous cafe-saloon, was surrounded 
by the city's biggest banks, stock exchanges and insurance 
and mercantile offices. The Pantheon was owned and man- 
aged by George Dawson and was so well conducted by him, 
that it' won a large patronage from bankers, brokers, mer- 
chants and insurance men, who, at one time, or another, 
during the day, needed refreshment. The Pantheon was 
richly and artistically furnished with mahogany and black 
walnut, and glass, and costly paintings and ornamental fix- 
tures, and had a floor of black and white marble in squares. 
One of its features, placed near the main entrance, was a 
movable mirror, which had the words "Stocks Up" on one 
part of the frame and "Stocks Down" on the other. When 
the mirror read "Stocks Up," one saw himself very fat and 
prosperous looking. But, when it said "Stocks Down," he 
appeared thin and miserable. Dawson used to adjust this 
mirror according to the stock market. On a "bull" day, 
most everybody had a good look at himself and went smil- 
ing over to the bar, where he had another "smile." 

While Dawson's well selected stock of wines, liquors and other 
liquid refreshments drew a large patronage from substantial men 
and women in the neighborhood, the chief attraction of 
the Pantheon was its lunch, served, on week days only, at 
11 a. m. to 2 p. m. The menu was changed daily, and in- 
cluded soup, dressed salads of several kinds, fish, two, or 
more, entrees, roast and boiled meats, vegetables, and sev- 
eral kinds of bread, with butter and, on a small buffet, were 
four or five kinds of cheese, which were Dawson's pride, 
together with crackers, fancy cakes, etc. This elaborate 
lunch, deliriously cooked and well served, including any kind 
of a drink, straight or mixed, was to be had at the Pantheon, 
for the small sum of 25 cents. Business men, to whom time 
was money, went there freely, because it was a "stand-up" 
lunch, from which they could get away quickly, unless they 
stopped to gossip with each other, and "crack a joke," which 
they often did, after eating at the two main tables. 

The Pantheon, accordingly, became a sort of clearing 
house for gossip and jokes. George Dawson, who was 
around among his customers, heard most everything they 
said, and newspaper men, who wanted a good story, could 
almost always get it from him. although he was discreet in 
giving out news. Many years ago, he gave the present 
writer this amusing account of how three banking officials 
tried to decide who was the meanest man in San Francisco. 

These officials were from the Bank of California, the Lon- 
don and San Francisco Bank and the Anglo-California 
Bank. They had just finished their lunch and were taking 
a second drink at the bar. where they were served by 
Dawson. 

"The meanest man in San Francisco," said the Bank of 

California man, was old who came here in 1850 

and after accumulating over .$5,000,000 by usury and cinch 
methods went back to Germany to visit his birthplace, which 
had grown from a small village to a good-sized town. All 
his relatives and old friends were dead and he was having 
a lonely time there, when a circus arrived. Thinking it 
would cheer him up, old decided to go to the show. 



The tickets of admission were fifty pfennings each, or about 
\2y 2 cents in our money. His old meanness prevailed and 
he resolved to get in for nothing, by climbing a fence. When 
on top of the fence, he slipped and fell heavily to the ground, 
broke his neck and died — all to save \2 l / 2 cents. That's 
about as mean a thing as I ever heard." 

The London and San Francisco Bank official had his turn 
next. "That's pretty bad, he said, "but I have in mind old 

■ who had many millions loaned on real estate ir. 

all parts of this city and who every day used to walk up one 
street, and down another, where the properties were, to 
see that they had not disappeared over night. Several years 
of this strenuous exercise wore him out. He had heart 
failure and died." 

Both stories show up some very mean men," said the 
representative of the Anglo-California Bank, but I know of 

one who was meaner. I refer to old . He was as 

rich as Croesus, but he was so damned mean, that every 
time he went to Oakland, he used to sit in the last seat 
of the last car of the train on the mole, so that when he 
arrived he would be the last out and beat the Southern Pa- 
cific out of that much interest on the cost of his fare, which 
was then 10 cents." 

Dawson, who referred this contest, decided that the 
Anglo-California Bank man was the winner and they had 
another round of drinks. 

At another time, Dawson overhead a travelling sales- 
man for a big clothing house, on Sansome street, tell this 
story to a fellow-luncher : 

"America Can't Be Beaten" 

said the clothing drummer: "It was in the lobby of a 
small hotel in Santa Cruz. A few of us traveling boys 
were smoking and swapping lies, in the evening, when a 
Britisher, who was handling a line of goods for a Canadian 
house, joined us and began to boost everything that was 
English and run down American things. Over in England, 
he said, they had the finest fruits and vegetables, the pret- 
tiest girls, the fastest horses, and so on, while here in 
America, everything was second-class, off-color and no 
good. None of us had seen as much as he had. Why! com- 
ing over from England on his last trip, he had seen a man 
in the middle of the Atlantic, swimming to New York, with 
an anvil weighing 1.000 pounds strapped to his back." 

"Stop right there," said an American drummer to the 
Englishman. "I know now, that you are an honest man. 
I can verify that story, for I was the man who was swim- 
ming, across, with the anvil on my back." 

"The Englishman thanked him, bat looked very hard at 
him. The American did not bat an eye. 

"Tired of his blowing I left him with the other drummers 
and went to the hotel office and found that the Britisher's 
room was on the next floor, directly overhead. I had seen 
them bringing in a sack of freshly caught crabs, that after- 
noon and found them on the back porch, near the kitchen 
'1m,, r. Selecting two of the largest and fiercest, I took them 
up stairs, into the man's room and put them under the 
clothes in his bed. Then I returned to the hotel lobby to 
await results. 

"The Englishman, having exhausted his fund of bombast, 
gave us a pitying look, drawled out 'Good night' and went 
tip stairs to his room. The American boys would have 
retired too, but I made them remain and be patient. Half 
an hour passed and then, we heard heavy thumping and 
loud shrieks above. Down the stairs and into the lobby 
rushed the Britisher with two fierce crabs fastened to the 
tail of his night shirt. 

"Take 'em off! he yelled. 'Take 'em off. What are they?' 

"They are American bedbugs," I said. "Have you got 
anything to beat 'em in England?" 

(To be continued) 



\ 



February 21, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



21 



Wheat and Chaff 

By Nathaniel Anderson 




A 



Nathaniel Anderson 



S A BOY I heard an actor 
give a scene from a play 
called "Sex Against Sex", and 
though I only mention this 
recollection as a preface to a 
word about sex against sex 
seen in the phase of husband 
and wife. I am thrown off my 
subject like the woman who is 
reminded of something dis- 
tractingly away from the point. 
I am pitched by the tricky 
functioning of the brain cells 
onto ground fertile for thought, 
and though illogical, I cannot 
resist staying there a moment. 
"Sex Against Sex" as a title 
and the actor in the role of an 
impassioned head of a family, 
I remember, dramatically ex- 
claiming the sex antagonism as the cause of great dim 
culties impressed me with something I was to learn more 
of through life. I did not know I was to gain knowledge 
on this subject, as was the case with thousands of other 
nuclei of thoughts for the future. Such impressions of our 
youth are the real fundamentals of learning. What we do 
for ourselves by thinking fertilizes the seeds for ideas in- 
cidentally blown our way when we are still very young. 
There is no substitute in the schools for the method of the 
brain that works for itself. In fact, during our class-room 
education we often forget to think because of continually 
applying ourselves to rules on subjects that are advanced 
beyond the idea in the mind. A rule should never be given 
a student until he is about ready to make one for himself. 
which would be the kind he would break and modify until 
it was made to fit the truth more accurately. 

After playing around, permit me to leap back over the 
fence to where the husband and wife are wrangling. The 
sex and sex problem of these two is often but a petty affair. 
They will not finish the meal to the empty platter with 
each taking what he or she likes. "Jack Spratt could eat 
no fat, his wife could eat no lean, so betwixt them both 
you see they — " but they won't do it like the couple in Old 
Mother Goose. 

* * * 

The good suffer for the bad, even with infants: the mis- 
deeds and ingratitude of orphaned children have stayed the 
hands of a world of foster parents. I know a vaudeville 
team who told me of an intention which they relinquished 
to adopt a child. They were even on their way to an or- 
phanage. While riding in a train the husband read of one 
of these children, then somewhat grown, attacking the 
woman he had learned to call mother. Johnny, the com- 
edian, insisted that he and Jessie get out at the next 
station and catch a train home. We cannot reach the 
minds of infants with opinions like these, but we are called 
upon to say to the grown-up childless that viciousness 
among fostered children is not absolute. Few things are. 
We only need to call attention to the St. Louis policeman 
who is 'both proud and happy as the father of eighteen 

adopted children. 

* * * 

We hope the competition in producing salacious plays 
has reached a climax that bursts from its own noxious 



odors. It is too bad that the public has sat in the theatres 
until the air became so foul they went forth in the middle 
of performances holding their noses. We dislike to admit 
that actresses have shown us the most intimate proceedings 
of prostitutes, and indecencies of ladies who were not so, 
until the receding backs of a good portion of their "dear 
public" menaced their standing. These things are happen- 
ing in New York. As for Helen MacKellar, we do not 
know to how much of this kind of acting she has submitted 
to, but if it is the truth that her modesty was sickentd by 
"A Good Bad Woman", and that she not only quit her role 
in the play, but is suing the managers for damage to her 
reputation for getting her into such a mess, we want to 
say that to Miss MacKellar is owed the hearty thanks of 
an indignant quota of the public, that thinks a halt should 
have been called long ago. 



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22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 21, 1925 



The Bib and Tucker 
The moment one enters this attractive restaurant in Sut- 
ter Street, one notices the quiet, refined atmosphere of the 
place; the absence of clattering noises; the absence of 
mingled odors which usually stale the air of most eating 
places On clear days, the sun pours into the room, bright 
flowers show up from the tables, and the service is courteous 
and rapid. There is a pleasant little sitting room where 
one may read or rest, without disturbance of any kind, and 
altogether there is a homelike air about the whole restaurant 
thaHs very soothing. The cuisine is under the personal su- 
pervision of Mrs. Jones, the hostess, and everything is abso- 
lutely "home cooked." "A rainy day special" consists of 
hot soup with the usual 50c lunch, and everyone knows how 
steaming soup appeals in wet weather ; while the white clus- 
ter rolls, and graham rolls served here are becoming quite 
famous. Take the elevator at 330 Sutter Street, go up to 
the third floor, and eventually become a habitue of the Bib 
and Tucker. 



The inhabitants of Gomera, one of the Canary Island-, use 
a system of whistling signals for conveying bits of news anil 
information over considerable distances with great rapidity. 
According to reports this system dates back hundreds of years. 

Several cities in Norway own and operate their film theaters 
and devote the profits to' cultural enterprises for the people's 
enjoyment and benefit. Christiania's profit from this source 
for 1921 was $350,000 and this sum has been allotted to a 
studio building, a people's theater, a concert hall, a music pa- 
vilion and to the advancement of natural sciences. 



At an auction sale President Harding's picture brought $46 
against $26 for that of former President Wilson. The sale 
was held in Stanton, Virginia, the birthplace of Mr. Wilson. 

The Bubonic plague which usually breaks out in China dur- 
ing June, made its appearance in April last year. Thousands 
in the interior districts have died. 



What is believed to be the thickest seam of black coal dis- 
covered in the world is being exploited in Queensland, Aus- 
tralia. The seam is entirely free from clay bands and is 93 
feet thick in places. The mine is 280 miles from the nearest 
seaport. 



The population of France is dwindling at the rate of 200,000 
yearly. 



Colors of 
Initials 

Cold 

Black 

Creen 

Lavender 

Red 

Silver 

Blue 

Yellow 

While 

Cun Metal Black 

$5.00 

for 100 Packs 




Color of 
Match Packs 

Cold 
Black 
Bluo 

Yellow 

Silver 

Orange 

Light Bluo 

Purplo 

Lavender 

$3.50 

for 50 Packs 



$2.00 



for 12 Packs 



MONOGRAM MATCH PACKS 

(TRADE MARK) 
Will. Your Own Initials— In a Neat Box. Ideal for the dinner, Miiti Jongg or Bridg.- 
Table. The smartest smoking accessory. A charming gift. In Oval, Diamond Shape, 
or Block Type. Be sure to stale color of pack, color of initial and llylfl of lype 
desired. Mail your order and check at once to 

MONOGRAM MATCH COMPANY 
1402 De Young Building San Francisco, Calif. 

Or at Your Dealers: S. & G Gump Co., San Francisco; City of Paris, San Fran- 
cisco; Roos Bros., San Francisco; Paul Elder Co., San Francisco; Fairmont Hotel, 
San Francisro; Howell Dohrmann Co., Oakland; J. W. Robinson Co., Lob Angeles; 
Mias Guyclle, Honolulu, T. H.; Meier and Frank Co., Portland. Ore. 



WHERE TO DINE 



CAFE MARQUARD 




Adjoining Wilkes and Curran 

Theaters, Geary and Mason. 

Phone Prospect 61 

1925 REVUE 

Sparkling Entertainment 
DINING : -DANCING 

After-Theater Suppers 
Superb Service 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

THE MOST POPULAR RESTAURANT IN SAN FRANCISCO 

05 I'.ist Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4536 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners. $1.25. Meals Served a la Carte. 

Also Regular French and Italian Dinners. 

Fifth and Game a Specialty 



BLANCO'S 



O'Fnrrell and Larkln Streets Phone Franklin 

No visitor should leave the city without dining 

in the finest cafe In America 

I. ■million (11:30 to 2 p. m.) - 75c 

Dinner, Week Day* ------- »1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays ----- $1.75 



The only real artistic place in the Latin Quarter. Bohemian 

dinner, 75c — served every evening. Saturday, Sunday and 

Holidays, $1.25. Dancing from 7 to 1 every evening. 

BEGIN'S BOLOGNA RESTAURANT 

240 Columbus Avenue Phone Sutter 8825 



Louis Cerles. Jean Barrere, John Piegth, Props. 

NEW SHARON GRILL 

Formerly Bergez-Frank's Old Poodle Dog, Bush Street 

35 NEW MONTGOMERY STREET 

Opposite Palace Hotel Phone Sutter 8*368 



Women's Building Sandwich Shop 

212 Ellis 

Breakfasts 35c-50c Lunch 50c Table d'hote Dinner 60c 

A la carte orders at all times 




Mary Hereto Caroline Jones 

Luncheon is served from 11 :30 to 2:30 

and tea from 3 to 5 



w&rr 



334 Sutter St. 



Douglas 7118 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

113 Third Avenue. SAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 

Open From 

11:30 a. m. to 2:00 p. m. 

5:30 p. m. to 8:30 p. m. 

Sundays and Holidays 

4:30 to 8:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 
Half Block from Hlirhwny 



February 21, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



23 




Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

*'PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 

239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



By KEM 

"The supreme artist is shown by the insight and boldness with 
which he seizes and illuminates the bright points at each stage, 

leaving the marginal elements in due subordination 

Novelists so unlike as Flaubert and Tolstoy, yet alike impress us by 
the simple vividness of their artistic effects." 

R. M. G., in C. S. Monitor. 

Marbacka, by Selma Lagerlof, is the autobiography of 
Selma Lagerlof; as one critic says: "It is the soul of 
Selma Lagerlof," who is known as "the most beloved woman 
in Sweden." It is easy to understand why she is so dearly 
beloved, after reading this simple narrative of her life at 
the family homestead, for she was fortunate in parents who 
reflected love to all about them. She shows herself a 
"supreme artist" in depicting her father and we are im- 
pressed by the "simple vividness" of the picture of him as 
a playfellow with his children ; his schemes for improve- 
ment of the home, and his streak of Scandinavian super- 
stition that made him wonder to the end of his days: "Was 
it true that one who did violence to a cat was punished." 

Doubleday, Page and Company, publishers ; $2.50. 

* * i 

Noble Prize: The publishers of Selma Lagerlof 's auto- 
biography have invited the writers of the League of Ameri- 
can Pen Women to submit their individual opinions of the 
work which will be published in a limp binding, Edition 
de Luxe and it will be sent to the author as a tribute to the 
one woman who has ever won the Noble Literary Prize ol 
one thousand dollars. Selma Lagerlof won this prize for 
her Norse Folk Tales. She is a member of the Swedish 
Academy, which awards this Literary Prize under the pat- 
ronage of the King. One other woman, Mme. Curie, won 
a similiar amount — the scientific prize. One woman is a 
Pole, the other a native of Sweden. Mrs. Frona Eunice 
Waite Colburn, President of the San Francisco Branch 
League of American Pen Women, is singularly fitted to 
analyze the Folk Tales of another writer, being an acknow- 
ledged authority on American Myths and Legends. Mrs. 
Coiburn says of Selma Lagerlof's work: "Scandinavian 
Mysticism is nut so hopelessly dreary as the Slavic. It has 
something of the same wistfulness, but in all of Selma 
Lagerlof's writings there is a sane optimism which is as 
refreshing as it is unusual." 

* * * 

Ollanta — Peruvian Classic: During the month of Feb- 
ruary. Mrs. Frona Eunice Waite Colburn will give for the 
first time in North America an oral reading of tin Peruvian 
'Classic Epic "Ollanta," with excerpts from the opera of 
that name, to be rendered by the Fairmont orchestra under 
the leadership of Rudy Seiger. This event is alreadj ex- 
citing great interest among lovers of the heroic :is ( Mlanta 
is of the same type as l.e Lid. This story was being recited 
by the Peruvian Indians at the time Pizarro made his 
conquest. It is a tribute to its intrinsic worth that the 
Spaniards have preserved this story during the last 400 
\ ears. 



Established 28 Years 

EXTRA HAIR 
COVER THE BOB 



FOR 

WEAR 



EVENING 

NOW BEING SHOWN AT 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

815 Clement Street San Francisco 360 Geary Street 

2331 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley 
MR. AND MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 



Make yourself at home at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tillmann Place, at 241 Grant Ave. 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Rare Books — First Editions — Fine Bindings 

Importations from Zachnsdorf, Root, Morrell, etc., of London 

Commissions in London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

Phone Kearny 5S16 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVB11TS, FLUMES, 

PENSTOCKS, GASHOLDERS, SMOKE STACKS, ETC. 

San Francisco, Calif. Los Angeles, Calif. 

444 Market St. B717 Santa Fe Avenue 



Be Photographed This Year on Your Birthday 






STUDIOS IN ALL 

PRINCIPAL CITIES OF 

CALIFORNIA 



Oakland 

408 J lib Street 

San Frnnclsco 

41 Grant Avenue 



St. Mary's Academy 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 



For particulars address 
SISTER SUPERIOR 



Select Boarding and Day School Under the 
Direction of the Sisters of St. Dominic 



\ Xeva.la aviator, en ionic from Buffalo, New York, to 
Nome. Alaska, wa^ forced to land at Niggerhead Flat, on 
Seven-mile River, 75 miles from Dawson, because of engine 
trouble. I lis airplane descended into the midst of a hi 
caribou, one of which the aviator killed for food. The plane. 
partially wrecked, was abandoned, the aviator proceeding by 
steamer to Fairbanks. 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Suits Pressed By Hand Only—Snlts Called For and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

PARISIAN DYEING AND CLEANING 



521 Post Street 
In Ylrcinla Hotel 



San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 1510 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 21, 1925 




By Hoot McGregor 



THE SAN FRANCISCO REAL ESTATE BOARD 
Golf Tournament weathered the storm of hope, anx- 
iety and cespair. rain, hail, thunder and lightning, but 
finished in a blaze of glory when Jack Kennedy won the 
finals in the first fligth, to say nothing of the glory in the 
winning of Ed Hooper, of Umbsen, Kerner and Stevens of 
the Old Guard, of the second flight, George Klemyer, third 
flight winner, Fred Young, fourth flight winner, Duncan 
Davis (no relation to Duncan, the golf professional), win- 
ner of the fifth flight, D. Watkins, winner of the sixth 
flight, F. Sutton, winner of the seventh flight, Felix Kahn, 
winner of the eighth flight and Frank Kirschner, winner of 
the ninth flight. 

The following are some of the remarks made by this gal- 
lant band of Realtors after the contest: 

LESTER LOUPE : "I thought I had it won, but I am 
afraid that Hirschberg put the jinx on me." 

THEO. RULFS: "I can beat many, but Jack Kennedy 
broke my heart." 

BILL MANATON: "After Rammie lost I had to keep 
him company. I tossed the match in the semi finals." 

BILL HALEY: "Prayers do not win golf matches. If 
they did, I would have won." 

AL HARRISON : "I did not enter — the company was 
too fast." 

LOUIE LURIE: "When I complete my tenth million 
I will take up golf. I have only $250,000 to go." 

GEORGE IVANCOVICH: "I beat Ed Hooper to the 
green on speed, but he won the holes." 

COLBERT COLDWELL: "Mr. Otis Brun repre- 
sented our firm. Otis failed. I will play myself next 
year." 

V. M. MOIR (Assistant Secretary of the Board) : "Lots 
of work for me. Glad it's over, but call on me anytime. 
It's my gang." 

FRED PALMER: "I won a cup. The family have 
gone wild." 

JIMMY HURST: "My firm was in disgrace. I saved 
the day for Harrigan-Weidenmuller." 

DREW HARRIGAN : "Glad it's over. Could not sleep 
for a month before the tournament." 

LEW WEIDENMULLER: "I did sleep nights before 
the tournament. Must keep the firm going." 

ST. GEORGE HOLDEN: "I won my first match with 
a pair of sixes. Lost the second with too manv tens." 

FELIX KAHN: "You cannot buy my cup' for SI, 000." 

DAVE EISENBACH: "I give c'ups but do not win 
them." 

POLLY WILLARD (of Lyon & Hoag) : "I lost my 
match in the semi-finals. More power to young Hogrefe, 
who beat me!" 

ED HOOPER: "I can beat Lester Loupe and Ivan- 
covich, but Rammie has got my goat." 

When BILL WOODFIELD won. he was so tickled that 
he bought the gang a feed. 

PERCY BRUN: "Made a record. Won two defaults. 
Lost one match." 

GUS EISERT (The Bush Street Realtor) : "Father 
asked me to stay home. I was an obedient son " 

GEORGE BOND: "Percy Brun has nothing on me. 
I can win any match by default." 



"I won a cup once. Nothing 



see you any time 
[ feel, boys. I am 
Feather River cup 
my brother-in-law, 



OSCAR TURNBLAD: 
selfish about me." 

YINC FINIGAN (of Buckbee, Thorne) : "What do you 
mean tournament? I only play at Del Monte." 

LOUIE FOERSTER: "Have purchased two clubs, one 
more and I will start." 

WALTER SULLIVAN: "Glad to 
vou want a cup. Call again." 

GEORGE ROOS: "You know ho< 
for you all." 

CHIC CHAQUETTE: "Guess the 
will have to do me for this year." 

GEORGE KANE: "If Bill Haley, 
beat Bill Manaton, mv boss, I would have lost my job." 

ALBERT KERN: "Youth must be served. I cannot 
seem to win a cup. I can buy one, however." 

A. M. ROSENSTIRN: "Yes, I was in the tourname.it 
and I was out of it, too, but watch me at Del Monte !" 

GEORGE BOARDMAN (President of the Board) : "I 
am glad to see the good fellowship the boys are showing 
on the golf course. It also helps them in the business." 

SAMUEL BUCKBEE: "I cannot talk to you about 
golf. I will sell vou a Market Street holding, however." 

JACK DUNN and BILL WILLIAMS: "We are tired 
of listening to Golf alibis. Let's get down to business." 

DEL MAR CLINTON: "I did not enter. With all 
modesty I might say that I won the championship at Ma- 
nila four years ago." 

BILLGILMOUR: "HootMon! Just give me another 
chance." 

JULIAN THORNE : "Just see my secretary. I do not 
know what it is all about." 

MACFARLANE (Title Insurance & Guaranty) : "Bring 
in your searches and I will tell you how I missed my puts." 

HOWARD MALLEN : "I just rolled around the course 
on a flat tire. I am not a mud lark." 

DICK EISERT : "I can knock them dead at Del Monte. 
I would like to have my handicap reduced to 8." 

LESLIE BURKS (Secretary of the Real Estate Board) : 
"Come on you golfing real estaters from Los Angeles! 
Will show vou a thing or two at Del Monte this year." 

JACK KENNEDY: "How did I win my match? I 
have nothing to say. Modesty forbids." 

FRANK KIRCHNER (Winner of the 9th Flight) : "I 
won the ninth flight quite easily. Bring on your first 
(lighters. " 

H. F. RAMACCIOTTI : "I refuse to be interviewed— 
nothing for the press." 
r..................... ................ ...... 

I W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 
208 Crocker Building (Opposite Palace Hotel) San Francisco 
Phone Kearny 391 



Mayerle's Eyewater" 

For 30 years the moNt popular Eye Tonic 
for children and adultft... At dru^sruitH 55c, 
by mall 70c. 

George Mayerle, Expert Optician, 960 Market Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 




February 21, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



25 




Boxing. In a no decision battle 
with Bud Ridley of Seattle Louis Kap, 
Ian the "Kid" was the first champion to 
show under the new California Law. 
He is the featherweight title holder, 
and he won eleven of the twelve 
rounds, all but knocking out Ridley. 

lack Dempsey is now very busy 
training for about a hundred rounds of 
housekeeping and shopping. He and 
Mrs. Dempsey, Estelle Taylor of 
moviedom, were married just last week 
and are now very busy honeymooning. 
There is no doubt that lack Dempsey 
will fight at least one more fight before 
retiring from the game entirely. Jack, 
however, cannot be interviewed at this 
time, at least only long enough to have 
him say: "Never let business interfere 
with a honeymoon." 

On Monday, February 23rd, Joe Ben- 
jamin and Jack Silver will trounce it 
out for the coast lightweight honors. 
This is. the first big lightweight bout 
since Leonard's retirement. 
* * * 

Swimming. Just think of it, a na- 
tional champion at fifteen ! This is the 
distinction that Miss Eleanor Garatti 
of San Rafael won for herself last 
Wednesday in the fifty-yard swimming 
championship. She was against one of 
the best fields of women swimmers 
ever entered in the event. After swim- 
ming one heat to a tie with two other 
girls, this sturdy young naiad turned 
around and swam in the next heat in 
one-fifth of a second less than the orig- 
inal. 

Agnes Geraghty, another woman 
swimmer, broke her former world's rec- 
ord for the 220-yard breast stroke just 
yesterday, down in St. Augustine. 
Florida, where the national swimming 
meet is being held. 

* * * 
Basketball. The University inter- 
collegiate basketball championship be- 
tween the Universities of California 
ami Stanford is going along nicely: 
that is at least for the Bears, for they 
have just won their second straight 
game over the Cardinals. 

In the Chronicle's basketball League 
there arc more than one hundred and 
fifty teams entered. Basketball this 
year is realizing the most intense popu- 
larity it has seen in these parts for 
many years. 

The Y. M. I. have won their way to 
the final match of the Pacific Associa- 
tions Tournament with the Olympic 
t'lub lor the heavyweight champion- 
ship. The V. Ml. team arc very fast. 



By Edwin F. Marriott 



and in their last game with the Pen- 
insula Squad, they held the visitors 
down to the three field goals. 

Track. Paavo Nurmi, the phantom 
Finn, will be presented to President 
Coolidge soon it was announced to 
the Amateur Atheletic Union. Ugo 
Frigerio, the Italian walking cham- 
pion, will also have the pleasure of 
meeting our President. 

Nurmi opened a new era in track 
history when he ran two miles in less 
than nine minutes at the Madison 
Square Gardens in New York. He 
really seems unbeatable. 

Amongst the College Athletes, Stan- 
ford's team is hard at work in the field 
and track events, expecting a very hard 
season this year. 

Polo. A little note of interest to add 
to the Polo following in the West may 
be gained from the following facts : 
The Hurlingame Club of London has 
fixed June 20th, 24th and 27th as the 
dates for the matches between the 
Army teams of the United States and 
Great Britain. 



Mrs. Julius Kahn Triumphs 

With 2,220 votes over the closest of 
her male opponents, Raymond A. Burr, 
Mrs. Julius Kahn, wife of the late 
Julius Kahn, wins a seat in the United 
States Congress, where, so she says, 
she will endeavor to carry out the poli- 
cies of her husband. This is the sec- 
ond time within two years that San 
Francisco has elected the widow of a 
congressman to succeed her husband. 



These are the answers made to cer- 
tain questions in civil service examina- 
tions: 

One man was asked if he used in- 
toxicating liquors, and he said, "Yes. 
but not to success." 

An applicant for the fire department 
was asked to name three city depart- 
ments outside of police and fire. He 
said. "Department of Buildings, The 
Emporium and the White House." 

A woman applicant for a position 
as matron in a police station was asked 
what she would do if a woman hanged 
herself in a cell. She replied, "Sin- 
would cut her down and make, her 
comfortable until the doctor arrived." 

( me applicant for the police depart- 
ment was asked what was an ordi- 
nance, and he answered, "An ordinance 
is a large croud of people looking at 
a play " 

The next question was. "Who passes 
the ordinance-:'' and he said. "The 
ticket taker." 

An applicant for the police depart- 
ment was asked to define bigamy, and 
he said. "Bigamy was the marrying of 
a man to a woman knowing either of 
them to be alive." 

One applicant for the police depart- 
ment was asked under what conditions 
a policeman could carry liquor, and he 
answered. "Only incidentally ; that is. 
on the inside." 




N. W. CORNER 



FRANKLIN 2960 POLK AND POST STS. 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 

Wilson Bros. Co. 

Incorporated 

III! flf NARKBT STREET 

Bet. Frnnklln mid Gods* 

Telephone Park 271 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 21, 1925 




TfolaqgerjVi 



©well' 

Off 



MTIONAI CREST 



-tfte better it gets- 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 

1,800,000 cups 'were served at the Pan- 
ama Pacific International Exposition 



Have Your Car 

DUCO 

ENAMELED 

Our System Will Give a 

Permanent Luster 

Does Not Fade Nor Crack 

This We Guarantee 

See Our Demonstration Car 

Everluster Auto Enameling Co. 
946 Bush Street Franklin 2775 



'Our new process does it/ 



(Continued from Page 7) 
Capitol 

"White Collars" which is going into 
its tenth week at the Capitol, with no 
end in sight yet, is playing to capacity 
audiences, so Manager Cullen tells us. 

The premiere of this great play of 
the middle classes opens at the Cort 
Theater in New. York on February 23, 
and it is still playing to big houses 
down in Los Angeles. 

Producer Frank Egan, now in New 
York to attend the opening there, has 
given "White Collars" a splendid 
presentation here, with a strong cast, 
which brings out all of the fine points 
of this subtle satire. 



New Columbia 

"Sancho Panza", the big spectacular 
comedy in which Otis Skinner will ap- 
pear at the New Columbia for two 
weeks, commencing Monday night, is 
a costume play that contains much 
laughter, wit and humor. 

This drama of old Spain, written by 
Melchoir Lengyel, Hungarian play- 
wright, is based on certain episodes 
in Cervantes' "Don Quixote". It will 
have an elaborate production, and 
many beautiful dances. Special mu- 
sic has been written for it. 

In support of Otis Skinner will be 
seen Montague Rutherford, Henry V. 
Sternroyd, Herbert Deimore, Robert 
Rosaire. Lucile Middleton, Rubi Tre- 
lease, H. H. McCullum, Royal Cutter, 
Richard Cramer, Anthony Andre, Wal- 
ter Geer, Rawls Hampton, Hazel Glad- 
ding. Rosalind Baker and Harold 
Browne. 



Alcazar 

I predict that Henry Duffy and his 
splendid company of players will break 
all records for the run of their third 
vehicle which opened Sunday night at 
this popular theater. 

Arthur Goodrich's play, "So This Is 
London", gives the ever increasing 
followers of Henry Duffy the oppor- 
tunity of seeing him in an entirely dif- 
ferent characterization than in either 
"The Cat and the Canary" or in "Just 
Married". Instead of playing the lead, 
in this play Mr. Duffy plays a charac- 
ter role. — that of Sir Percy Beau- 
champ, an intolerant old English peer. 



Orpheum 

That merry old king of jazz himself, 
Ted Lewis, has created a sensation 
since his opening, Sunday night at the 
Orpheum. Mr. Lewis is assisted by 
his musical clowns and Miss Bobbe 
Arnst, coming direct from New York 
after a long season there. 

Another big feature will be Charles 
Kellogg, "The Nature Singer". Mr. 
Kellogg is the only known person in 
the world who is able to sing bird 
songs. 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Estate of DANIEL DENNEY. deceased. — 
No. 40952. Dept. No. 10. 

Notice is hereby given by the under- 
signed W. J. Hynes, administrator of 
the estate of DANIEL DENNEY de- 
ceased, to the creditors of and all persons 
having claims against the said decedent, to 
file them with the necessary vouchers within 
four (4) months after the first publication of 
this notice, in the office of the Clerk of the 
Superior Court of the State of California, in 
and for the City and County of San Francisco. 
or to exhibit them with the necessary 
vouchers within four (4) months after the 
first publication of this notice to the said 
administrator. Lit his office, 858 Phelan Build- 
ing, San Francisco. California, which said 
last-named office the undersigned selects as 
his place of business in all matters connected 
with said estate of DANIEL DENNEY. de- 
c. as.a. W. ,1. IIYNES. administrator of the 
estate of DANIEL DENNEY. deceased. 

Dated, San Francisco, California, February 
19th. 1925. 

CULUNAN & HICKEY, attorneys for ad- 
ministrator. 5t 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Estate of HARRY SHERIDAN, deceased. — 
No. 40939. Dept. No. 9. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, 
W. -T. Hynes. administrator of the estate of 
HARRY SHERIDAN deceased, to the cred- 
itors of and all persons having claims against 
the said decedent, to file them with the neces- 
sary vouchers within four (4) months after 
the first publication of this notice, in the 
office of the Clerk of the Superior Court of 
the State of California, in and for the City 
and County of San Francisco, or to exhibit 
them with the necessary vouchers within 
four (4) months after the first publication of 
this notice to the said administrator, at his 
office. B58 Phelan Building, San Francisco, 
California, which said last-named office the 
undersigned selects as his place of business in 
all matters connected with said estate of 
HARRY SHERIDAN, deceased. W. .1. HYNES, 
administrator of the estate of HARRY 
SHERIDAN, deceased. 

Dated. San Francisco, California, Februarv 
19th. 1925. 

CULLINAN & HICKEY, attorneys for ad- 
ministrator. 5t 



A farm which raises diamond-back 
terrapin for the market by thousands 
has been conducted for many years 
near Savannah, Ga. 




PIONEER 



The 
Name J 
on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete sat i sf ac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or sta- 
show 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
41 First Street, San Francisco 



Mail Advertising 
Specialists 

ACCURATE AND PROMPT 
SERVICE 

Andrews-Breeding Company 

Sutler 6224 

Room 801 Gillette Building 

830 MARKET STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



KOHLER & CHASE 

Established 1850 

THE AMPICO IN THE 
KNABE $1850 and Up 

FISCHER $1050 and Up 
F RANKLIN $845 and Up 

~ TERMS = 



Why Your Friends Own The AMPICO 

YOUR friends have become the possessors of the Ampico 
because they, like you and every one, love music. It is 
because they have found that a piano or player piano 
does not fill the demand for music in their homes. Even 
though there might have been an accomplished pianist in the 
family he cannot always be commanded to play as the 
Ampico can, nor is he always willing and ready, with music 
of all kinds, as the Ampico is. 

For those long weeks when Nature turns her austere side 
toward us and we feel the chill of her change of mood and 
withdraw to the shelter of home and cluster about the fire- 
side, there is a certain lure to enchant us and carry us far on 
the road to happiness and that is Music. Well has Music 



been called the greatest of the Arts, beginning indeed where 
the others leave off for she vibrates in accord with them all 
and goes far beyond them all. 

She bears us to the Isles of Romance and takes us by the 
hand into moonlit gardens and we walk with her by the 
blue sea and feel the fresh wind in our faces. She takes us 
gayly dressed to the Carnival. She recreates for us the 
strange sounds of the Orient. We stand by the cradle as the 
mother sings to her babe. We dance, we laugh, we sing and 
even weep with her who holds in her powerful grasp all our 
joys, all our emotions and plays on them as she will. 

Music in its effect on man has a greater power than any 
other single influence and a home in which music dwells is 
a real home. 

We would tell you how the Ampico brings this, the 
divinest of the Arts to dwell under your roof. The keen 
enjoyment that it brings may be obtained at a compara- 
tively small outlay. It costs very little more than the price 
of the recordings for its upkeep. It depreciates in value 
very slowly and will continue its usefulness for many years 
and during its lifetime will prove to be an unending source 
of pleasure. 

Creating as it does a musical atmosphere in the home and 
contributing to the joy of the entire family, it is difficult to 
estimate the return for the investment which the Ampico 
will bring. 



Sacramento 
Fresno 



KOHLER & CHASE 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

1850 — 75 Years in California — 1925 



Oakland 
San Jose 



"RICKENBACKER" 



COUPE 

Model C 



Driven Only 800 Miles. 
Completely Equipped. 
Perfect Condition. 
Guaranteed, Good as New. 

Owner leaving city — will sell at sacrifice. 
Terms if necessary. Original cost, $2,390. 

MAKE OFFER 

Car will be demonstrated by appointment. 

Box 36 

NEWS LKTTER 




AUTHORIZED 

AUTO 
RE-FINISHING 

STATION 



TOPS 

SEAT COVERS 

ENCLOSURES 

UPHOLSTERING 

BODY BUILDING 

REPAIRING 



«^- 



-JH» 



American Auto Painting Co. 

Incorporated 

Van Ness Avenue at Eddy Street 
Wh. B. Gibson, Mgr. Prospect 42' n. 



«&*- 



^5* 



■ 







Sg 1 "" 'Sg t 



3 Q 



Where Quality Costs Less 



At the factory where mattresses 
are made is the best place to buy 
your mattress. The quality of our 
products, we believe, is above ques- 
tion. With quality assurance you 
get the advantage of the actual fac- 
tory price. 

The money yon would pay for a 
very poorly built mattress at a 
store will buy a high-grade and 
fully guaranteed mattress here. Many 
different models from which to 
choose— $11.75 to $47.50. 



Craftsman-Built 
Hair Mattress 

FACTORY %f\ A 

PRICE _ ZfTT, 

FULLY GUARANTEED 

Positively the biggest value in a 
hair mattress obtainable; 4^ inches 
thick; fine grade licking; gives long 
service and satisfaction; stores ask 
532 for equal quality. 

Free delivery — city or country 






<3s 



^ d|,McRosRey 

1506 Market St., Corner Van Ness (No Branches) 






Golden Gate Ferry Company 


FOOT 


OF HYDE STREET, SAN FRANC 


,ISCO 




WINTER SCHEDULE 






TIME TABLE 






EFFECTIVE OCTOBER 15, 1924 




Leave 


Sausalito 


Leave San 


Francisco 


A.M. 


P.M. 


(Hyde Street) 


6:00 


12:30 


A.M. 


P.M. 


6:30 


1:00 


6:30 


12:30 


7.00 


1:30 


7:00 


1:00 


7:30 


2:00 


7:30 


1:30 


8:00 


3:00 


8:00 


2:00 


8:30 


4:00 


8:30 


2:30 


9:00 


4:30 


9:00 


3:30 


9:30 


5:00 


9:30 


4:30 


10:00 


5:30 


10:00 


5:00 


10:30 


6:00 


10:30 


5:30 


11:00 


6:30 


11:00 


6:00 


11:30 


7:00 


11:30 


6:30 


12:00 


7:30 


12:00 


7:00 




8:0( 




7:30 




8:30 




8:00 




9:00 




8:30 




9:30 




9:00 




10:30 




9:30 




11:30 




10:00 
11:00 
12:00 


Special Service When 


Traffic Requirements 




Make N 


:cessary. 




Golden Gate Ferry Company 

: 
---■■.■■■■...■■■■...■... ................... ..I 






j "The Father of 

1 

i Our Country" 



{ "In the Good 



j Old Days' 



Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 



Is a very timely and interesting page in next Sunday's 
rotagravure section, showing some of the big events in 
the life of 'Washington; there is also a page of interest- 
ing personalities in "Pictorial America." many of whom 
you will recognize. 



Gives graphic illustrations of the autos of early days: 
there are bea_ ;'ul snow scenes, "In Winter's Grip"; 
some "Fashions of Spring"; many "Personalities of 
Note"; cinemaland furnishes attractive "Stars and 
Brides." and there are other interesting pictures from 
"Far Away." Don't miss The 



■ ■ ■ ■ M ■ 


■ m aw m m ■ h ■ ■ 


BUY IT TODAY! 

"CHECKER" STOCK 

"PLUS" STOCK 

WHV? Because in buying it at $10 a share 
W 11 I . you get a dividend-paying investment, 
with unlimited possibilities for advancement in price, 
and part-ownership in a successful going business with 
wonderful development still ahead of it. You cannot 
afford to pass up this opportunity to obtain some stock 
in CHECKER CAB CO. of San Francisco. The original 
$10 shares in a similar Eastern concern are worth $800 
today. ACT NOW. Without obligation send today for 
all information or mail check for your shares — orders 
accepted for one or more. We want as many boosters 
as possible. 


"Ride in 
Your Own 
Cab 
and Pay 
Yourself 
a Profit" 


J. \. iialdi. President 

Checker Cab In. 

I04S California St., San Francisco. 

[ ] I am interested. Please send full 

deta il^. 
[ ] Please reserve for me Shares 

of stock at $10 a share. 




N. L.— 2-21-2S 







PRICE 10 CENTS ~ ~~ $5.00 PER YEAR 

California Advertiser 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1925 



LOS ANGELES 




Good wo Evil, Conflicting Forces in "Pageant of Youth," Musical Masque. 

to have seven great performances, April I to 5, San Francisco Civic Auditorium, for the benefit of St. 

Ignatius College. Miss May Linehan as Heavenly Love and George Mayrrlr as Evil. 



KOHLER & CHASE 

Established 1850 

THE AM PI CO IN THE 
KNABE $ 1 8SO and Up 

FISCHER $1050 and Up 
FRANKLIN $845 and Up 

16 . ■ TERMS =* 



Why Your Friends Own The AMPICO 

YOUR friends have become the possessors of the Ampico 
because they, like you and every one, love music. It is 
because they have found that a piano or player piano 
does not fill the demand for music in their homes. Even 
though there might have been an accomplished pianist in the 
family he cannot always be commanded to play as the 
Ampico can, nor is he always willing and ready, with music 
of all kinds, as the Ampico is. 

For those long weeks when Nature turns her austere side 
toward us and we feel the chill of her change of mood and 
withdraw to the shelter of home and cluster about the fire- 
side, there is a certain lure to enchant us and carry us far on 
the road to happiness and that is Music. Well has Music 



been called the greatest of the Arts, beginning indeed where 
the others leave off for she vibrates in accord with them all 
and goes far beyond them all. 

She bears us to the Isles of Romance and takes us by the 
hand into moonlit gardens and we walk with her by the 
blue sea and feel the fresh wind in our faces. She takes us 
gayly dressed to the Carnival. She recreates for us the 
strange sounds of the Orient. We stand by the cradle as the 
mother sings to her babe. We dance, we laugh, we sing and 
even weep with her who holds in her powerful grasp all our 
joys, all our emotions and plays on them as she will. 

Music in its effect on man has a greater power than any 
other single influence and a home in which music dwells is 
a real home. 

We would tell you how the Ampico brings this, the 
divinest of the Arts to dwell under your roof. The keen 
enjoyment that it brings may be obtained at a compara- 
tively small outlay. It costs very little more than the price 
of the recordings for its upkeep. It depreciates in value 
very slowly and will continue its usefulness for many years 
and during its lifetime will prove to be an unending source 
of pleasure. 

Creating as it does a musical atmosphere in the home and 
contributing to the joy of the entire family, it is difficult to 
estimate the return for the investment which the Ampico 
will bring. 



Sacramento 
Fresno 



KOHLER & CHASE 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

1850—75 Years in California— 1925 



Oakland 
Sax Jose 




Fast Service 

To SACRAMENTO 

—only 3 hours, 15 minutes this way 

Take advantage of this comfortable, convenient 
daily service to Sacramento — via Oakhnd. Rich- 
mond and Benichi. 



$3.52 

roundtrip to Sacra- 
mento; go Sunday 
—return not later 
than 6:55 a.m. train 
Monday. 

$4.35 

roundtrip to Sacra- 
ment; go Salurd:i> 
or Sunday; return 
not later than 6:55 
a. m. train Tuesday. 



Morning 



Lv. San Francisco ' Ferr\ I 



Ar. Sacramento 



7 :40 a.m. "Sacramento Special" 10:55 a.m. 

Evening 

5:00 p.m. The "El Dorado" 8:15 p.m. 
i Smoker, coaches, Southern Pacific dining car, 

observation car. I 

1 Another trains daily -including the famous 
±U -NEWSBOY" which leaves San Francisco at 
1:20 a. m. and arrives Sacramento al 7:00 a. m. 
'Sacramento sleeper open for occupancy 9:00 p m 
(Oakland Pier I 

Similar comfortable, convenient service returning. 
For further information, ask 

Southern Pacific 

Ferry Station 65 Geary Street Third St. Station 

Sutter 4000 



Time 




Card ! 



THE DEPENDABLE AlITOJIODTLE FERRY Route ofTera 
inntnriNtM the Mhnrtent and most direct mennM of trnnuporta- 
tlon from Oakland. San Francl»co, and nil pointM noitth, to 
Vnllejo, Snrrnmi'nto, Sonoma. Xapn nnd l,nke Counties and 
nil point* north. 



Leave 


Onkl 


nnd 


111 








Side 


nt 




O 


Slde 


at 


"SHOUT 


■WAY" 


> 


MOIIKOW 


COVE 


A.M. 








P.M. 


cc 


A.M. 


P.M. 


tO:<K> 








2:40 


HI 


t.-.:4.-, 


2:20 


G:30 








3:00 


in 


0:15 


2:40 


7:00 








3:20 




0:45 


3:00 


7:30 








3:40 


Ul 


7:15 


3:20 


8:00 








4:00 


h 


7:45 


3:40 


8:20 








4:20 


D 


8:20 


4:00 


8:40 








4:40 


Z 


8:40 


4:20 


0:00 








5:00 




0:00 


4:40 


0:20 








5:20 


2 


0:20 


5:00 


0:40 








5:40 




0:40 


5:20 


10:00 








0:00 


X 


10:00 


5:40 


10:20 








0:20 




10:20 


0:00 


10:40 








0:40 


I 


10:40 


0:20 


11 :00 








7:00 


1 
> 

< 


11:00 


0:40 


11:20 








7:20 


11:20 


7:00 


11:40 








7:40 


11:40 


7:20 


NOON 








8:00 


5 


NOON 


7:45 


12:00 








8:30 




12:00 


8:15 


P.M. 








0:00 


h- 


P.M. 


8:45 


12:20 








0:30 


K 


12:20 


0:15 


12:40 








10:00 


O 


12:40 


0:45 


1:00 








10 :30 


I 


1:00 


10:15 


1:20 








11:00 


CO 


1:20 


10:45 


1:40 








•11:30 




1 :40 


•11:15 


2:00 








•12:00 


111 


2:00 


•11:45 


2:20 








•12:30 
•1:00 


I 




•12:15 
•11:45 



•Saturdays. Sundays. Holidays — Extra Trips During Heavy 
I'rnllle. t Sundays and Holidays only. 

AVEN .1. HANFORD. Pres. nnd Gen. Met. 



f.«»W1ih.d July 10. Ifttt 

Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

The ¥un Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 80, 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott,. 

Jr.. from 1SS4 to 1925. Is now printed and published by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 335 Montgomery St., San Francisco, California. Telephone 

Douglas 6S53. Entered at San Francisco, California. Posl Office as Becond-class matter. London Office: Street A Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C. Lond« n. 

England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year. $5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, J6.00. 





Vol. CVI 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1925 



No. 9 



— Apropos of the fact that the "superior races" are dying 
out, like the Greek and Roman civilization, it is stated by 
authentic sources that "Unless the British population in- 
creases sufficiently, it will not be able to populate, and, 
therefore, ultimately to own the land that it now possesses." 



— We never admired Austin Dobson, English poet laure- 
ate very much, but we simply have to agree with these lines 
of his : 

"Time goes, you say? Ah, no, 
Alas, time stays. We go." 



— The Board of Public Works should jolt the property 
owners in the downtown district regarding the number 
of glass squares in the sidewalks that are conspicuous by 
their absence. These little holes are just the right size 
to catch the heels of the unwary and throw them ignom- 
inously to the ground. 

* * * 

— One thousand persons died from famine in China, 
which is nice news for a country so very old in civilization, 
as it is, to send over the world. China as a race cares little, 
evidently, about the preservation of the health and life of 
itself. We must say this because of the numerous famines, 
starvations and fights among its robber generals. 



— Here is a definition of genius, by Sir Edmund < iosse : 
"The paradox and miracle of talent or genius comes in 
when the person, who sees best how complex, diverse and 
eternal is even the fall of the leaf, most sternly seizes on 
the salient and significant in things as they are, here and 
now, to us all. and says it with the sharpest effect-." 



— There is such a thing as being too analytical, and we 
must accept certain pleasurable emotions or demonstrations 
or ceremonies with an uncritical mental eye. < Itherwise, 
through a too accurate or carping spirit, we lose a lot ol 
fun in life, and gain nothing eventually, for ourselves. The 
aspect of Nature is often beautiful at a distance, but ex- 
amine her too closely, and we find the inevitable worm ; the 
inescapable slime, and ever active dominion of the strong 
over the weak. 



— A drive down the peninsula will convince the most 

casual observer that all the furore occasioned about a year 
agO in connection with the sign-board nuisance ■ • 1 1 Inch 

ways throughout the country, was unproductive in it~ re- 
sults. The Standard ( hi Company gained many a press 
eulogy in taking the initiative and removing it > bill board 
advertising except at service stations, and from what we 
read we hoped that most of the other miscreants would fol- 
low suit. Still, the signs flourish like hideous weeds, and 
make El C amino Real, instead of a beautiful drive through 
some of the prettiest scenery in the state, merely an ugly 
advertising medium for corn plasters, "hot-dogs" and what 
not. 



— "Home or Jail," says Probation Officer Otis of Mon- 
terey County to the youths who visit dance halls in that 
vicinity, found abroad after twelve o'clock at night. But 
the trouble is that sometimes there isn't much choice be- 
tween the two. 

— Now isn't Roumania the wise little camouflager? Has 
a little war flurry so she can borrow money from the 
U. S. A. Never so much as within the last few years, has 
the appellation "Uncle" Sam seemed so appropriate a title 
for our national head. 

— In 1014, when the Chinese Consul made a tour through 
various English possessions, he remarked: "I saw more 
trees than men. The Almighty gave Australia to the 
Australians, and they could not use it, so He took it way 
from them and gave it to the English. If the English 
do not use it, He will doubtless take it away from them." 



— Have you noticed the dirty and disreputable looking 
flags that have been displayed lately? One in particular, 
flying from a building in the downtown district, affronts the 
eve. It is not only dingy in color, but is torn clear across, 
t )f course, if it has been through the war, we salute it with 
more respect, but if it has not, there is no excuse for its 
being unfurled, and we would advise the owners to read up 
on the ethics of the flying of flags. On the last two birth- 
days of our great men. too many "stars and stripes" were 
in a like deplorable state. We like to see "< )ld Glory" bright, 
gleaming and above all, — clean! 
* * * 

— The "Daily (English) Chronicle" ha> a special corres- 
pondent who has just returned from an extensive trip 
throughout Russia, and he gives an interesting review of 
Russian conditions. "When the ruling cliques in Russia 
tell the world that they have beaten Trotsky, they protest 
loo much." says he; "Trotsky realize-; the failure of Com- 
munism, and the Triumvirate does not. . . . this ener- 
getic and brilliant man of action is by no means at the end 
of his resources . . stories about his health are much 

exaggerated . . . the Communist machinery of State 
production is slowing down and will presently stop . . . 
all that keeps the economic life of the country going is the 
non-Communist efforts of the peasantry who raise crops 
and breed cattle for gain . . when disillusion is com- 

plete, there will be a demand for Trotsky's recall." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 2K, 1925 




The franc wobbles more than ever. 
The Wobbling Franc It has been more or less on the 

shake ever since the armistice, but 
later it has given token of even greater insecurity. Why 
does it shake? The country is rich in itself; the peasantry 
is a well placed peasantry, and the industry of France has 
been better than that of almost any country, relatively 
speaking, in, the last seven years. The franc goes down and 
then Mr. Brisbane, who is so sagacious, says that we must 
not invest in European securities. The franc goes up and 
the very astute. Mr. Brisbane again says that it is silly to 
think that the richness of a country like France will not in- 
evitably find its echo in a stable currency. Clever Mr. Bris- 
bane! But still the franc goes up and down and only recent- 
ly was practically rehabilitated by the horrid Americans 
and the hated British. Now, just why? One thing is cer- 
tain ; the French bankers play fast and loose with the franc 
in politics as no other financiers would ever dare to do with 
their country's currency, and it is just that which makes us 
doubtful about that patriotism which flashes so nobly 
among the average of the French people. The last fall came 
and the bankers would not co-operate in the rehabilitation 
of the franc, except upon the terms which they offered, that 
is to say, the exemption of a large portion of corporate 
profits from taxation. The concession by the government to 
the demands of the bankers will play the very deuce witli 
the budget and will render a balancing practically impossi- 
ble. But the government had to give way because the needs 
are such and French finance is in such an unfortunate posi- 
tion that the least upset would dislodge the fabric and place 
the country financially hors de combat. It may lie very 
smart to take advantage of this crisis in the affairs of one's 
country and to embarrass one's government in the transac- 
tion, but there are at least grave doubts as to the patriotism 
of the act. 



Some of our people are getting worried 
Stimulating Art because we do not show that apprecia- 
tion of the fine arts which they think be- 
longs to us, as a people, and without which we cannot lift 
our heads up among the nations. This is all very pathetic 
and, particularly so, when it takes the form of recommend- 
ing a "Buy a Picture Week" by which we should get to 
work and put our money as a charitable expenditure into 
the possession of the artists. The idea is bad from every 
angle. It is no part of an artist's life to be artificially cod- 
dled and kept alive like a premature baby in an incubator. 
If we do not patronize our artists it is because we do not 
care for art and, such being the case, there is nothing to do 
about it, for the notion of Mr. Midas and his wife going out 
and, as a matter of social duty, buying a picture for which 
the)' have no call in their own nature, is very ridiculous 
and quite unseemly. Perhaps we do have more art feeling 
than we are aware of, but it expresses itself in other ways 
than those to which we are accustomed to associate with 
that very priggish and indefinite term. If our painters do 
not appeal to us so that we do not spend money on pictures, 
that may be the fault of our painters, who have not so far 
learned in what way to appeal to us and to tell us some- 
thing which we need to feel by their art. After all, painters 
depend upon their patrons as they have depended from 
time immemorial. What one patron likes, another may dis- 
like in spite of the fact that as "art," the two products may 
be equally good. But the artist who could not satisfy his 
patron went hungry, even in the glorious days of great 
Italian art. 



There is evidently going to 
The Federal Inheritance Tax be a clash in the next Con- 
gress over the federal in- 
heritance tax and there are evidences that it may lead to a 
serious split in the Republican majority, which appears to 
be quite divided on the question. The President has taken 
a strong line in favor of the abolition altogether of the fed- 
eral inheritance tax and favors the leaving of the matter in 
the hands of the individual states. Many republican leaders, 
among whom Representative Green of Iowa, is prominent, 
have taken a very strong position against the presidential 
program. This representative is chairman of the Ways and 
Means Committee and is a powerful figure in Washington. 
The democrats will, of course, oppose the presidential meas- 
ure, which has the approval of Mr. Mellon. There is no 
doubt as to the general approval <>i the reduction of income 
taxes, but the matter of inheritance taxes stands on another 
footing. The assistant secretary of the Treasury, Chas. S. 
Dewey, has already taken the field actively on behalf of the 
measure which has the support of his chief, and declares 
that the federal inheritance taxes are a hindrance to initia- 
tive. Of course, if that is true with respect to the federal 
taxes on inheritance, it must also be true with respect to 
the state taxes for the same purpose, but there dues not 
seem to be any tendency to agitate against them. As re- 
gards the presidential opinion, we should be much inclined 
to favor it on the grounds which we have always taken — 
that the less federal interference in matters which can be 
regulated by the states themselves, the better. A sweeping 
federal inheritance tax law enforced by the federal government, 
quite independently of the particular conditions which pre- 
vail in the individual states, has always seemed to us a 
rather dictatorial proceeding. As the President says, it is 
better to call socialism by its proper name than to label one 
of its manifestations as an inheritance tax. 



There is talk about Mr. Merrick. 
The French Embassy our present ambassador to France, 

giving up the post, and of course 
under such circumstances a successor is also talked about. 
There have been reports in some of the Eastern papers that 
the post might be offered to William H. Crocker. He on 
his part says that he knows nothing about it; which is quite 
like him, for we have had few men in our history as careless 
of distinction and as fine in independence as Mr. Crocker. 
But we should like to see Mr. Crocker in that position, 
needless to say, which is one of the most important of all 
positions. An ambassador of the United States in Paris, is 
in a peculiarly advantageous position to do much good and 
to exercise a very important influence on the progress of 
the world. We cannot imagine a finer influence than that of 
Mr. Crocker who has the respect and esteem of all here. He 
has, moreover, in the marriage of his daughter with Count 
Andre de Limur. a French diplomat at present in London, 
a tie with the European service which is just invaluable, 
so much in Europe depending upon such connections. It 
would be hard to find a more suitable man for the Paris 
post, or one more likely to do honor to the community in 
which he has paid s,, conspicuous a part for so many years. 
We lost one great ambassador when Mr. Phelan refused 
to go to Vienna. We have always had the idea that he, 
with that curiously fine grasp of affairs which, with a broad 
scholarship, brings him closer to the ideal of a diplomat 
than almost anyone else in the country, would have exer- 
cised a very salutary influence on affairs. From another 
angle the same conclusion may be reached in the case of 
Mr. Crocker. We are not always successful in our states- 
men from California, and, without being rude or imperti- 
nent, we may, perhaps, say that our Secretary of the Navy- 
leaves much to be desired. But we have the talent and the 
knowledge here which the government can utilize and as 
citizens of the United States as well as Californians. we 
should like to see Mr. Crocker at Paris. 



February 28, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



There is more or less well defined 
The Air Mail Terminus fear that the air mail terminus is 

to be removed from San Fran- 
cisco ami located at Concord. There appears to be a very 

considerable amount of secrecy over the whole matter and 
it would look as if those responsible did not like to face the 
storm of protest which is sure to break out. and justly so, 
when the proposed change is actually made. < >ne thing is 
certain, that what promised at first to he a mere temporary 
change, a matter of sixty days or so, hears all the marks of 
a well defined plan to establish the terminus in the Contra 
Costa town, of course to the detriment of this city. The 
permanency of the structures now going up at Concord are 
corroborative of the rumors afloat. An emergency landing 
place at Concord might be a very useful adjunct to the mail 
service, we do not question that, but, as a matter of certain- 
ty, there is no advantage as a permanent base in Concord 
over this city. It would he interesting to know just what 
are the governmental rights in the air filled at Concord, for 
from that knowledge we might have some idea of the inten- 
tions of the government. The wdiole affair is a bit mysteri- 
ous and there is no doubt that in the neighborhood of Con- 
cord, at least, there is a very well defined impression that 
the field is to be their permanent asset. This must rest upon 
some grounds, or otherwise how does it exist? The mere 
rumor that the government intended to establish a tem- 
poral - )' and experimental base at that point could not in it- 
self have generated so firm a conviction. The removal of 
the air terminus from this city would be an affront, as it 
rests upon no real foundation, for between Concord and San 
Francisco there are no climatic differences which would 
make for the change and give a preponderance to the smaller 
city. As the metropolis of this part of the state, at least, we 
are entitled to maintain the governmental recognition as an 
air mail terminus. 



It would seem as if the bureaucrats 
More Bureaucracy grew fatter and then wanted more bur- 
eaucrats, for there is no limit to their 
demand upon the rest of us for money and position. For 
example, there is a proposition to create a new federal offi- 
cial who will rejoice in the name of "Secretary for Educa- 
tion and Relief." We shall soon be emulating the Germans 
and the Russians in the length of the names of our bureau- 
cratic officers. The Russians, however under stress of cir- 
cumstances, have learnt the trick of turning a long name 
into a shortish one by just stringing the first syllables of the 
component parts of the name one after the other. But with 
all due respect to those estimable gentlemen who like long 
winded appellations for tyrannical officials, we must whis- 
per softly, for so many things are suspected nowadays and 
the spies of bureaucracy swarm everywhere, that we really 
do nut want any more such officials, and we can get along 
very well without the Secretary fur Education and Relief. 
The idea behind this job is to centralize and bureaucratize 
the education of the country and to put into the hands of 
the federal government the machinery of education which 
has up to now been the prerogative, nay the elementary 
right, of the separate states. With the control of education 
goes (be propaganda, which is inseparable from education, 
and we. herein and in other states in the same position as 
ourselves, would be overwhelmed by that bureaucrcy liv- 
ing and working three thousands miles away, without any 
realization of our needs and quite indifferent to our social 
requirements. Goodness alone knows what they mean by 
"relief!" It has a suspicious sound. Those who offer relief 
usually at the same time are arrogant and invasive. We 
know what relief means, and we of the West are self-re- 
specting people who need no relief and would rather be ex- 
cused from bureaucratic bullying. Representative Garrett 
of Tennessee has taken a strong stand against this new 
bureaucratic aggression and we are with him. 



Federation of Women's Clubs Protest 

The City and County Federation of Women- Clubs nrcntK 
passed resolutions urging the purchase of the Market Street 
Railway Company bj the City so that the City might receive 
the street car improvements and betterments that can only be 
had from a unified system. 

This Federation which represents die cream of active women 
in the city maintains that San Francisco is greatly impeded 
in its progress by the lack of proper transportation facilities 
which compels people to live across the bay. that street car ex- 
tensions are necessary, that universal transfers are required, 
that the Market street situation is about intolerable and thai 
the city should have the line to San Mateo, none of which things 
are possible under the present system. 

The only cure for these evils is found by the Federation to 
lie in the unification of the street railway systems under the 
ownership of the City and the arguments of the Club ended 
in the conclusion "That it is imperative for San Francisco 
that our street railway systems be unified without further delay 
under the ownership of the City by having the City acquire 
the privately owned street railway properties, the earnings 
thereof to be applied on the purchase price." 

No investigator of present conditions could reach any other 
conclusion. 



— Our national leaders seem to be trying not only figura- 
tively, but literally, to be emulating the "Man with the 
Hoe" and his ilk. Some of them perform the "farmer fan- 
tasy" not only before election, but after their office is se- 
cured. Whether this tendency is natural, or whether it is 
just a play to the gallery, they all show an inclination to go 
clown to the old wood lot and throw some loose dirt or a 
few chips around. And slowly but surely these particular 
lines from Markham's immortal poem become more fitting 
to the President of this great country. — "And on his back 
the burden of the world." 

* * * 

— Mrs. Asquith and other people of note in London, are 
solving the slum problem by razing the shacks and building 
modern tenements, from which they devolve a fair amount 
of sheckels in the form of rents. It is said that San Fran- 
cisco has no slum question, but we believe if property 
owners would abolish some of the eyesores of our city in the 
way of ramshackle buildings, and put up neat, modern flats. 
the improvement in the general contour of the streets 
would lie noticeable. There are still several "temporary" 
huts left over from the great fire, even on such streets as 
Broadway, and some "invisible power" keeps them there, 
although we have a faint recollection that some bill or other 
was passed long ago. for the removal of all such nuisances. 

* * * 

The University Fine Arts Society held their usual salon 
yesterday at the Fairmont Motel, at two o'clock, the fea- 
ture of the afternoon being a lecture by Major Vivian 
Gilbert, the English soldier, who -poke on "The Romance 
of the Last Crusade," the inside story of the capture of 
Jerusalem. ( hi Friday afternoon, March twentieth. Miss 
Laura Sherry will give a costume recital of French Dialect 
-ketches and old French songs. 

* * * 

— The argument against the insurance taxes seems to be 
well founded and the pyramiding process which goes on 
puts the weight more and more on one of the most beneficial 
and important of modern enterprises. It is computed that 
laxes on life insurance premiums have increased practically 
two and a half times since 1915. At the same time that taxes 
have increased ability of supervision has declined. As one 
writer puts it. "There is a limit to the endurance of the 
s. undest and best managed business" and thrift and the 
protective instinct may be discouraged by the exaction- of 
the politicians. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 28, 1925 




>LEj4SUI$'SW4ND 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ Tom Moone, 




opened at the New Columbia in 
founded on a certain portion of Cer- 
It is a fantastic play with a 



New Columbia 

OTIS SKINNER 
"Sanchp Panza" 
vante's novel, "Don Quixote 
prologue and four acts. 

Sancho Panza and his faithful donkey, Dapple, fill the 
stage. The humble philosophy of the simple goatherd 
gives one something to think about — it is indeed strange 
how in a day when monarchies reigned supreme, Cervantes 
should look ahead and see the day when the man who gave 
— not took — the most, would rule the world. 

Mr. Skinner is splendid as Sancho Panza and altogether 
it is a lavish production. There is a large cast, but in spots 
I could not hear what they were saying, as the music 
drowned them out. The settings and costumes are gor- 
geous, and extremely striking in color and design. 



By Katherine Schwartz 
Formerly of the "Chicago Tribune" 

the assistance of his Musical Clowns and charming Bobbe 
Arnst, he will offer a complete change of program for his 
final week. 

On the bill with him will be "Signor Friscoe and his 
famous Guatemalan Ensemble; the Lorraine Sisters with 
Roy Sheldon and Billy Taylor in a novel offering of dance 
and song; Leon Kimberly and Helen Page will be seen in 
an amusing skit called "The Heart Broker"; Birdie Reeve, 
world's champion typist, has an interesting act; Al Fields 
and Johnny Johnston will entertain with "Terry and ferry" ; 
the Australian Nendozas in "The Globe of Fate" have a 
thrilling act; Robin and Hood complete the bill with a 
fantasy. 



Beatty's Casino 

"Trouping With Ellen", starring Flelen Chadwick, will be 
the feature at Beatty's Casino the coming week. It is a 
picturization of Earl Derr Biggers' Saturday Evening Post 
story of the same title, and a fascinating tale of the Ameri- 
can stage girl who proves to be entirely different from the 
accepted type of a young lady of the chorus. Others in the 
cast are Gaston Glass, Mary Thurman, Basil Rathbone, 
Zeena Keefe. Tyrone Power, Riley Hatch and others. 

Eva Fav, well known mind reader, heads the vaudeville 
acts. 



Alcazar 

"So This Is London", the splendid comedy now running 
at the Alcazar, played to crowded houses the first two 
weeks of its run, and goes into the third week with no 
abatement of its popularity. 

The play has a most entertaining plot based upon the 
prejudices entertained by one country for another. It is 
touched here and there with some truths concerning the 
cause of happiness and the futility of nations in waiving 
their respective flags in one another's faces. 



Curran Theatre Symphony Concert 

Walter Ferner, solo cellist, was the most attractive part 
of the program at the pair of concerts given the past week, 
playing with dignity and surety, the very difficult concerto 
for cello by Lalo. The more we hear this splendid artist. 
the more we are impressed with San Francisco's good for- 
tune; he plays the most difficult passages with absolute 
ease and confidence, yet loses nothing of beauty in the 
more melodious ones. 



Capitol 

"White Collars" goes into the eleventh week of its run 
at the Capitol, next week. Both the play and the players 
enact their individual roles with perfection. 

Two of the most emphatic hits of the production are 
scored by Earl Lee as Cousin Henry and Marion Aye as 
the little flapper. 



Roland Hayes 

Roland Hayes has a voice like an organ, perfect diction, 
dramatic as well as lyric qualities, and on Sunday afternoon 
he gave a perfect demonstration of the art of singing. He 
gave an interesting and well selected program, and anyone 
who did not have an opportunity of hearing him last week, 
should certainly take advantage of the opportunity of hear- 
ing him tomorrow at the Columbia Theater in the 
afternoon. 



Pantages 

Edna Wallace Hopper, the sixty-two year old flapper, is 
the headliner at the Pantages this week. She is her own 
best testimonial. Not only does she look like a young 
flapper, but she acts like one. 

Her act is quite interesting and beautifully presented. 
It is programmed as having been written by Raymond 
Hitchcock and of course it contains a world of laughs. 



Curran 

Anna Pavlowa opens for a week's engagement at the 
Curran Monday evening in a new repertoire, most beauti- 
ful and effective. The schedule is so arranged as to comprise 
the favorite ballets presented here by the Russian danseuse 
in the past, but in addition there are several new offerings, 
and a number of revivals not done here the past few vears. 



Wilkes 

On next Tuesday evening Harry Carroll's Musical Revue. 
"Pickings" will be presented at the Wilkes Theatre follow- 
ing Kolb and Dill who close tonight. The attraction 
comes to San Francisco after a long engagement to capac- 
ity business in Los Angeles. 

Written by Ballard Macdonald, "Pickings" is a series of 
comedy episodes in which a company of Broadway stars 
and vaudeville headliners have an opportunity to make 
much fun and laughter. 



Orpheum 

Ted Lewis, who has broken all records at the Orpheum, 
has been retained over for the third and last week. With 



Golden Gate 

This popular house, in keeping with fine bills which they 
have offered during the past season, have assembled an- 
other all star vaudeville and photoplay bill for the comiftg 
week. 

Harry Roye and Billee Maye and their company will be 
seen in their new revue. "Dance. Color and Speed"; Dave 



February 28, 1925 



AXI) CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 



ALCAZAR 1 
O'Farrell nr. Powell ( 


"So This Is 
London'" 


ALEXANDRIA 1 
18th and Geary | 


Pictures 


CALIFORNIA l 
4th and Market J 


The Redeeming Sin 


CAMEO 1 
936 Market St. ] 


"Flying Hoofs" 


CAPITOL 1 

64 Ellis St. 


"White Collars" 


BEATTY'S 1 

casino y 

Ellis and Mason > 


"Trouping 
With Ellen" 


CASTRO 1 


Pictures 


NEW 1 
COLUMBIA \ 
Eddy and Mason > 


Otis Skinner 

"Sancho Panza" 


CURRAN 1 
Geary, Nr. Mason 


Pavlowa 


GRANADA 1. 
1066 Market St. J 


'Coming Through" 


GOLDEN GATE] 
G. G. Ave. and Taylor J 


Vaudeville and 
Pictures 


IMPERIAL I 
1077 Market St. J 


"The 
Thundering Herd" 


LOEWS ] 
WARFIELD [ 
988 Market St. J 


"A Thief in 
Paradise" 


METROPOLITAN I 

2055 Union St. J 


Pictures 


NEW FILLMORE l 
NEW MISSION J 


Pictures 


ORPHEUM 1 
O'Farrell and PowellJ 


Vaudeville 


PANTAGES I 
Market at Mason 


Vaudeville 
Pictures 


PORTOLA r 


Pictures 

Program ChimtCfd 
Dull) 


ROYAL ] 
1529 Polk St. J 


Pictures 


PLAYERS I 
THEATRE J 


Dale Stock Co. 

"Bought and 
Paid For" 


STRAND 1 
965 Market St. 


Pictures and 
Vaudeville 


UNION 1 

SQUARE f- 

(Hippodrome) ^ 


Pictures 


WILKES \ 

t Formerly f*enry) 
Geary and Mason J 


Hnrry Carroll's 

"Pickings'" 


WIGWAM J> 


Pictures 



Ferguson, well-known comedian, has 
a splendid comedy entitled, "The 
Lucky Stiff"; "Kavortings Uneek", a 
melange of song and fun is offered by 
Sylvia Clark; "Senator Ford", well- 
known monologist from Michigan, 
will discuss all the topics of the day; 
Walter and Emily Waters, talented 
ventriloquists, have a unique offering; 
Manning and Class "off the floor 
dancers", executed difficult dance steps 
on a wire; the feature to be seen on 
the screen is Booth Tarkington's "The 
Turmoil", with Eleanor Boardman and 
George Hockathorne. There will also 
be short films and Claude Sweeten and 
his orchestra will play an overture. 

Players Theatre 
Dale Stock Co. 



Concerts 




LUCY SCHUMANN 

lu "Pollyannn", stuffed liy 
The Dale Stock Co. 

The Dale Stock Company, headed 
by Virginia Dale as director, and Lu- 
cille Schumann, leading lady, opened 
Sunday evening in "Pollyanna", and 
have been doing nicely all week. Sup- 
porting them are Harry Brandes, Mor- 
timer Snow, Wallace Scott, Dolcie 
Gale, and Fred Colegraff. The coming 
week they will give "Bought and Paid 
For", and the third week "Ming Toi" 
will be -given. 



Theatre Arts Club 

The Theatre Arts Club gave their 
initial production in their new home — 
The Players Theatre — last Friday 
night, and a packed house greeted 
them. 

The program consisted of four one- 
act plays, staged under the direction 
of Talma-Zetta Wilbur. Special men- 
tion must be made of the work done 
by Saralee Walker Mercereau. Ger- 
trude Neilon, A Stone Waldo, Russell 
Calhoun and Alice H. Yost. In 
"Cash— $2000". Cyrus S. Kaufman. 
Eunice Elaine Woolsey, Helen Z. 
Krogstad ami J. Clarence Meyers. In 
"A Good Woman". Eileen Don- 
Ian did some good work, assisted by 
Gerald O'Mara, Leslie E. Fenster and 
Edward P. Flaherty. In the fourth 
play, "Crabbed Youth and Age", the 
cast was Phyllis Benjamin, Thelma 
Hudson. Rachel Van Yalen, Marion E. 
Garthorne, William Palmer, James 
Minenna. Everett O. Hockner. 



New Columbia Theatre 

Roland Hayes. Sunday Afternoon. Mnrcfe 
IriM p. in. 



Scottish Rite Hall 

Pnnl Whlteinnn, Sunday Afternoon mid Bvc 
nlnjr, March 1. 



Curran Theater 

San Francisco Symphony, Snndny Afternoon, 
March 1, 2i45 p. in. Friday Afternoon, 
March S, 3:011 p. in. 



Warfield 

George Fitzmaurice's production. "A 
Thief in Paradise" featuring Aileen 
Pringle, will be the screen feature at 
the Warfield the coming week. Ac- 
cording to the reviewers, this picture 
has everything the public want in a 
play. There is a fight undersea with 
sharks ; a polo game between blonde 
and brunette maids clad only in one- 
piece bathing suits ; an airplane honey- 
moon, and an undersea dance staged -t 
San Francisco by our own Fanchon. 
Fanchon and Marco will present 
"Ideas of Fashion", — this will be of 
special interest to the women of San 
Francisco, as all the latest Spring 
fashions will be shown. 



At the Picture Houses 

At the California beginning today is 
the first big starring production Nazi- 
mova has made for several seasons, — 
"The Redeeming Sin", a dramatic tale 
of the Paris underworld. She will be 
supported by Lou Tellegen, as Lupin, 
king of the French apaches. 

At the Granada will be seen "Com- 
ing Through", starring Lila Lee and 
Thomas Meighan. Paul Ash and his 
famous orchestra are offering a splen- 
did program. 

(Continued on Page IS) 



^you pay no more^ 



flESTFLOWEIg 




TMbtas o/« ThmiMnd ChnW 

224-226 Giant Aw. MKaMT/4975 




HARRY DIXON 

INTERPRETS 

YOUR IDEAS 

IN METAL 

241 GRANT AVE. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 28, 1925 





ocier 





By Antoinette Arnold 



The Loveliest Lady in the Room 

t'T T7"HO is the loveliest lady in the room?" asked an impetu- 

VV ous friend, addressing a famous visitor who attended 
a magnificent affair given, very recently, in the gold ballroom 
of the Fairmont Hotel. 

The noted man, (traveling incognito for reasons of his own), 
looked, quizzically, at the speaker. Then he leaned his chin on 
the back of his hand, after the manner of the Rodin statue, 
"The Thinker," and sagely replied : 

"I could pick her with my eyes shut." 

The inquisitor was nettled. He did not like the trite 
reply. So he answered, impatiently: "1 mean what I say. 
You, an artist of national renown, have been asked the 
question in due respect of your professional opinion, and." 
he added, convincingly, "in true deference to the ladies." 

"Ah." returned the man whose brush had pictured lovely 
women on canvas and in book-lore, "I, too, mean what 
I have said. Close your eyes as I do. and you shall see just 
what I mean." 

We all three closed our eyes. It was like playing at a 
game of blind-man's buff; only our friend, the artist, was 
serious. 

"Listen," commanded the visitor, "hear the voices and 
I will point out to you, without fail, the loveliest lady in 
this alluring room. It is she with the loveliest voice." 

Our eyes were closed. Our ears were attuned t<> beauty. 
And, oh. the sounds we heard ! About us seemed to be a 
bevy of giggling girls, with the same rise and fall to life- 
less laughter. Sounds, something like laughter, hut lack- 
ing the tone of mirth. All, all alike! 

I was tempted to open one eye. I did. 

In the direction from whence came the laughs, or sup- 
pressed giggles, were pretty girls, smiling aimlessly; abso- 
lutely without a trace of real joy, or the exuberance of 
youth which was their heritage. 

Then, the artist reached fur my hand. "Listen." he .-aid. 
Across the room came the soft modulation of a woman's 
voice, musical, full of reverberating merriment, abundantly 
joyful; a laugh that charmed and influenced one. With the 
laughter were softened tones of speech, perfectly synchro- 
nized and colorful. 

"There is the loveliest lady in the room." declared the 
distinguished visitor, the artist of well known fame, the 
man who, we had supposed, found beauty of face and con- 
tour of body the theme of his masterpieces. Here he was 
selecting the loveliest lady in a gorgeous ballroom by the 
modulations of her voice. 

We were amazed. Then we were curious. Eagerly our 
eyes sought, with tense vision, the one our ears had selected 
in its discriminating work, — the loveliest one in the room." 

There she stood conversing with her partner, a man high 
in diplomatic circles, one of the best known financiers of the 
West. And oh, what do you think"? Her hair was snow 
white. 

The most beautiful woman in the ballroom, according 
to our artist friend; and, now according to our own critical 
vision, (led by an attuned sense of hearing), was not a 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

«.'0 Hush street. Between Powell and Stockton, Snn Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN. Proprietor 



dashing girl, in her early twenties; not a debutante; not a 
sweet young woman in the flush of her claim on youth. She 
was a woman whose hair was as white as the Sierra snows. 

Her face was radiant. Her eyes sparkled with the joy 
of living and of understanding. Unselfish manner of thought, 
character and beauty of soul, shone from a countenance of 
faultless outline, a woman nearing that ill-quoted span of years 
— middle age. 

Yet there she stood, gowned in white from head to 
heels, a picture of confidential loveliness. Her poise, per- 
fect and natural ; her well-shaped head, her gleaming shoul- 
ders, and that innate "thorough-bred" bearing pronounced 
her, undeniably, as the "loveliest lady in the room." 

ller charm of manner drew us, too, as it did young men 
and young women and those of her own age, who flocked 
about her. We gazed with tense admiration. One couldn't 
help it! Her refinement, her well groomed appearance, her 
simple elegance, and above all the subtle fascination of her 
soft, well modulated voice, made us all agree that the 
artist's decision was correct and conclusive. 

She was the loveliest one in the room. 
* * * 

Society and the Automobile Show 

Society, en masse, graced the opening day-, .if the Ninth 
Annual Pacific Automobile Show, attending the beautiful 
event in the latest dictates of fashion. 

Dealers long ago recognized the importance of the fem- 
inine patronage, and, recognized too, the necessity of cater- 
ing to mi-lady's tastes in the automobile trade. In fact. 
we are told, upon the great authority, that feminine in- 
fluence has made its way into practically every avenue of 
the finished product. 

While the feminine purchaser may not know all about the 
mechanism of the machine she drives, (although most ol 
them do know it very, very well), she certainly does know 
what kind of a machine she wants and why she wants it. 
Usually, she has positive opinions. 

As beauty of appearance is part and parcel of the auto- 
mobile, so is beauty of appearance exemplified by the rep- 
resentative gatherings of society at the Automobile Show. 

Saturday, the final night of the most successful show 
of California's motor displays, will draw a large contin- 
gency from the exclusive sets of Burlingame, San Fran- 
cisco, Piedmont and adjacent social centers. It promises 
to be an augumented Fashion Show. Beauty of garment 
and attire, and forerunners of Spring styles will compete 
for favor with high-powered cars, which will undoubtedly, 
find ownership among those attending the Ninth Annual 
Pacific Automobile Show. 

"The Automobile Show is a marvel." That is the ver- 
dict of society. They attest their stamp of high commen- 
dation by ordering their monograms on a number of the 
finest cars exhibited. 

That after all — is the language of the elite. It is the 
language which dealers prize and which makes them proud. 
as they have every reason to be, of this year's magnificent 
Avuti 'mobile Show. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter 8130 Under Management CARL S. STANLEY J 
i. ---.-.-.- .»+ 



February 28, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Handsome Yacht Launched 

A trial trip of one of the handsomest yachts 
mi the Pacific Coast was made on February 
19, when the Willis Walker yacht. "Imperial," 
left its moorings at the Crowley shipyards in 
( lakland and spent the day cruising about the 
waters of San Francisco Bay. 

Leon Brooks Walker, in charge of the yacht, 
took a few of his close friends on the trial 
trip. According to authorities the yacht is a 
wonderful piece of ship building. It is 135 
Eeet long with wide decks covered with awn- 
ing. The cabins and saloons are finished with 
inlaid mahogany and walnut. Beautiful up- 
holstery is used on the furniture. Each of the 
four cabins has a bath room. 

The owner plans to give a number of parties 
on board his yacht according to enthusiastic 
and appreciative friends, who declare that the 
"Imperial" is a thing of beauty and one which 
commands the pride of every one familiar with 
ships and especially, with the structure of a 
yacht. 

Bon Voyage Tea 

Miss Nancy Buckley, poet and short story writer, who is 
leaving early in March for a trip abroad, was the guest ol 
honor at a literary tea given by the Pen Women of San 
Francisco last Saturday afternoon in the Laurel Court of 
the Fairmont Hotel. Two of Miss Buckley's poems, set 
to music by Rudy Seiger, were played during the tea by 
the composer and leader of the Fairmont orchestra. The 
songs were "I'm Wishing For You" and "Because I Loved 
You So." Miss Mary Buckley, Nancy's sister, will accom- 
pany her to Europe, where the young poet will devote much 
time to writing articles for publication during her sojourn 
in large cities of Europe. Miss Buckley will visit the con- 
vents of Europe and be among those who make the sacred 
pilgrimage to Rome. 

She is the author of "Laughter and Longings" and "The 

Wings of Youth.'' 

* * * 

Presidio Ball 

Fort Winfield Scott gave a brilliant ball last Friday even- 
ing in honor of General and Mrs, Charles T. Menoher, 
officers of the coast defenses being the hosts. There were 
four hundred guests in attendance. 

Assisting in receiving were General and Mrs. Henry D. 

To. 1. 1 Jr., Colonel and Mrs. Percy Bishop, Lieutenant and 
Mrs. Darrow Menoher, and Lieutenant Herbert Anderson, 
who made the introductions. The Assembly Hall, where 

the ball was given, was beautifully decorated to resemble 

an elaborate pagoda. Lights were made to show through 
miniature pagodas, while boughs of deep pink and the 
lighter hues were banked in abundant profusion, producing 
an exotic effect. 

Armv and navy society was represented at the ball, at- 
tended by main of the resident service people, with a 
representative contingency from the different posts. 

* * * 

Colonel and Mis. William R. Tobin, Colonel and Mrs. 
Gouverneur Lacker. Colonel and Mrs. Roger Fitch at- 
tended the army ball. Colonel and Mrs. Samuel Jones 
entertained General and Mrs. Menoher at dinner in the 
Presidio preceding the event. 





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HOTEL CANTERUURV 
-no Sutter Street 

•San Francisco's Finest 

Family Hotel 

250 Rooms 

Kates: From $2.50 per day 



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West Indies 

ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET COMPANY 

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Mr. and Mrs. George W. McNcar and Mr. 
( ieorge W. McNear Jr., gave a dinner dance at 
their home Wednesday night to sixty of their 

friends, Among the guests were: Mr. and 
Mrs. George Nickel, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin 
Eddy, Mr. and Mrs. John Bryant Knox, Mr. 
and Mrs. Hugh Porter, Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Bowles. Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Havel Alvord, 
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Whittel, Mrs. Harry Hill. 
Mrs. Marie Russell Fagan, Miss Evelyn Mc- 
Laughlin, Miss Marie Louise Potter, Miss 
Josephine Grant. Miss Marianne Ktihn, Miss 
Katherine Kuhn, Miss Claire Knight, Mr. Rob- 
ert Hooker Jr., Mr. Tallent Ransome, Mr. 
Frederick Johnson, Mr. George Montgomery, 
Mr. Leon Brooks Walker and Mr. Brooks Wal- 
ker. * * * 

Mrs. Robert Oxnard gave a farewell tea at 
her home preceding her departure for New- 
York, where she joins Mr. Oxnard. After 
visiting relatives, they sail for the West In- 
dies. On their return to New York they will 
be joined by Mrs. Stetson Winslow, who will 
accompany them to Europe. 
Junior Assembly * * * 

The Junior Assembly gave an attractive dance last Fri- 
day night in the auditorium of the Century Club, decorated 
to resemble a carnival. 

Many delightful dinners preceded the event, hostesses 
having for their guests members of their set,- while the 
sorority and fraternity members vied with one another for 
friendly favors. Miss Betty Ebright, Miss Carol Lapham. 
Messrs. William Taylor, Jerry Bates and John Stein were 
entertained by Miss Evelyn Taylor at a most interesting 
affair. 

Miss Elizabeth Raymond, who makes her home with her 
aunt, Mrs. Charles Felton, entertained a group of friends, 
afterwards going to the Junior Assembly. Misses Heath 
I lamilton, Edith Chamberlain, Kathleen Pringle, Daisy Bell 
( herton, Messrs. Leslie Black, Sherman Cornwall, Maxwell 
McNutl Jr., Yoorhies Clark, Breck Moran and Thomas 
Magee III, were her guests. 

* * * 

Mrs. D. M. Linnard of Pasadena, accompanied by Mrs. 
Ezra H. Connell and Miss Elizabeth Connell of Scranton, 
Pa., who passed a few days at the Fairmont, left Wednes- 
day on the S. S. Matsonia for Honolulu. 

* * * 

Mrs. Florence Porter Pfingst gave a charming dinner 
at the Fairmont Hotel last Wednesday night, having as 
her guests many prominent society people from the set 
with which Mrs. Pfingst has been associated. Always gra- 
cious and interesting, the brilliant hostess has a way of mak- 
ing her guests a component part of her beautiful surround- 
ings. She is very artistic for one thing, and values the blend- 
ing i if proper colors. 

Small tables were spread for guests in the gray room 
of the Fairmont Hotel with the diversions of bridge, mah 
jongg and other selected game.-. 



{ Social and Business Engraving \ 



Personal Service Given - Orders Called For 
at your Home or Office. 



1 



INGRIM-RUTLEDGE COMPANY 

STATIONERS - ENGRAVERS 
TELEPHONE 419-423 Montgomery Street 

Sutter 6874 N " r California 

Memorial Engrossing a specially 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 28, 1925 




By Hoot McGregor 



George Ritchie, brother to James A. Babe Ritchie, the 
two acknowledged champion amateur brother golfers of 
America, added another championship to his long list of vic- 
tories when he won the Northern California Amateur Mu- 
nicipal golf championship, at Lincoln Park on his twenty- 
third birthday. 

Ritchie defeated Gerald Hardy by exhibiting a brand of 
golf that would be hard to duplicate, by either our best 
amateur or professional. 

Some of his shots were phenomenal so it was no wonder 
that he won the verdict of 9 up and 7 to play, over a sched- 
uled 36 hole match. 

George Ritchie had previously won the medal round, set- 
ting a record for the municipal course at 0.?, four strokes 
better than his opponent. 

This was accomplished against a held of 656 entries, the 
largest gathering of golfers in any championship tourna- 
ment in the world. 

Ritchie's play throughout the whole seven days was par 
excellence; the further he went the better he played. 

To prove what superior golf he played, none of his oppo- 
nents reached the fifteenth hole and the final match he put 
forth his best effort, by clearing up this record-breaking 
field at the twenty-ninth hole, a truly remarkable finish to 
one of the most successful tournaments ever held in San 
Francisco. 

The remarkable golf exhibited during the seven day-, of 
play can be attributed to the wonderful condition of the 
course, for at no time has the Municipal links been in better 
shape than it is right now. thanks to Superintendent John 
McLaren, and the Board of Park Commissioners. 

The patrons who play at Lincoln Park can thank these 
gentlemen for the interest they have taken in giving the 
public a splendid course to play on. and while many of our 
local links are closed, the Bulletin pulled off the world's 
greatest golfing event. 

The Northern California Amateur Municipal golf cham- 
pionship tournament, which drew a world's record entry of 
656 players, was made up of the most influential business 
and professional men. 

The Olympic Club was the largest contributor, when one 
hundred and fifty golfers from Lakeside signed up. The 
most remarkable thing about these Olympians was the fact 
that six of them qualified for the championship flight : 
George Ritchie, Ward Dwight, Jr., Eaton McMillan. E. G. 
"Togo" Osborne. George Erlin and Howard Rieder, and 
only three managed to qualify for the lower flights, namely: 
George McDaniels, Jr.. W. B. Kendall and Phil Clapp. 

Six of the Lakesiders won two rounds in the championship 
flights and there were still three left to fight it out in the 
semi-final round: George Ritchie. George Mullen and Ward 
Dwight; while Gerald Hardy, of the California Club, \\a- 
the other contestant. 

The medical men of our city turned out fifty strong, but 
they found the company too fast, as Dr. Wilhelm Waldeyer, 
of the Mount Zion Hospital, was the only one to qualify. 
Dr. Waldeyer won two good matches, but was eliminated in 
the semi-final round. 

There was quite an array of baseball talent, many from 
the Eastern clubs, who winter in California each year, and 
several from the Seals roster. 



Bert Ellison, manager of the Seals, made quite a name for 
himself when he won his first match after sinking an ap- 
proach shot on the nineteenth hole; but unfortunately he 
had to default because his team had to go to training camp. 
However, Barney Kerns, formerly of Salt Lake ball team, 
upheld the reputation of his profession, by winning a flight 
from Harry Joyce, the runner-up in the medal round la-t 
year. Barney played very consistent golf throughout and 
thoroughly deserved to win. 

Charlie McLaughlin, one of the leading barrister golfers 
oi our city, ha- shown wonderful improvement of late. His 
-bowing all through this tournament has been very marked; 
his wins all being clean cut. Never once was he extended. 

V. Hawkins, who won the third flight, had lots of close 
call-, but he stuck to his guns, eventually winning his final 
match on the home green. Fred Berne, who won from Mil- 
ton Curry, one of the old school at Lincoln Park, deserves 
a lot of credit. It is rumored around the Park that Berne is 
a real comer, so Milton has no kick coining. 

The tournament throughout was a wonderful success: 
the standard of golf has never been equalled in any previous 
championship tournaments in California. The Emporium 
management was very pleased of having the privilege of do- 
nating the trophies for the winners and runner-ups of each 
flight, and two extra prizes for George Ritchie, the medalist, 
and Eddie Reddell the second medalist. Everybody, includ- 
ing the patrons of Lincoln, forfeited their chance to play to 
help make thi- tournament a success. The players were dis- 
patched by Paul, the starter, promptly on time, without a 
kick being registered. The committee who handled the af- 
fair deserves a lot of credit — J. R. Pauson, Sam L. Conlan. 
Jr.. Dr. Floyd Russell certainly put the thing over in good 
shape. 



San Francisco's Civic Auditorium will be transformed 
into a huge amphitheater during the presentation of the 
great " Pageant of Youth," musical masque, to be staged 
with 1.IKHI players April 1 to 5. inclusive. Five evening 
performances will be given, with matinees Saturday and 
Sunday. 

To provide the comfortable arrangement of a theater 
and retain the large proportions of the Auditorium, seats 
will be raised and built on a semi-circular plan. Drapes 
suspended from the balconies will eliminate from view the 
unused portion of the main floor, giving the effect of a 
theater within a theater. No -eats will be included except 
those permitting unobstructed view of the stage. A pro- 
scenium arch seventy feet wide will give an opening of 
sufficient size to frame the many stage pictures which will 
develop during the action. The masque has three acts and 
eight scenes, employing spectacular effects and using many 
large groups of dancers in addition to the twenty-five 
-peaking parts. 

The vivacity of youth, colorful costuming and a magnifi- 
cent musical score played bv a symphony orchestra of fifty, 
under the direction of Achille Artigues. will be features of 
the "Pageant of Youth." It is presented for the benefit of 
St. Ignatius College. Rev. R. A. Gleeson, S. J., is general 
director. 

The pageant, with its dramatic theme of Youth's triumph 
over Evil, is allegorical. Its chief character is a young man 
of the college campus, guarded by the spirit of education, 



February 28. l'»J5 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 




By Edwin F. Marriott 



Boxing. When Joe Benjamin, the fighting Sheik, made 
his sensational win over Jack Silver, the San Francisco 
Lightweight, Monday at Recreation Park, San Franciscans 
saw one of the most sensational lights in history. Benja- 
min had Silver on the verge of a knock-out three different 
times. There was a record crowd for California witnessing 
the fight; sixteen thousand folks passed through the turn- 
stiles, according to the promoters. Five thousand dollars 
of this goes to Benjamin, three thousand to Silver, and 
eight thousand for the Seals who own the park. 

According to Capt. Strelinger, chairman of the State 
Athletic Commission, there will be no more bouts in this 
state in which champions will appear, unless they are risk- 
ing their titles. He says, "I do not think these champions 
should receive large purses and not be forced to defend 
their titles." * * * 

Polo. The University of Stanford's quartet of polo 
players were outridden and outplayed in Tucson, Arizona, 
last week in their match with the cavalry officers' polo 
game. The Westerners played hard, but were not skilled 
enough to go against men who had been playing the game 
for years. 

San Mateo opened its invitational polo season at Del 
Monte today by defeating Harry Hunt's squad, nine to 
four. On a field that was treacherous and slick, the game 
presented many thrills, and was featured by the hard riding 
of the experts from the Hawaiian Islands, Baldwin Dilling- 
ham; and F. K. Castle. 

For San Mateo, Willie Crocker and Dick Schwerin did 
the best part of the scoring, though Willie Tevis showed a 
speedy, clever game. 

On March 1st to 20th the sixteenth annual polo tourna- 
ment under the auspices of the U. S. Polo Association, 
opened in Coronado, California. The hotel will be packed 
to capacity as usual, and the guests will have an additional 
attraction' at the Country Club to the already numerous 
pleasure routes furnished by the hotel. Amongst the events 
will be the Joseph fessop challenge, the Pacific Coast junior 
championship, the Pacific circuit cup handicap, and the 
Pacific Coast ail-American open championship. 

* * * 

Bicycling. Pete Moeskops, the world's champion bi- 
cycler, and Alois de Craves, the two Belgians, will start in 
the big six-day bicycle race next week in Xew York City. 
Reggie McNamara. and Harry Horan, will represent 
America in this terrific grind. Many of the old time San 
Franciscans are interested in this event because of the fact 
that in the old days they used to spend their Sundays rid- 
ing in the hills adjacent' to San Francisco and Burlingame, 
as well as in Marin County. That used to lie their princi- 
pal source of pleasure. And then came the entrance of San 
Francisco into the six-day racing game, which was the most 
popular sport for some years. The automobile an.! 

plane have taken its place. 

* * * 

Trapshooting. The San Francisco (Inn Club held its 
meet the other day at the Fort Scott Grounds and fifty-four 
shooters attended. The scores were exceptionally high for 
this time of the year. George Waldie led the trapsh 
in the manipulation of his targets. 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 
208 Crocker Building (Opposite Palace Hotel) San Francisco 
Phone Kearny 391 



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Por :tO yeitrN the nioptt popular Eye Tonle 
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l»y mail 70c. 

George Mayerle, Expert Optician, 960 Market Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 




DR. B. W. HAINES 

DENTIST 
Elkan Gunst Building 

323 Geary at Powell Hours 9 U 4 

San Francisco Telephone Douglas 2949 



St. Mary's Academy 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 



For particulars address 
SISTER SUPERIOR 



Select Boarding and Day School tinder the 
Direction of the Sisters of St. Dominic 



Established 28 Years 

EXTRA HAIR 
COVER THE BOB F0R 
EVENING WEAR 

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12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 28, 1925 



Bits of Unwritten History 



By Edward S. Spring 



CHAPTER XXV 
Playing Cards In Nevada 

Ai K )( )D game of cards has ever been a source of re- 
laxation for the tired mining man. It was especially 
so in the earlv davs on the Comstock, and in the other great 
camps of Nevada'. During a recent visit to Virginia City, 
I noticed that the custom still prevails, but on a much 
smaller scale. In the old days, when two, or more. Nevad- 
ans were assembled, "off shift," or to speak more under- 
standingly, "out of business hours," a pack of cards was 
sure to be produced, and a game of uncertain duration was 
started. I am not exaggerating, when I declare, that the 
old time Comstockers would rather play cards, that eat. 
for while enjoying the freedom of the famous Washoe 
Club, of Virginia City, I have seen a card game, in the club 
rooms, that lasted two days and nights and the only refresh- 
ment the players had, was an occasional sandwich and a 
drink. Among the players, in this game, was a judge of 
the district court of Storey County, three magnates who con- 
trolled leading mines, a United States senator, an agent of 
a big express company, an agent of the, then, largest bank 
in California, a noted lawyer and four or five executives of 
prominent mining companies of the Comstock. A dozen 
well known mining and business men watched the game, 
several of whom were eager to "sit in," should any of the 
players "drop out." The game was draw poker. The "ante" 
was 50 cents. The "limit" of the bets was $100. 

The game started at 8 o"clock in the evening. At 1 1 :30 p. m.. 
one of the players, a foreman of a group of mines, arose, and 
asked one of the lookers-on to take his place for a few hours, 
as he had to go underground and inspect the work. His pile 
of "chips" was at once taken over by the new player and the 
game proceeded without further interruption. 

Turning to me, the foreman said : "Come along with me 
and see what we are doing on the lower levels. The game will 
be going on when we return." We reached the main shaft 
of the group in time to see the "graveyard." (midnight), shift 
of miners go on duty, and we spent the next four hours in 
the drifts, crosscuts, stopes and other openings, where im- 
portant work was being done. At 5 a. m. we were back at the 
Washoe Club, where the poker game was "warming up," as 
the foreman said. Only two changes were noted among 
ihe players. Some of the piles of chips had passed into new 
possession. Several of the by-standers had gone. The fore- 
man resumed his chair. During his absence, his friend had won 
a little money. I saw that the game was in good, healthy 
shape and could last quite a time, without my presence. -■> 1 
went to my room in the neighborhood and had a 10-hours' 
sleep. At 6 o'clock on 'he following evening, I made another 
visit to the Washoe Club and found the poker game in ex- 
cellent shape. Two of the players, who dropped out, on the 
previous night, had returne 1 and there were one or two new 
faces in the ring around the table. Most of the chips were in 
front of the district judge who evidently had been going 
strong. 1 went away and had dinner. 

(Continued on Page 16) 



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quality — 

A PURE PENNSYLVANIA PRODUCT 

VALVOLINE OIL COMPANY 

462 Bryant St., San Francisco 122 Center St., Los Angeles 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that a vigorous brushing once or twice a day In 
taking very good care of them. Brushing In only n part of the 
process. Many things can happen to your teeth which only a 
competent dentist can take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as you Imagine. A toothache means 
trouble} do not watt for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth sore? Do your gums bleed f Call In today 
and talk It over. It will cost nothing. My nerve blocking sys- 
tem blocks off all nerves and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfield 335 

SPECIALISTS — Extraction*; Crowns; Self Cleaning Bridges; 

Porcelain Work and Roofless Plates 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED AND GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage of Automobiles 



SANITARY DRINKING WATER 

For Homes, Offices and Factories. Quality Guaranteed 

KEYSTONE WATER COMPANY 

130 Russ St. Phone Hemlock 170 San Francisco 



ARE YOUR BRAKES SAFE? 

H'e Specialize on Brakes Only— Flat Prices on All Cars 

S. F. BRAKE SERVICE 

ST. FRANCIS GARAGE, 1240 POST STREET 

(Bet. Van Ness Ave. and Franklin St.) 

Phone Prospect 1915 



TEL. FRANKLIN 3«S3 
Metal Work Apper- 
taining: to \ntomo- 
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Welding — Blncfe- 

smithlng. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 




Income Tax Service 



Advice Given and Returns Made at Your Home, 
by Appointment. 

J. Leo Park 

230 Russ Building — 235 Montgomery Street 
Phone Garfield 5364 



February 28, 1925 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller, 

Director of Publicity 

National Automobile Club 

Trip to Fresno District 

THE FRESNO district offers an 
educational trip to the motorists 
of the bay cities, according to the 
Touring Bureau of the National Auto- 
mobile Club. 

A visit to plant No. 4 of the Sun- 
Maid Raisin Growers of California is 
replete with interesting features as it 
is not only the largest raisin packing 
plant in the world, but the largest plant 
in which dried fruit is handled. 

The plant was erected several years 
ago at an approximate cost of $3,500,- 
000, and has all of the latest devices 
for seeding, stemming, packing, crat- 
ing and handling this principal dried 
fruit of the San Joaquin Valley. 

Visitors are always welcome at 
Plant No. 4 anytime between 8:00 
a.m. and noon and from 1:00 to 4:00 
p.m. Guides conduct the visitors to 
all departments of the immense plant, 
explaining in detail the necessary pro- 
cesses in handling the raisin from the 
"sweat box" to carton. 

In the near future, the visitors to 
plant No. 4 will also lie privileged to 
sec at least part of the new Sun-Maid 
syrup plant that is now in the course 
of construction and which, when com- 
pleted, will be of immense benefit in 
handling all sub-standard raisin-. 



Pacific Highway Construction Work 

The definite date for closing a por- 
tion of the road between Redding and 
Dunsmuir has been set for March 1. 
according to advices received from the 
California Highway Commission by 
the Touring Bureau of the National 
Automobile Club. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 

The portion to be placed under con- 
trol starts at a point 23 miles north 
of Redding, and extends 12 miles 
northward to a point at Vollmer's 
ranch opposite the town of Delta. 

Until May 15 the road will be closed 
from 6:30 p.m. of one day until 10:30 
a. m. of the following day, leaving 8 
daylight hours open for traffic. From 
May 15 to November 15 the road will 
be closed from 10 p. m. until 7 a. m., 
leaving it open 15 hours to handle the 
heavy summer traffic. 

Accommodations are very limited 
north of Redding to the work camps 
and south from Dunsmuir, therefore, 
it is advisable that all motorists ar- 
range their schedule so that their over- 
night stops will be at Redding or south 
thereof or at Dunsmuir or north of this 
point. 

* * * 

Trips to the Snow Country 

February is the most popular month 
in the year for excursions to the snow 
country, according to the Touring Bu- 
reau of the National Automobile Club 
and those desiring to drive to the 
snow-line over the week-end will en- 
counter their first snow at approxi- 
mately the sixteenth mile stone above 
Placerville. The slide which occurred 
on the Placerville road, during the 
heavy storm, about 20 miles beyond 
Placerville. has been removed and mo- 
torists may now drive beyond this 
point without difficulty. It is still in- 
advisable to attempt to drive beyond 
Colfax due to construction work. 

Motorists driving to the snow-line 
on the Placerville road are cautioned 
to take chains as the road is very 
muddy. 

* * * 

Sacramento Roads Back 
to Normal 

All roads in the vicinity of Sacra- 
mento, with the exception of the River 
Garden Highway, have fully recovered 
from the effects of the recent heavy 
storm, according to the Touring Bu- 
reau of the National Automobile Club. 
flu- bridge near Nicolaus on the River 
< iarden Highway is being replaced as 
rapidly as possible and it is anticipated 
that this will be completed by March 
3. In the meantime, traffic is being 
diverted over other roads. Both the 
east and the west sides of the Sacra- 
mento Valley are hack to normalcy. 
The Pacific Highway, which was 
closed by snow in the vicinity of Weed, 
is again open and motorists enroute to 
Northern California. Oregon and 
Washington, are proceeding without 
delay or difficulty. 

* * * 

It has been estimated that sparrows 
save the farmers in the United States 
00.000 every year by destroying 
weed seed. 



13 



Phone Sutteh 3278 

Wm. Herbst & Company 

[Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

Clockmakeri and Watchmakers 

CHIME. ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

20I> Post Street nt Gran. \veiim- 

San Frnm*lHCo» Calif. 

Call and DalivtT in San Frnncisco, Alameda 
and San Mateo Countiet 



ice; (Palo Alto Off 

875 FOLSOM ST. 818 EMERSON ST. 

""^ne : Phone -. 

644-645 Palo Alto 315-J 



PIONEER -GIBSON EXPRESS 

' FAST EXPRESS AND 

FREIGHT'SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way 

Points Twice Daily 



CYCOt 

MOTOR. OIL 




MOTOR OIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced) under 
thenewHEXEON 
process. . 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Ul. 



tocfl car q/>erated\^ 
by reliable 
cnauffeurs 
</to moroucflty under- 
stand their Jbus/ness 



This means that you 
can dispense with all 
worries as to personal 
security when using 
our cars. Our drivers 
are careful and they 
never violate your de- 
sires for safety. 




Phone Grayitone 270 

MM Pine Street 

San Francutco 



SOTJJH^ 



14 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 28, 1925 



HOLLYWOOD GOSSIP 
By Madeline Jamison 

MARRIAGE as an institution has been made the theme of 
three-fourths of our popular fiction; it has been the main 
motif of half the articles in the magazines; it has been dis- 
cussed by our educators and lecturers; so we are not surprised 
that it should provide the motion picture producers with an end- 
less variety of material. We yawned through "Mad Mar- 
riage," and dozed through "Married Flirts," but "Cheaper 
to Marry" put us frankly to sleep. A story with a palpable 
moral went out of fashion long ago with the vogue for 
stories where the villain was punished and the good man 
or woman became rich or famous or achieved their heart's 
desire. .For the truth of the matter is that it doesn't work- 
out that way in real life, and today we demand what my old 
black mammy used to call "a tolerably true story." The 
chief reason we are bored by a story with a moral is that 
this is an age of individual thought and action, with the 
resultant rebellion against the teachings of older and wiser 
heads. We do not want to be led. but want to find our way 
by ourselves; to correct our own mistakes and work out our 
own salvation, and perhaps it is better that we should. Who 
knows? 

Speaking of marriages, Hollywood is whispering and 
snickering behind its hand at the rumor that Rudolph Val- 
entino is badly hen-pecked, and that he doesn't dare make 
a move, publicly or privately, without "wifey's" consent. 
The incongruous picture of the famous sheik toeing the 
mark, affects our risibility. His recent break with June 
Mathias, who has written most of his plays and who claims 
to have "discovered" him, adds color to the story. Rudolph 
is making a new picture called "The Cobra" which we hope 
will take the bad taste from our mouths that the "Sainted 
Devil" left there. As a successor to the magnificent and 
beautiful "Monsieur Beaucaire," the "Sainted Devil" was 
very nearly awful. 

Be Photographed This Year on Your Birthday 



WHERE TO DINE 







STUDIOS IN \l.l. 

llliSCIPAl, CITIRS OF 

CALIFORNIA 



Oaklnnd 

408 14<h Slroel 

Sim FrnnclNco 

41 Grant Avenue 



CAFE MARQUARD 



i 




Adjoining Wilkes and Curran 

Theaters, Geary and Mason. 

Phone Prospect 61 

1925 REVUE 

Sparkling Entertainment 
DINING— DANCING 

After-Theater Suppers 
Superb Service 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. , 

GUS' FASHION 

j THIi MOST POPULAR RESTAURANT IN SAN FRANCISCO I 

«5 Pont Street. Ncnr Market Street 

) Phone Kearny 4536 1 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners, $1.26. Meals Served a la Carte. { 
Also Regular French and Italian Dinners. 
I l ish and Game n Specialty 



BLANCO'S 



l 



Louis Cerles. Jean Barrere. John Piegth. Props. 



L 



o'Kurrcll nnd I.nrkin Streets I'lione Frnnklln 

No visitor should leave the city without dining 

in the finest cafe in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) ----- 75 c 

Dinner, Meek Dny» ------- »1.K0 

Dinner, Sundnys and Holiday* ----- 91.75 



The only real artistic place in the Latin Quarter. Bohemian 

dinner. 75c — served every evening. Saturday, Sunday and 

Holidays, $1.25. Dancing from 7 to 1 every evening. 

BEGIN'S BOLOGNA RESTAURANT 

240 Columbus Avenue Phone Sutter 8825 



NEW SHARON GRILL 

Formerly Bergez-Frank's Old Poodle Dog. Bush Street 

35 NEW MONTGOMERY STREET 

Opposite Palace Hotel Phone Softer 8008 



Colors of 
Initials 

Cold 
Blark 
Green 
Lavender 
Red 
Silver 
Blue, 
Yellow 
While 
Gun Metal Black 

$5.00 

for 100 Packs 




dolor of 

Match Parks 

i. iid 
Blark 

Green 

Yellow 

Silver 

Orange 

I. ic.hr Blue 

Purple 

Lavender 

$3.50 

for 50 Parks 



$2.00 V/ for 12 Packs 

MONOGRAM MATCH PACKS 

(TRADE MARK) 
Wilh Your Own Initials— In a Neat Box. Ideal for tl..- dinnor, Mali Jongg or Bridge 
Table. The smartest smoking accessory. A charming gift. In Ovjl. Diamond Shape, 
or Blork Type. Be Mir.- la iUIc color of pack, color of iniii;.l nnd itylc ol type 

desired. Mail your order and check al once to 

MONOGRAM MATCH COMPANY 
1402 De Young Building San Francisco, Calif. 

Or or lour Dealer,- S. 8 C Gump Co.. Sun Franci.ro; Cilv of Par,.. San I'r ....- 

Cisco: Rons Bros., San Francisco; Paul Elder Co.. San Franri-cn; Iain Hotel 

San Francisco; Howell Dohrmann Co., Oakland; J. W. Robinson Co 1.,,. njieclee' 
Mis? Cuyelle, Honolulu. T. H.; Meier and Frank Co.. Portland Ore 



Women's Building Sandwich Shop 

212 Ellis 

Breakfasts 35c-50c Lunch 50c Table d'hote Dinner 60c i 

A la carte orders at all times 







M-XKY IlERETH CAROLINE JONES 

Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 2:30 
and tea from 3 to 5 



334 Sutti;r St. 



Douglas 7118 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

OS Third Avenue. SAN HATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 

Open From 

1 1 :80 a. m. to 2:00 p. m. 

5:30 p. m. to 8:30 p. m. 

Sundays and Holidays 

4:30 to 8:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 
Ilnlf Block from Ilinhwny 



"ebruan 28, 192 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



IS 




FINANCE 



DOLLARS 

and - — = 



SENSE 




INSURANCE 



Dollars and Sense 

THE sudden tendency downward in industrial stocks 
has not been quite stopped and there is much specula- 
tion as to the reason. There does not appear to be an) 
grounds upon which so sharp a decline, almost three points, 
can be logically predicated. The upward tendency since 
has made up some of the ground but. not all, and the un- 
certainty which caused a flurry of the dimensions referred 
to is not altogether a good omen. But, on the whole, there is 
no cause to take a pessimistic attitude. 

— There is no doubt at all about the condition of the mar- 
kets and the fact that stocks are in such good condition is 
proof of the public optimism. We all know the actual effect 
of such optimism on business as a whole and the "intangi- 
bles" are all in favor of a banner year. There is no doubt, 
however, that the objective business showing, apart from 
the speculative, will bear quite a deal of improvement. 
March should tell a tale in that respect. 

* * * 

— Henry M. Robinson, president of the First National 
Bank of Los Angeles, and director of the Los Angeles 
branch of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, who 
was a member of the Dawes Commission at the recent con- 
ference of the Federal Reserve, says : "Today the most pow- 
erful interest of the world, as far as the control of gold and 
of credit is concerned, is the federal reserve system of the 
United States." And with regard to the operations of the 
Federal Reserve system he deprecated sentimentality, but 
urged that "the federal reserve system must so handle its 
international credit relation that it will benefit the distressed 
nations only that such benelit may in turn accrue to our ad- 
vantage." That is a very commonsense view and if carried 
out, should produce results. 

— Stockholders of the Mission Sa\iiiL;> Bank have held 
their annual meeting and have added Gustave Lachman to 
the board of directors. The present directors are Mayor 
Rolph, [ohn II. Graves, E. W. Hopkins, Geo. A. Pope, 
Stuart F. Smith. Matt 1. Sullivan and l)e Witt C. Treat. 
Mayor Rolph has been head of the bank since its establish 
merit, 19 years ago. Last sear the bank gained about $650,- 
000 in deposits, which stood at 8,350,000 a( the end of the 

\ ear. 

* * * 

— There are rumors of an increase in the dividend rate 
and a split up of the stock of the California Packing Cor- 
poration. The shares of the company have been selling 
a new high record mark. It is at present about the strong 
stock on the San Francisco market. 

* * * 

— There arc mining developments of note and there ap- 
pears to be a tendency towards a progress of the mining in- 
dustry. New finds have been made and ores shipped from 
the Bishop district. Developments of importance are ex- 
pected at an earl) date at Blind Springs Hill of the Coman- 
che Mines Company. The company, winch is controlled b\ 
Palmer Bros, of Los Vngeles, is running a long tunnel to 
intersect at a rich silver-lead-gold vein, which has. it is said. 
Melded more than $20,000,000 in the past. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

(LATELY THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY) 
SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th. 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banksin California, 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

by mergers orconsolldatlon 8 with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savlnjls Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1924 

Assets $96,917,170.69 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,000,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 461,746.52 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Porta 1 Ave, and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (4J4) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 
Tnlil Up Capital $20,000,001) $20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued, CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATIOS. OVER COO BRANCHES 
THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 
PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

San Francisco Office: 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
IlltUCE IIEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHAHD 

Manager Asst. Manager 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 
Walter W. Derr, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. 






MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douglas 2J44 



SUN LIFE 

ASSURANCE COMPANY 

of CANADA 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 



San Francisco, Calif. 



MUNICIPAL AND PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacture™ of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, (1 l.VEIITS. FLUMES, 

PENSTOCKS, GASHOLDERS, SMOKJS STACKS, ETC. 

San Francisco, Calif. !•"« Angeles. Cnllf. 

I I 1 llnrket SI. T,717 Santa Fc Avenue 



We specialize in annuities. 

interested in an income for 

life and should have full information. 

Your life insurance Deeds also taken 

rare of. 

The prosperity of tile Company is 
emphasized by the fact that 6.389! interest was earned during 
1924 on their Invested rands. 

Assets Over $270,000,000 

All life polities participate in dividends. Over 133,000,000 in- 
vested in t'nited States securities. $1,500,000 of which is in 
California. Phone or write 

P. M. JOST 

701 Alaska Commercial Bldg. San Francisco. California 

Phone Garfield 6540 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 28, 1925 



BITS OF UNWRITTEN HISTORY 

(Continued from Page 12) 

There was a good show at Piper's Opera House. John Mc- 
Cullough and the California Theater Company were playing 
Macbeth. I attended, and, after the performance, went again 
to the Washoe Club. The poker game was going on at a lively 
clip and. this time, the express manager had most of the chips 
in his possession. There were few changes among the players. 
1 went away and put in another good sleep. I made several 
calls at the club rooms the next day and found practically the 
same players, still at it. Most of them drowsy-looking and other- 
wise in poor condition. The lawyer was said to have been a 
big winner. 

The ..game broke up at 2 p.m. on the second day. Several 
of the' party were going to San Francisco and wanted to 
bathe and "fix-up," in time to catch the afternoon train. 1 
went along with them and. as we boarded the train. I looked 
around and saw, in a vacant lot, near the depot, six or eight 
Piute bucks squatting around a brightly colored shawl that had 
been spread on the ground. They were playing draw poker a la 
Indian. 

Surely, I thought, everybody is doing it here. 

It was several years afterwards, that I had to make a busi- 
ness trip, which took me to the end of the Carson and Colorado 
railroad, at Keeler. in Inyo county, California and I was in- 
vited to go in the private car of the then superintendent of that 
road. He also went along, together with a partner in several 
important enterprises in which he was interested. It was ar- 
ranged that the car was to -v ait me at Mound House station 
in Nevada, where the Virginia and Truckee Railroad forks 
off to Virginia City. The night I left San Francisco for 
Reno, the Southern Pacific train being over-crowded, I in- 
vited a United States senator from Nevada, who had been 
very prominent in silver legislation in Congress, and a 
millionaire mining magnate of the Comstock, into my state- 
room for a smoke and chat. I had hoped to obtain some im- 
portant facts about the silver question from the senator. 
But, to my chagrin, they had no sooner lighted their cigars, 
then they had me ring for the porter and ask him to install 
the table' leaf that is used for card playing. Then, they went 
at it — draw poker, of course. I couldn't get a word in edge- 
wise. They played and played and I had to watch them and 
attend to the porter's bell and be polite, until 1 a. m., when 
they stopped. The senator was a small winner. They said 
they hoped I would have a "good night's rest," and depart 
ed, while I had to square it with the porter, whom I aroused 
out of a sound sleep to make up my stateroom. 



A Neglected Education 

The senator left the N. & T. train at Carson and, at 
Mound House, the Comstock magnate, who was going to 
Virgina City, bade me good-bye, saying: "Cinch 'em good, 
going down to Keeler." 

"What do you mean," I asked. 

"Why, you play cards, don't you?" 

"No! I'm not interested in them. Can't keep my mind 
on the game." 

The millionaire gave me a look of pity. "Your education 
has been sadly neglected," he said, as he waved a good-bye. 

The railroad man, and his partner, gave me a warm wel- 
come to the private car. In the living room was a table with 
a green cloth cover and three chairs had been placed around 
it. To my dismay, I saw on the table a pack of cards and 
two piles of red and white chips. The moment the car start- 
ed they took seats at the table and motioned me to occupy 
the third chair. 

"Oh, no," I said, "I never play cards and, besides, I want 
to see the country as we go down to Keeler." 

That settled it for me. They paid no further attention. 
While they played cards, all the way down to Keeler (over 
300 miles), and back to Mound House, I sat in a revolving 



chair, in a little turret, raised above the roof, with field 
glasses, viewing the tallest peaks of the Sierra Nevada range 
and other splendid scenery. When Mound House was 
reached on the return, I heard the railroad man ask his 
partner: "How do we stand?" 

"You owe me $17.50." 

"All right, I'll send you a check," he said. I thought the 
winner earned his money. 

(To be continued) 



Fox and the Norcross Tunnel 
Martin W. Fox, who became president of the Hale and 
Norcross Mining Company, after its control had been taken 
away from I lay ward and Hobart, and who headed a syndi- 
cate which won a suit for heavy damages, against the 
former management of the mine, will be remembered by 
veterans on the street. He had peculiar ideas about the 
development of the Comstock and believed that if a westerly- 
surface tunnel was run into the heart of Mount Davidson it 
would strike a big bonanza. This led to the starting of 
such a west drift, or tunnel, in Hale and Norcross ground 
and it was run over a mile into the mountain, or nearly 
half through. Nothing was found, except a few water 
fissures and the tunnel became too expensive a piece of 
work and was stopped. 

Fox was asked what would be done, if the tunnel ran 
clean through the mountain to the other side, without find- 
ing ore. 

"We shall keep on going," he replied, without a smile. 
"We will adopt Mark Twain's plan and build a trestle out 
into the valley on the other side and run the tunnel on the 
top of the trestle." 



— California Petrols have been advancing lately owing, 
to the announcements of additional increases in the price of 
oil. The company shares showed a marked raise; Pacific 
reached 65 Vj and there was a corresponding development 
all down the line. The predictions as to the raise in tht 
price of oil must be well founded, for the effect was felt 
universally. 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

^PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIDRARY 

239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



Make yourself at home at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tillmann Place, at 241 Grant Ave. 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Rare Rooks — First Editions — Fine Bindings 

Importations from Zachnsdorf, Root, Morrell, etc., of London 

Commissions in London Executed 

Single Bonks and Libraries Purchased 

Phone Kearny 5816 



p 

Su 

521 
In 


arisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

tm Pressed My Hnnd Only — Sulta Called For and Delivered j 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

PARISIAN DYEING AND CLEANING j 

Pont Street San Franctwco j 

Virginia Hotel Phone Franklin 2S10 j 

....--.-.- A 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel— 771 to 777 Valencia Street, Bet. 18th and 19th Sts.. 

San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



februarj 28, 192S 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



Wheat and Chaff 

By Nathaniel Anderson 




Nut h 11 ni el Anderson 



FAR back in 1842 an Indian regret- 
full)' spoke to Charles Dickens of 
the passing of his race. He had no par- 
ticularly lovely feelings for either the 
American or English white man. 
Dickens wanted the Indian to visit 
England, but the latter shook his head, 
with some remark that the English 
were always very agreeable to his peo- 
ple when they desired something ol 
them. This Indian was educated and a 
great reader, but he was talking on a 
steamboat that was taking him far 
back to the interior where dwelt his 
tribe. Here be intended to stay, and 
no doubt did. to live his own life as 
lived his ancestors. But he knew his 
people would be finally pushed further 
mi than that. 
Today we hear from Albuquerque, 

New Mexico, uf an Indian brave killed 
by a white constable because be 
thought he owned a piece of land in the 
unfertile and semi-mountainous coun- 
try, near Cuba, New Mexico. The In- 
dian was cutting posts from the bit of 
land "he believed his own." He was 
shot down when he rushed at the con- 
stable, l ; d Blanchfield. 

The Indians have a grievance down 
there where they have been forced to 
tin- border. Their lands have been rc- 

alloted in Sandoval county, to throw 
open a large tract of them to home- 
steading settlers, and the Indians are 
supposed to move to another part of 
their reservation. Its a poor reserva- 
1 1 < 'ii that isn't i eserved. 



And now comes information from 

Austin. Texas, that they torture pris- 
oners on the farms where they work. 
which seems to indicate that while in 
all parts of the country they torture 



prisoners with the third degree before 
conviction, in some parts they continue 
to maltreat them after they are sen- 
tenced, whether their guilt be estab- 
lished, or not by beating a confession 
out of them. 

* * * 

We have other news, too, not so un- 
pleasant, but strange, various and 
amusing. "Reverend Stuart Tyson, 
Episcopal clergyman, widely known 
for his published views on the indis- 
solubility of marriage, has filed suit for 
divorce from Mrs. Gertrude Tyson," at 
Trenton, N. J., and that the famous 
men are missing from the Hall of Fame 
at Washington, and that the Countess 
of Coventry is eighty-two years old, 
and has started for a bicycle ride on 
her diamond wedding anniversary, and 
that Mother Goose is bad for children. 
This last from New York. But we 
won't hold the city responsible for 
one man's opinions. In fact, Dr. Win- 
fred Sackville Stoner, who says thusly. 
had a New York actor opposing his 
views in a radio debate. 



Redwood Highway Open 
to Traffic 

The havoc caused by recent storms 
on the northern coast highway is rap- 
idly being repaired, according to the 
Touring Bureau of the National Auto- 
mobile Club. 

The detour which was necessary be- 
tween Sausalito and Corte Madera has 
been eliminated and traffic is now be- 
ing routed over the main highway 
which is back to normal condition. 

The highway north of Willits which 
was closed by slides is now open and 
traffic is getting through without any 
difficulty. It is still necessary, how- 
ever, to use the Northwestern Pacific 
Railroad Bridge over the Van Dusen 
River at Alton. 

* * * 

"San Francisco — Lowest Tax Rate." 
How's that for a slogan? You may 
rave about your climate, your harbor. 
your hills and your palaces, but there's 
no plea strikes home iike a low tax 
rate. In corroboration of what we sta'.ed 
in this column last week, the District 
Bureau of Governmental Research, in 
a review just received by the Chamber 
of Commerce, shows thai for the vears 
1922, 1923 and 1924 this city was the 
lowest taxed of any of the largest centers 
in the United States with a rate of SIT..}? 
per thousand dollars. Los Angeles was 
Fi urth with $19.80, New York ninth with 
$25.25 ami Chicago last but not least with 
$29.66! 

The above revelation is of course hit- 
ler fruit for the numerous Fraternity of 
Hammer Pushers hereabout, a few of 
whom actually make their livings by fer- 
reting out pseudo-Statistics out of which 
are fabricated knock-, but figures are 



DELINQUENT SALE 

MINERAL DEVELOPMENT COMPAN1 

l million of l'rliK'Ipnl Place of ItiiKliiegii, 
Sim Francisco, t'zillfomiu. 

NOTICE — There is delinquent upon the fol- 
lowing ilescrib.Ml stock on :n*i o u n I if :issi-ss 

menta levied mi the 18th day i>k January, 
l ; i ii r. . the several amounts Bel opposite the 
names of the respective shareholders, as fol- 
lows; 

Names No. Cert. No. Shares Amt. 

S. G. Colt 39 10.000 J50.00 

S. G. Colt 170 I, i 20.00 

Albion F. Clark 117 3,500 17.50 

W. H. Dean 13 5.000 25.00 

John Fleming- 17 3,000 15.00 

F. Greenwald 52 Hill .63 

E. W. Jordan 59 6,000 30.00 

W. J. Prewitt 76 10,000 50.00 

W. J. Prewitt 77 10.000 50.011 

W. J. Prewitt 7S 10.00(1 50.00 

W. J. Prewitt 143 15,000 76.00 

W. A. Selleck 94 7.500 37.50 

W. A. Selleck 169 4.000 20.00 

W. A. Selleck 211 1,000 5.00 

Edwin Snoddy 137 13.000 65.00 

Jason Turner 132 1,000 5.00 

And in accordance with the law and order 
of the Board of Directors, made on the 13th 
day of January, 1925, so many shares of each 
parcel of such stock as may be necessary will 
be sold at public auction at the office of tin- 
company. Room 237, Monadnock Building-, San 
Francisco, California, on Friday, the 20th day 
of March, 1925. at the hour of 12 o'clock noon 
of said day, to pay the delinquent assessment 
thereon, together with costs of advertising 
and expense of sale. 

M. J. SEELY, Secretary, 

237 Monadnock Bldg., 681 Market St.. 

San Francisco, California. 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK »no POST STS. 



handmaid to veracity and all the little 
hammers and all the little men can' 
make a 15 out of a 10. And the root of 
it: clean government, the minimum ol 
leak^ and patronage ( we have a few left l. 
civil service and method. Let's keep it 
up — or rather down: we mean thai tax 

rate. 

* * * 

Samuel Plimsol, in the middle of the 
nineteenth century, got the first con- 
structive marine laws through the 
English parliament. 

* * * 

The air i> so clear in Zululand that 
objects of fair size can be distinguished 

at a distance of seven or eight miles 
by starlight. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 28, 1925 




"the better it gets- 




GEO. AV. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 

1*800*000 cups were served at the Pan- 
ama PacIUc International Exposition 



Have Your Car 

DUCO 

ENAMELED 

Our System Will Give a 
Permanent Luster 

Does Not Fade Nor Crack 
This We Guarantee 

See Our Demonstration Car 

Everluster Auto Enameling Co. 
946 Bush Street Franklin 2775 



'Our new process does 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from Page 7) 

If you thrilled over "The Covered 
Wagon" you will be most enthusiastic 
over the new feature at the Imperial, 
for beginning today Zane Gray's mas- 
terful ~ romance, "The Thundering 
Herd" will be featured with Jack Holt 
and Lois Wilson, Raymond Hatton 
and Noah Beery in the stellar roles. 

Next week at the Cameo Theatre 
will be seen another thrilling western 
drama featuring Jack Hoxey in "Fly- 
ing Hoofs": There will be additional 
features in a special musical program, 
also several short reels will be run. 



At the Beaux Arts Club 
Ralph Stackpole, sculptor-painter, 

opened his exhibit at the Gallerie 
Beaux Arts. 116 Maiden Lane, on 
Wednesday, February 25th, and will 
be there for two weeks. This is the 
first comprehensive showing which 
Mr. Stackpole has had since his return 
from Europe. His portraits and other 
studies in oil are rich in color and 
modern in handling; while his bits of 
foreign landscape done in water color 
will interest not only those who have 
traveled, but also the stay-at-homes. 

fohn Henry Nash will lecture on 
next Tuesday evening, March 3rd, at 
8:30, on "Books in the Making", before 
the Club Beaux Arts members and 
their guests. 

>OTIC'E TO CHEDITOKS 

Estati "i DANIEL DENNEY, deceased.— 

No. i09.iL'. Dept. No. 1". 

Notice is hereby given by the under- 
signed w. J. tiynes, ;i d mi n i s t r .■■ t •• r of 
the estate of DANIEL DENNETT de- 
! i.. the creditors of and all persons 
having claims against the said decedent, to 
ii. them with the necessary vouchers within 

- i I ulis after the first publication of 

this notice, in the omv,- of the Clerk of the 
Superior Court of the state of California, in 
anil for the City and County of San Francisco. 
or to exhibit them with the necessary 

\ hers within four (4) months after the 

first publication of ibis notice to the said 

administrator, at his offlee. S:.s Chelan Build- 
ing, San Francisco, California, which said 

last-n: d office the undersigned selects as 

his place of business In all matters connected 
with said estate of DANIEL DENNEY, de- 
l W. .1. HYNES, administrator of the 
.slat. ■ DANIEL DENNEY, deceased. 

Dated, San Francisco, California, February 
19th, 11)25. 

CULLINAN & HICKEY, attorneys for ad- 
ministrator. 5t 



\OTICE TO CREDlTOItS 

Estate of HARRY SHERIDAN, deceased. — 
No. 10939 1 >• pt. No. 9. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned. 
w i Hynes. administrator of the estate of 
HARRY SHERIDAN deceased, to the c-ed- 
of and all persons having claims agalnsl 

the said decedent, to die litem with the neces- 
sary vouchers within four f4i months after 
On ftrsl PUbllCat t this notice, in the 

offlci ei the Clerk of the Superior Court of 

the Slal 'alii la. in and for the City 

anil COUnty of San Kraneisco, or to exhibit 
them with the necessary vouchers within 
four (Ii months after the first publication of 
this notice te the said administrator, at his 
office, sr.s Pheian Bulldine. San Francisco, 
California, which said last-named office the 
undersigned selects as his place of business in 
all matters connected with said estate of 
HARRY SHERIDAN, deceased. W. .1. HYNES. 
- ln.iiiist.ator of the estate of HARRY 
SHERIDAN, deceased. 

Dated. San Francisco, California, February 
lath. 192B. 

CULLINAN fi MICKEY, attorneys for ad- 
ministrator. St 



HERE IS 
A FIRM 



which means lots to the automobile 
owners. For a small monthly pay- 
ment they take all yoar automobile 
worries a~eay from you. 

Your car is kept in first-class mechani- 
cal condition. It's greased and oiled. 
It's towed in San Francisco free of 
charge. Replacement of parts up to 
$50 free, in case of damage by col- 
lision. 10 per cent discount on oils and 
greases and gasoline. Automobiles 
washed for $1.50. And other features. 

Investigate, or phone for 
representative 

Tel. Prospect 6070 



H. & S. 

GARAGE 

639 Turk Street 
San Francisco, Calif. 






PIONEER 




Ifc^JA'.'HLH .liMiHiH 



The 
Name ' 
on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or sta- 
tioner to show 
you samples. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
41 First Street, San Francisco 



Mail Advertising 
Specialists 

ACCURATE AND PROMPT 
SERVICE 

Andrews-Breeding Company 

Sutter 6224 

Room 801 Gillette Building 

830 MARKET STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



"RICKENBACKER" 



COUPE 

Model C. 



Driven Only 800 Miles. 
Completely Equipped. 
Perfect Condition. 
Guaranteed, Good as New. 

Owner leaving city — will sell at sacrifice. 
Terms if necessary. Original cost, $2,390. 

MAKE OFFER 

Car will be demonstrated by appointment. 

Box 36 

NEWS LETTER 




TOPS 

SEAT COVERS 

ENCLOSURES 

UPHOLSTERINC 

BODY BUILDINC 

REPAIRING 



-eu 



-^ 



American Auto Painting Co. 

Incorporated 

\ an Ness Avenue at Eddy Street 

Wm. B. Gibson, Mgr. Prospect4296 



«*r 



■**» 





Our 

SERVICE 
MANUAL 

will help you 



The Pacific Gas and Electric Company 

has been called "The Mightiest 

Servant in California." 

In order that it may he your servant — 
that you may have instantly available at 
all times, service that can be depended 
upon, more than 10,500 loyal, carefully 
trained men and women are ever ready 
for not only the routine tasks of the 
day's work, but for every emergency 
that threatens continuous service. 

The Service Manual 

The purpose of this booklet is to pre- 
sent suggestions, to show you how you 
may best take advantage of our service. 

Ask for a copy of this booklet at our 
local office. 



Pacific Gas and Electric Company 



" PACIFIC SERVICE " 



! 




STOVER MONOGRAM 

SIGNALS NOW HAVE 

STATE APPROVAL 

To save your life you can't buy better 

"AUTOMOBILE SAFETY ESSENTIALS" 

BIFLEX BUMPERS, 

BROWN REFLECTORS, 

GRAY EQUIPMENT, 

CIRCLITE SPOTLIGHTS. 

THE SAFETY HOUSE, Inc. 

New Location Larger Quarters 

1157 Post Street Tel. Prospect 860 



"Fashions 
for Spring 



in San Francisco," offers a dozen new style suggestions 
from the fashion centers, which will please our feminine 
readers. There are also some delightful views of San 
Francisco which are appropriately captioned "The City 
Beautiful." 



| "Around 
! America" 



Features many celebrities of national fame, and there 
are many foreign notables pictured "Over Seas." "In 
Storm and Calm" shows delightful marine views, and 
there are some unusual "Pets and Pests" photographed 
for your diversion — everyone will wish to see the 



Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 



=1 





Golden Gate 


Per 


ry Co. 






TIME TABLE 






SUMMER 


SCHEDULE EFFECTIVE 


MARCH 


1, 1925 


LEAVE SAl'SALITO 


LEAVE 


SAN FRANCISCO 


j 






Foot 


of Hyde 


Street 


A.M. 




P.M. 


A.M. 




P.M. 


4:30 




12:30 


5:00 




1 2 : 3u 


5:30 




1:00 


6:00 




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6:00 




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10:30 

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A.M. 

12:30 






8:00 

8:30 

9:00 

9:30 

10:00 

11:00 

12:00 

A.M. 

1:00 


Special twenty 


-mir 


ute service F 


•idays, Saturdays 


Sundays, 


Mondays, holic 


ays 


and such oth 


er times 


as traff 


c require- 






ments make necessary 






H. E. 


SPEAS, Vice-Pres 


dent an 


d Manag 


= r 



DO YOU WANT AN 



ASSURED STEADY INCOME ? 






We paid 
stockhold- 
ers a divi- 
dend of 10' ; 
in 1924. 



Every new cab 
means additional 

lift i-.'i r n i ni;-. of from 
fill) to SUM! n month. 
Every dollar will go 
into new equipment 

Join us for prentcr 
Itrotltfl. 



MAIL 

COUPON 

TODAY 



lien join us today as a part owner in 



CHECKER CAB CO. 



of San Francisco 

An established successful business in- 
joying a steady, uninterrupted in- 
come. We now need more tabs lo 
meet the demand for service and 
offer you a limited amount of 
our stock at 



$10 A SHARE 






.1. A. BALDI, President 

Checker ("nil C«. 

1046 California St.. San FrnuelNeo 



[ ] I am interested, 
details. 



Please send full 



[ J Please reserve for me shares 

of stock at $10 a share. 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



California Advertiser 



$5.00 PER YEAR 




Lewis Stone and Paulette Duval, 

the «<;;• beauty of the screen, '" " scene from the stage success of Samuel Shiftman, 
"Cheaper to Marry.'' the attraction at Loew's WarfieU starting Saturday. March 7th. 



KOHLER & CHASE 

Established 1850 
THE AMPICO IN THE 

KNABE $1850 and Up 

FISCHER $1050 and Up 
FRANKLIN $845 and Up 

Hi ■ TERMS = 



H®<rf> 



Why Your Friends Own The AMPICO 

YOUR friends have become the possessors of the Ampico 
because they, like you and every one, love music. It is 
because they have found that a piano or player piano 
does not fill the demand for music in their homes. Even 
though there might have been an accomplished pianist in the 
family he cannot always be commanded to play as the 
Ampico can, nor is he always willing and ready, with music 
of all kinds, as the Ampico is. 

For those long weeks when Nature turns her austere side 
toward us and we feel the chill of her change of mood and 
withdraw to the shelter of home and cluster about the fire- 
side, there is a certain lure to enchant us and carry us far on 
the road to happiness and that is Music. Well has Music 



been called the greatest of the Arts, beginning indeed where 
the others leave off for she vibrates in accord with them all 
and goes far beyond them all. 

She bears us to the Isles of Romance and takes us by the 
hand into moonlit gardens and we walk with her by the 
blue sea and feel the fresh wind in our faces. She takes us 
gayly dressed to the Carnival. She recreates for us the 
strange sounds of the Orient. We stand by the cradle as the 
mother sings to her babe. We dance, we laugh, we sing and 
even weep with her who holds in her powerful grasp all our 
joys, all our emotions and plays on them as she will. 

Music in its effect on man has a greater power than any 
other single influence and a home in which music dwells is 
a real home. 

We would tell you how the Ampico brings this, the 
divinest of the Arts to dwell under your roof. The keen 
enjoyment that it brings may be obtained at a compara- 
tively small outlay. It costs very little more than the price 
of the recordings for its upkeep. It depreciates in value 
very slowly and will continue its usefulness for many years 
and during its lifetime will prove to be an unending source 
of pleasure. 

Creating as it does a musical atmosphere in the home and 
contributing to the joy of the entire family, it is difficult to 
estimate the return for the investment which the Ampico 
will bring. 



Sacramento 
Fresxo 



KOHLER & CHASE 

SAX FRANCISCO. CALIF. 
1850 — 75 Years in California— 1925 



Oakland 
Sax Jose 




pCTE^^i 



^ 



____ dfotel 
JiIIf Alexandria 

LOS ANGELES 

qA Jtrsl ('lass Holel at Moderate 'Rales 

HE ALEXANDRIA has been 

praised by travelers from all parts 

of the world for the magnificence 

of its appointments, the comfortable and 

thoughtful service afforded guests, and for 

the excellence of its meals. 

1{ates per 1)ay, single, European Tlan 



The center for 
Theatres 
'Banks, Shops 



'Please -write 
for 'Booklet 





#2.50 to #4.00 
3.50 to 5.00 
6.00 to 8.00 



120 rooms with running water 
220 rooms with bath 
160 rooms with bath 

'Double, $4.00 up 

Also a number oflarge and beautiful rooms and suites, 
some in period furnishings with grand piano, fire place 
and bath, $10.00 up. 



Large and well equipped sample rooms. 



ItXANQHO QOLF CLUB 
available to all guests. 



Harold E. Lathrop 

&Aanagzr 



Sg^m 



r?s j tv<sv < -^-* ; s s?; es 




Time 




Card 



THE DEI'KNDABLE AUTOMOBILE FERRY Route offer* 
motorists the shortest and most direct rneaim of transporta- 
tlon from Oakland. San Francisco, and all points south, to 
Vnllejo, Sacramento, Sonoma. Napa and Lake Counties and 
nil pointH north. 



Leave Oakland 


111 


Leave Vallejo 


Side 


at 


O 




Side 


at 


"SHORT 


-WAY" 


> 


MORROW 


COVE 


A.M. 


P.M. 


rr 


A.M. 




P.M. 


+ 6:00 


2:40 


111 


t5:45 




2:20 


6:80 


3:00 


CO 


6:15 




2:40 


T:0O 


3:20 




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7:30 


3:40 


hi 


7:15 




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S:O0 


4:00 


H 


7:45 




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3 


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H:40 


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Z 


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0:00 


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8:00 




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E 


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X 


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1 


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> 
< 


11 :00 




6:40 


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7:20 


11:20 




7:00 


11:40 


7:40 


11:40 




7:20 


noon 


8:00 


5 


NOON 




7:45 


12:00 


8:30 




12:00 




8:15 


P.M. 


0:00 


h 


P.M. 




8:45 


12:20 


0:30 


K 


12:20 




0:15 


12:40 


10:00 


O 


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1:00 


10:30 


I 


1:00 




10:15 


1:20 


11:00 


w 


1:20 




10:45 


1:40 


•11:30 




1:40 




•11:15 


2:00 


•12:00 


111 


2:00 




•11:45 


2:20 


•12:30 


I 






•12:15 




•1:00 


r- 






•12:45 



•Saturday*, Sundays, Holidays — Extra Trips During Heavy 
Traffic, t Sundays and HolMnvs only. 

A VEX J. IIWFORI), Pres. and Gen. Mgr. 



EiutlMid July IO. IU* 

SAN F5i*JP««Co 



Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1S56, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

Jr., from 1884 to 1925. Is now printed and published by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 235 Montgomery St., San Francisco, California. Telephone 

Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, California, Post Office as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C. Londt n, 

England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year, $5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 





Vol. CVI 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 1925 



No. 10 







Helen Menken 

the brilliant young star of John Goldcn's New York success. "Seventh 
Heaven" coming to the New Columbia Monday. March 9th. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 7, 1925 




Next September we celebrate our 
Our Diamond Jubilee diamond jubilee as a state. W'e 

are sending invitations out to all 
the world. San Francisco will be the center of the celebra- 
tion. We need not point out what an important occasion 
that will be, not only to the State itself but to this part of 
the State in particular. The first settlement was made at 
San Diego in 1769 and several years elapsed, to be exact, 
seven, before Serra founded the mission which implied the 
first coming of white people into the State. It was not until 
sixty years after that the pueblo of Yerba Buena. now 
our'San Francisco, was an organized community. So we 
are a very young commonwealth, for we have grown from 
savagery'to what we call civilization in about 150 years. 
Of course, there is nothing remarkable about that. For an 
apparently new community is really just as old as the c< im- 
munity from which the settlers have come. Psychologically 
and as regards social equipment, the so-called new comes 
into possession of all that the old has achieved. Thus, 
Chesterton very truly says, that Johannesburg is for all prac- 
tical purposes as old as London. So we can claim all that 
the old possessed, and in addition, those accretions which 
we have made ourselves by virtue of our lives in a new 
community free from human contacts up to the time of 
our arrival. We supplanted no civilization, as there was 
none for us to supplant. In that sense all that we have is 
our own, the products of our own energy. So that the cele- 
bration which begins on September 7th and lasts till Sep- 
tember 12th will advertise the triumph of the American who 
has in so few years developed a portion of the earth from 
barren, pristine crudity to a place of honor and power 
among the peoples. It is a great achievement in which all 
the State has its part and the celebration, to be successful, 
must take in all parts of the State and be made so universal 
that nothing that has contributed shall be ignored. 



The municipal engineer has rec- 
The Municipal Railways ommended a $6,000,000 bond 

issue for additions and improve- 
ments to the municipal railway system as well as a com- 
plete revision of the finance system. We have always in- 
sisted that that finance system would have to be overhauled 
if the entire system of railways was not to go on the rocks. 
Boards of Supervisors are very excellent people, as a rule, 
but one would hardly deem them capable of the manage- 
ment of such a specialized business as a street railway and. 
as a matter of fact, though they do their best, the residts 
might be better. However, it is growing upon the mind of 
the city engineer at least that certain extensions and im- 
provements will have to be made if the system is to be main- 
tained and, of course it must be maintained, for it is our 
property and it cannot be allowed to depreciate. The 
recommendation of the city engineer that a depreciation 
fund be set to the amount of four per cent on $7,500,000 
per year is elementary, for the eighteen per cent of gross 
receipts now set aside for depreciation is too high. The city 
engineer remarks that the municipal lines are an undoubted 
success. On this there may be two opinions, at least, but 
there can be no counter opinion on the question that the 
addition of the present railways systems operating inde- 
pendently of the municipal system would make a colossal 
success of the municipal system, provided that these roads 
were bought at a reasonable price and paid for on a fair 
valuation. There can be no doubt of the importance of 



such a method of handling the present situation and we 
are surprised that the city engineer in the course of his 
fine report did not take up what he must have well recog- 
nized to be the most important factor in the matter of the 
municipal railways. We need an amalgamation of all the 
roads under city ownership to niake the municipal lines 
what they should be. 



Every session of the legislature 
Adolescent Legislators has its scandal. Generally speak- 
ing these scandals are of the most 
elementary and crude nature and imply no more intelli- 
gence on the part of those involved than the cases that come 
up before the juvenile court. It must not be imagined that 
there is always fire where there is a smoke in. political 
matters, for all sorts of stratagems are resorted to in order 
to make a smoke screen, where there is actually no fire at 
all. More than once a promising career has been wrecked 
by unjust charges, which have no basis in fact, but which 
have come clothed with malice from the brain of a plotter. 
But it must be remembered that if the victim has fallen 
through the hostile plotting of his enemies he has nearly 
always paid the price of his own sheer stupidity which al- 
lowed him to place himself in a position where he could be 
attacked. To "avoid the appearance of evil" is even better 
than to avoid the evil itself, from a practical standpoint. 
And what is all this about? Simply this, that a state sen- 
ator who has served well for years and who has borne an 
unsmirched political reputation, finds himself coupled with 
another in a charge of extortion, growing out of relations 
with a Chinese herbalist, wdio had a political axe to grind. 
Can it ever be impressed upon the minds of our politicians 
that there is such a thing as personal dignity and that there 
are certain reasonable restraints upon the actions of those 
who are the elected representatives of the people as a 
whole? What on earth was a state senator doing at the 
office of a Chinese herbalist along with an ex-policeman 
who wanted to make some money out of lobbying? That 
is putting the matter in its most favorable aspect and no 
one who looks at it without a squint can feel other than 
disgusted that such a thing could have happened to a 
senator, apart altogether from any question of his guilt 
or innocence. It is mere kiddishness and utterlv without 
dignity. 



Do you remember the case of the young 
A Social Lack artist who committed suicide a few weeks 

ago in San Francisco. It was a par- 
ticularly hard case. He was found dead in his room suffo- 
cated with gas. He was only twenty-six years of age and 
was practically starved, as he had fainted for lack of food 
and been picked up by a doctor only the day before. It is 
very true, in all probability, that the artist paid the penaltv 
of his own folly and carelessness of living and that had 
he been other than he was such a thing might not have 
happened. Artists have a hard time usually, at first, unless 
they can secure more attention than falls to the lot of the 
average. In some respects, this difficulty acts as a sort of 
winnower and disposes of the unfit, causing them to with- 
draw from the profession for which they are not suited and 
to which they would lend no lustre. On the other hand 
"the conditions may be such, as in this case, where the over 
sensitiveness of the artist causes his destruction and where 
a little proper assistance might easily have saved the day 
both for the artist and for the social group. We say the 
social group, advisedly, as the loss of an artist, even a 
second rate artist, is a great social loss. This may not be 
apparent to those whose main work in life is the dealing 
with concrete and objective realities and who consequently 
regard those whose work is with the abstract and the ideal 
as consequently unreal. It is this failure to recognize the 



March 7, 1925 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTlSFk 



artist's point of view, which causes us to look down on him. 
But the artist is necessary to society. Without him, we 
should be little better than the beasts that perish. When 
we recover the vestiges of past civilization from the ruins 
of time, it is the art vestiges that remain, pictures, statues, 
buildings. The material wealth for which the most of the 
inhabitants strove has vanished. The only claim of the 
resurrected society to human notice is its art. 



expended in their accumulation. Their founders have con- 
tributed as a rule social values in the pursuit of their ma- 
terial possessions and we are all the better off for their 
labors. 



Never has any propaganda made such 
Air Supremacy headway as has that of the air force 
as against the established means of war- 
fare. The army and navy are both confused by the speed 
with which the new weapon has been forged and much of 
what has appeared to be stupidity can be credited to mere in- 
ability to grasp the situation. This has been very plainly 
seen in Great Britain. It will be remembered that after 
the war England practically let her air force remain unde- 
veloped. France on the other hand built up a magnificent 
fighting machine in the air and the world gaped at England, 
prone under the threat of French airplanes. Suddenly, 
England woke up. As a matter of fact she had not been 
sleeping, but had been quietly working out the mechanical 
problems of air warfare and comes out today with new 
planes and new engines which make the weapons of her 
rivals puny in comparison and which place her in the very 
forefront of air power, much as her dreadnaughts did with 
the sea power. Today Great Britain is spending as much 
on her air service as on her navy. She has made planes 
which bring London within nine days of her most distant 
colonies. She is preparing an air defense of twenty-six 
squadrons of the most perfect planes yet devised, and she 
is preparing them against a day which she dreads and feels 
to be coming. These are the words of Sir Samuel Hoare, 
secretary of state for air: 

"We see, year by year, instruments of destruction per- 
fected for the air, and we realize the great possibilities of 
development in the range of bombs, chemicals and liquid 
gas. We are appalled at the prospects for the future, and, 
unless we can control it, air warfare may re-endanger the 
whole foundation of civilization." 



There is not a touch of the 
Our Straightforward President demagogue about Presi- 
dent Coolidge. He seems 
to inherit that straightforwardness which marks his father 
and which has already endeared the latter to American 
imagination for his simplicity and fine lack of any snobbery. 
The President does not follow the example of an illustrious 
predecessor and talk about "malefactors of great wealth." 
He indulges in no platitudes about the accumulations of 
riches which mark certain sections of the community from 
others less able or less fortunate. We have had able presi- 
dents and men of the most conservative mind who have 
yet indulged in the twaddle with which the mob must occa- 
sionally be flattered and amused. Not so with our Presi- 
dent today, who says plainly : "Personally, I do not feel 
that large fortunes properly managed are necessarily a men- 
ace to our institutions, and therefore ought to be destroyed. 
On the contrary, they have been and can be of gr